Interventions Phase 2: Harewaves Wireless Inc.

Document Name: 2015-134.226639.2518736.Interventions Phase 2(1hzgw01!).html

As a small rural wireless internet provider, this conversation is important to us. We are finding it harder and harder to get licensed wireless frequency and customer demand going up. But the demand is not really related to essential services, or at least not what we consider essential. Video on Demand services are the largest usage of precious wireless spectrum and are making it difficult to deliver the traditional, what we call essential, internet services. A large number of subscribers are cancelling the traditional satellite and cable TV services and trying to watch everything over the "free" internet. At some point this bubble is going to burst under the shear weight of it.I see questions in your survey like "Should the prices for telecommunications services in Canada be similar between urban and non-urban areas?". I am not sure if there is any non urban person that would not answer yes to this question, but what are the implications to that? Where does the additional cost get absorbed for those living in harder to reach area? Would the urban subscriber volunteer to pay more for their services to offset the cost for rural users?Available wireless spectrum is also a problem. Industry Canada appears to be catering to large cellular providers using spectrum auctions that include major centers so it is not feasible to enter for the rural service provider. Cellular providers are boasting 20Mbit speeds on their LTE networks, but do not give any sort of reasonable data plans. What is the point of getting your data at that speed if the data plan is used up in a day or two? I believe the "digital economy" needs to be defined to Canadians before they can answer the question of what telecommunication services they consider necessary to participate. Are we looking to provide services for business, education, and communication, or are we trying to fulfill the demand for "free" entertainment (video on demand)? If we are trying to accomplish everything including entertainment, then the various government departments really have to look at who is really providing these services and what tools they need to make it work. Cellular services do not encompass where people are at today with their Data needs.Raisons pour comparaitre / Reasons for appearanceSpecific Topics:What is the definition of digital economy?What is considered necessary to participate in the digital economy? What kind of speeds are required for those services for a service provider standpoint?If prices were similar for urban and non-urban areas, where would the cost difference be absorbed?Reasons:Just wanted some dialogue on the conversation and the ability to have a two way conversation, but it may not be the place for it.

Interventions Phase 2: Harewaves Wireless (Intervenor 391)

Document Name: 2015-134.226639.2518736.Interventions Phase 2(1hzgw01!).html

As a small rural wireless internet provider, this conversation is important to us. We are finding it harder and harder to get licensed wireless frequency and customer demand going up. But the demand is not really related to essential services, or at least not what we consider essential. Video on Demand services are the largest usage of precious wireless spectrum and are making it difficult to deliver the traditional, what we call essential, internet services. A large number of subscribers are cancelling the traditional satellite and cable TV services and trying to watch everything over the "free" internet. At some point this bubble is going to burst under the shear weight of it.I see questions in your survey like "Should the prices for telecommunications services in Canada be similar between urban and non-urban areas?". I am not sure if there is any non urban person that would not answer yes to this question, but what are the implications to that? Where does the additional cost get absorbed for those living in harder to reach area? Would the urban subscriber volunteer to pay more for their services to offset the cost for rural users?Available wireless spectrum is also a problem. Industry Canada appears to be catering to large cellular providers using spectrum auctions that include major centers so it is not feasible to enter for the rural service provider. Cellular providers are boasting 20Mbit speeds on their LTE networks, but do not give any sort of reasonable data plans. What is the point of getting your data at that speed if the data plan is used up in a day or two? I believe the "digital economy" needs to be defined to Canadians before they can answer the question of what telecommunication services they consider necessary to participate. Are we looking to provide services for business, education, and communication, or are we trying to fulfill the demand for "free" entertainment (video on demand)? If we are trying to accomplish everything including entertainment, then the various government departments really have to look at who is really providing these services and what tools they need to make it work. Cellular services do not encompass where people are at today with their Data needs.Raisons pour comparaitre / Reasons for appearanceSpecific Topics:What is the definition of digital economy?What is considered necessary to participate in the digital economy? What kind of speeds are required for those services for a service provider standpoint?If prices were similar for urban and non-urban areas, where would the cost difference be absorbed?Reasons:Just wanted some dialogue on the conversation and the ability to have a two way conversation, but it may not be the place for it.