Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2394828 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - Iristel_CRTC_8_ABRIDGED.pdf

ABRIDGED IRISTEL RESPONSE TO INTERROGATORY 14 JULY 2015 IRISTEL (CRTC) 8 ABRIDGED PAGE 1 OF 1

INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

THE CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Network Infrastructure

Q: 8. [TSPs]

With respect to your company’s operating territory, provide the following information for Internet services (excluding dial-up) that you offer:

a. the total number of households that your company is capable of serving;

b. the total number of households served by your company; and

c. the total number of households served that meet the Commission’s broadband Internet target speeds of 5 Mbps download / 1 Mbps upload.6

A: a. In **** Canada, Iristel offers internet services using Bell’s Gateway Access Service - http://www.bce.ca/assets/Tariffs/bellcanada/GT/5/5410.pdf?version=1436809582796 , therefore we are purely dependent on their coverage.

Iristel also offers internet in Iqaluit, NU, where are 2,370 households. Iristel can serve them all.

b. At this point, we offer internet services to # households.

c. # of the households we serve meet the Commission’s broadband Internet target speeds of 5 Mbps download / 1 Mbps upload.

Certain information contained in the response to this request for information is filed in confidence with the Commission pursuant to section 39 of the Act. The information in question is: (1) commercial information pertaining to the service offerings of Iristel. Disclosure of this information could prejudice the competitive position of Iristel and result in material loss, thereby causing specific direct harm. There is no discernible public benefit to the disclosure of the information in question. Therefore, the public interest in disclosure does not outweigh the specific direct harm to Iristel resulting from such disclosure.

***END OF DOCUMENT*** # filed in Confidence

http://www.bce.ca/assets/Tariffs/bellcanada/GT/5/5410.pdf?version=1436809582796

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2394828 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - Iristel_CRTC_8_ABRIDGED.pdf

ABRIDGED IRISTEL RESPONSE TO INTERROGATORY 14 JULY 2015 IRISTEL (CRTC) 8 ABRIDGED PAGE 1 OF 1

INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

THE CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Network Infrastructure

Q: 8. [TSPs]

With respect to your company’s operating territory, provide the following information for Internet services (excluding dial-up) that you offer:

a. the total number of households that your company is capable of serving;

b. the total number of households served by your company; and

c. the total number of households served that meet the Commission’s broadband Internet target speeds of 5 Mbps download / 1 Mbps upload.6

A: a. In **** Canada, Iristel offers internet services using Bell’s Gateway Access Service - http://www.bce.ca/assets/Tariffs/bellcanada/GT/5/5410.pdf?version=1436809582796 , therefore we are purely dependent on their coverage.

Iristel also offers internet in Iqaluit, NU, where are 2,370 households. Iristel can serve them all.

b. At this point, we offer internet services to # households.

c. # of the households we serve meet the Commission’s broadband Internet target speeds of 5 Mbps download / 1 Mbps upload.

Certain information contained in the response to this request for information is filed in confidence with the Commission pursuant to section 39 of the Act. The information in question is: (1) commercial information pertaining to the service offerings of Iristel. Disclosure of this information could prejudice the competitive position of Iristel and result in material loss, thereby causing specific direct harm. There is no discernible public benefit to the disclosure of the information in question. Therefore, the public interest in disclosure does not outweigh the specific direct harm to Iristel resulting from such disclosure.

***END OF DOCUMENT*** # filed in Confidence

http://www.bce.ca/assets/Tariffs/bellcanada/GT/5/5410.pdf?version=1436809582796

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2394828 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - Iristel_CRTC_8_ABRIDGED.pdf

ABRIDGED IRISTEL RESPONSE TO INTERROGATORY 14 JULY 2015 IRISTEL (CRTC) 8 ABRIDGED PAGE 1 OF 1

INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

THE CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Network Infrastructure

Q: 8. [TSPs]

With respect to your company’s operating territory, provide the following information for Internet services (excluding dial-up) that you offer:

a. the total number of households that your company is capable of serving;

b. the total number of households served by your company; and

c. the total number of households served that meet the Commission’s broadband Internet target speeds of 5 Mbps download / 1 Mbps upload.6

A: a. In **** Canada, Iristel offers internet services using Bell’s Gateway Access Service - http://www.bce.ca/assets/Tariffs/bellcanada/GT/5/5410.pdf?version=1436809582796 , therefore we are purely dependent on their coverage.

Iristel also offers internet in Iqaluit, NU, where are 2,370 households. Iristel can serve them all.

b. At this point, we offer internet services to # households.

c. # of the households we serve meet the Commission’s broadband Internet target speeds of 5 Mbps download / 1 Mbps upload.

Certain information contained in the response to this request for information is filed in confidence with the Commission pursuant to section 39 of the Act. The information in question is: (1) commercial information pertaining to the service offerings of Iristel. Disclosure of this information could prejudice the competitive position of Iristel and result in material loss, thereby causing specific direct harm. There is no discernible public benefit to the disclosure of the information in question. Therefore, the public interest in disclosure does not outweigh the specific direct harm to Iristel resulting from such disclosure.

***END OF DOCUMENT*** # filed in Confidence

http://www.bce.ca/assets/Tariffs/bellcanada/GT/5/5410.pdf?version=1436809582796

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2394828 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - Iristel_CRTC_8_ABRIDGED.pdf

ABRIDGED IRISTEL RESPONSE TO INTERROGATORY 14 JULY 2015 IRISTEL (CRTC) 8 ABRIDGED PAGE 1 OF 1

INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

THE CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Network Infrastructure

Q: 8. [TSPs]

With respect to your company’s operating territory, provide the following information for Internet services (excluding dial-up) that you offer:

a. the total number of households that your company is capable of serving;

b. the total number of households served by your company; and

c. the total number of households served that meet the Commission’s broadband Internet target speeds of 5 Mbps download / 1 Mbps upload.6

A: a. In **** Canada, Iristel offers internet services using Bell’s Gateway Access Service - http://www.bce.ca/assets/Tariffs/bellcanada/GT/5/5410.pdf?version=1436809582796 , therefore we are purely dependent on their coverage.

Iristel also offers internet in Iqaluit, NU, where are 2,370 households. Iristel can serve them all.

b. At this point, we offer internet services to # households.

c. # of the households we serve meet the Commission’s broadband Internet target speeds of 5 Mbps download / 1 Mbps upload.

Certain information contained in the response to this request for information is filed in confidence with the Commission pursuant to section 39 of the Act. The information in question is: (1) commercial information pertaining to the service offerings of Iristel. Disclosure of this information could prejudice the competitive position of Iristel and result in material loss, thereby causing specific direct harm. There is no discernible public benefit to the disclosure of the information in question. Therefore, the public interest in disclosure does not outweigh the specific direct harm to Iristel resulting from such disclosure.

***END OF DOCUMENT*** # filed in Confidence

http://www.bce.ca/assets/Tariffs/bellcanada/GT/5/5410.pdf?version=1436809582796

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2394829 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - Iristel_CRTC_9_ABRIDGED.pdf

ABRIDGED IRISTEL RESPONSE TO INTERROGATORY 14 JULY 2015 IRISTEL (CRTC) 9 ABRIDGED PAGE 1 OF 2

INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

THE CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION [TSPs]

Q: 9. With respect to your company’s operating territory, provide the following information for areas that are currently unserved7 or underserved8 as of December 2014:

a. the technologies used in the access facilities for serving subscribers (or households), such as fixed wireless access (licensed or unlicensed), satellite (direct to home), cable modem, digital subscriber line (DSL), fibre-optics and mobile wireless;

b. for each technology in (a) above, the average upstream and downstream Internet speeds that you offer;

c. the technologies used for connecting to the PoP and average capacities in Mbps to / from the PoP);

and

d. a map showing your operating territory with the types and locations of access facilities in MapInfo or compatible format.

A: a. In Iqaluit, NU, Iristel uses #.

b. The average upstream is # Mbps download and # Mbps upload.

c. The technology used for connecting to the PoP is #, and the average capacities are: # Mbps download and # Mbps upload.

d. In the attached document, ‘Iristel.png’, filed in confidence, you may find all Iristel POPs. However, the only unserved or underserved area that Iristel serves is Iqaluit, NU.

Certain information contained in the response to this request for information is filed in confidence with the Commission pursuant to section 39 of the Act. The information in question is: (1) commercial information pertaining to the service offerings of Iristel and (2) technical information regarding the network facilities and specifications deployed and utilized by Iristel. Disclosure of this information could prejudice the competitive position of Iristel and result in material loss, thereby causing specific direct harm. There is no discernible public benefit to the disclosure of the information in question. Therefore, the public interest in disclosure does not outweigh the specific direct harm to Iristel resulting from such disclosure.

ABRIDGED IRISTEL RESPONSE TO INTERROGATORY 14 JULY 2015 IRISTEL (CRTC) 9 ABRIDGED PAGE 2 OF 2

INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

THE CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION ***END OF DOCUMENT*** # filed in Confidence

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2394829 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - Iristel_CRTC_9_ABRIDGED.pdf

ABRIDGED IRISTEL RESPONSE TO INTERROGATORY 14 JULY 2015 IRISTEL (CRTC) 9 ABRIDGED PAGE 1 OF 2

INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

THE CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION [TSPs]

Q: 9. With respect to your company’s operating territory, provide the following information for areas that are currently unserved7 or underserved8 as of December 2014:

a. the technologies used in the access facilities for serving subscribers (or households), such as fixed wireless access (licensed or unlicensed), satellite (direct to home), cable modem, digital subscriber line (DSL), fibre-optics and mobile wireless;

b. for each technology in (a) above, the average upstream and downstream Internet speeds that you offer;

c. the technologies used for connecting to the PoP and average capacities in Mbps to / from the PoP);

and

d. a map showing your operating territory with the types and locations of access facilities in MapInfo or compatible format.

A: a. In Iqaluit, NU, Iristel uses #.

b. The average upstream is # Mbps download and # Mbps upload.

c. The technology used for connecting to the PoP is #, and the average capacities are: # Mbps download and # Mbps upload.

d. In the attached document, ‘Iristel.png’, filed in confidence, you may find all Iristel POPs. However, the only unserved or underserved area that Iristel serves is Iqaluit, NU.

Certain information contained in the response to this request for information is filed in confidence with the Commission pursuant to section 39 of the Act. The information in question is: (1) commercial information pertaining to the service offerings of Iristel and (2) technical information regarding the network facilities and specifications deployed and utilized by Iristel. Disclosure of this information could prejudice the competitive position of Iristel and result in material loss, thereby causing specific direct harm. There is no discernible public benefit to the disclosure of the information in question. Therefore, the public interest in disclosure does not outweigh the specific direct harm to Iristel resulting from such disclosure.

ABRIDGED IRISTEL RESPONSE TO INTERROGATORY 14 JULY 2015 IRISTEL (CRTC) 9 ABRIDGED PAGE 2 OF 2

INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

THE CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION ***END OF DOCUMENT*** # filed in Confidence

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2394829 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - Iristel_CRTC_9_ABRIDGED.pdf

ABRIDGED IRISTEL RESPONSE TO INTERROGATORY 14 JULY 2015 IRISTEL (CRTC) 9 ABRIDGED PAGE 1 OF 2

INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

THE CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION [TSPs]

Q: 9. With respect to your company’s operating territory, provide the following information for areas that are currently unserved7 or underserved8 as of December 2014:

a. the technologies used in the access facilities for serving subscribers (or households), such as fixed wireless access (licensed or unlicensed), satellite (direct to home), cable modem, digital subscriber line (DSL), fibre-optics and mobile wireless;

b. for each technology in (a) above, the average upstream and downstream Internet speeds that you offer;

c. the technologies used for connecting to the PoP and average capacities in Mbps to / from the PoP);

and

d. a map showing your operating territory with the types and locations of access facilities in MapInfo or compatible format.

A: a. In Iqaluit, NU, Iristel uses #.

b. The average upstream is # Mbps download and # Mbps upload.

c. The technology used for connecting to the PoP is #, and the average capacities are: # Mbps download and # Mbps upload.

d. In the attached document, ‘Iristel.png’, filed in confidence, you may find all Iristel POPs. However, the only unserved or underserved area that Iristel serves is Iqaluit, NU.

Certain information contained in the response to this request for information is filed in confidence with the Commission pursuant to section 39 of the Act. The information in question is: (1) commercial information pertaining to the service offerings of Iristel and (2) technical information regarding the network facilities and specifications deployed and utilized by Iristel. Disclosure of this information could prejudice the competitive position of Iristel and result in material loss, thereby causing specific direct harm. There is no discernible public benefit to the disclosure of the information in question. Therefore, the public interest in disclosure does not outweigh the specific direct harm to Iristel resulting from such disclosure.

ABRIDGED IRISTEL RESPONSE TO INTERROGATORY 14 JULY 2015 IRISTEL (CRTC) 9 ABRIDGED PAGE 2 OF 2

INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

THE CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION ***END OF DOCUMENT*** # filed in Confidence

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2394829 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - Iristel_CRTC_9_ABRIDGED.pdf

ABRIDGED IRISTEL RESPONSE TO INTERROGATORY 14 JULY 2015 IRISTEL (CRTC) 9 ABRIDGED PAGE 1 OF 2

INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

THE CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION [TSPs]

Q: 9. With respect to your company’s operating territory, provide the following information for areas that are currently unserved7 or underserved8 as of December 2014:

a. the technologies used in the access facilities for serving subscribers (or households), such as fixed wireless access (licensed or unlicensed), satellite (direct to home), cable modem, digital subscriber line (DSL), fibre-optics and mobile wireless;

b. for each technology in (a) above, the average upstream and downstream Internet speeds that you offer;

c. the technologies used for connecting to the PoP and average capacities in Mbps to / from the PoP);

and

d. a map showing your operating territory with the types and locations of access facilities in MapInfo or compatible format.

A: a. In Iqaluit, NU, Iristel uses #.

b. The average upstream is # Mbps download and # Mbps upload.

c. The technology used for connecting to the PoP is #, and the average capacities are: # Mbps download and # Mbps upload.

d. In the attached document, ‘Iristel.png’, filed in confidence, you may find all Iristel POPs. However, the only unserved or underserved area that Iristel serves is Iqaluit, NU.

Certain information contained in the response to this request for information is filed in confidence with the Commission pursuant to section 39 of the Act. The information in question is: (1) commercial information pertaining to the service offerings of Iristel and (2) technical information regarding the network facilities and specifications deployed and utilized by Iristel. Disclosure of this information could prejudice the competitive position of Iristel and result in material loss, thereby causing specific direct harm. There is no discernible public benefit to the disclosure of the information in question. Therefore, the public interest in disclosure does not outweigh the specific direct harm to Iristel resulting from such disclosure.

ABRIDGED IRISTEL RESPONSE TO INTERROGATORY 14 JULY 2015 IRISTEL (CRTC) 9 ABRIDGED PAGE 2 OF 2

INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

THE CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION ***END OF DOCUMENT*** # filed in Confidence

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2388702 - 2015-134 - Responses to requests for information - Government of the Northwest Territories.pdf

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2388702 - 2015-134 - Responses to requests for information - Government of the Northwest Territories.pdf

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2388702 - 2015-134 - Responses to requests for information - Government of the Northwest Territories.pdf

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2388702 - 2015-134 - Responses to requests for information - Government of the Northwest Territories.pdf

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2395145 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - Telesat - CRTC TNOC 2015-134 Responses_1.pdf

TELESAT Response to Request for Information 14 July 2015 Telesat(CRTC)7May15 – 1

**** 1 of 1
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CRTC)

1. Identify the number and corresponding percentage of residential customers subscribing to the services listed below as of December 2014 by each province/territory where the company provides service:

a. the lowest priced wireline voice service; and b. the lowest priced postpaid mobile wireless voice plan.

For each service, specify the percentage of customers located in i) high cost serving areas (HCSAs) and ii) non-HCSAs.4 Provide a description of each service offering (e.g.

optional services or enhanced features; number of local minutes for daytime, evenings, and weekends; long distance minutes; number of text messages included). Specify 1) the non-discounted price for each service, 2) whether the price is available throughout the province/territory providing the reasons for any differences, and 3) any additional monthly charges that may apply.

ANSWER:
Not applicable to Telesat.
*** End of Document ***

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2395145 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - Telesat - CRTC TNOC 2015-134 Responses_1.pdf

TELESAT Response to Request for Information 14 July 2015 Telesat(CRTC)7May15 – 1

**** 1 of 1
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CRTC)

1. Identify the number and corresponding percentage of residential customers subscribing to the services listed below as of December 2014 by each province/territory where the company provides service:

a. the lowest priced wireline voice service; and b. the lowest priced postpaid mobile wireless voice plan.

For each service, specify the percentage of customers located in i) high cost serving areas (HCSAs) and ii) non-HCSAs.4 Provide a description of each service offering (e.g.

optional services or enhanced features; number of local minutes for daytime, evenings, and weekends; long distance minutes; number of text messages included). Specify 1) the non-discounted price for each service, 2) whether the price is available throughout the province/territory providing the reasons for any differences, and 3) any additional monthly charges that may apply.

ANSWER:
Not applicable to Telesat.
*** End of Document ***

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2395145 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - Telesat - CRTC TNOC 2015-134 Responses_1.pdf

TELESAT Response to Request for Information 14 July 2015 Telesat(CRTC)7May15 – 1

**** 1 of 1
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CRTC)

1. Identify the number and corresponding percentage of residential customers subscribing to the services listed below as of December 2014 by each province/territory where the company provides service:

a. the lowest priced wireline voice service; and b. the lowest priced postpaid mobile wireless voice plan.

For each service, specify the percentage of customers located in i) high cost serving areas (HCSAs) and ii) non-HCSAs.4 Provide a description of each service offering (e.g.

optional services or enhanced features; number of local minutes for daytime, evenings, and weekends; long distance minutes; number of text messages included). Specify 1) the non-discounted price for each service, 2) whether the price is available throughout the province/territory providing the reasons for any differences, and 3) any additional monthly charges that may apply.

ANSWER:
Not applicable to Telesat.
*** End of Document ***

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2395145 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - Telesat - CRTC TNOC 2015-134 Responses_1.pdf

TELESAT Response to Request for Information 14 July 2015 Telesat(CRTC)7May15 – 1

**** 1 of 1
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CRTC)

1. Identify the number and corresponding percentage of residential customers subscribing to the services listed below as of December 2014 by each province/territory where the company provides service:

a. the lowest priced wireline voice service; and b. the lowest priced postpaid mobile wireless voice plan.

For each service, specify the percentage of customers located in i) high cost serving areas (HCSAs) and ii) non-HCSAs.4 Provide a description of each service offering (e.g.

optional services or enhanced features; number of local minutes for daytime, evenings, and weekends; long distance minutes; number of text messages included). Specify 1) the non-discounted price for each service, 2) whether the price is available throughout the province/territory providing the reasons for any differences, and 3) any additional monthly charges that may apply.

ANSWER:
Not applicable to Telesat.
*** End of Document ***

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2396745 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - TekSavvy_CRTC_7May15-11 ABRIDGED.doc
CONFIDENTIAL
TekSavvy Solutions Inc.
Response to Request
2 May 2014
TekSavvy(CRTC)28Mar14-17
TNC 2013-551
**** 1 of 1
ABRIDGED
TekSavvy Solutions Inc.
Response to Request
14 July 2015
TekSavvy(CRTC)7May15-11
TNC 2015-134
**** 2 of 2
**** 1 of 2
Q11
[TSPs]

To better understand historical and projected network utilization and demand for broadband Internet access services, provide responses to the following questions.

a.

Describe the various engineering assumptions associated with network deployments/upgrades, such as percentage of active users (i.e. households) at peak periods and at other times of day, as well as their peak usage demands. Provide the oversubscription ratios used.

b.

Are different engineering assumptions utilized when planning network deployments/upgrades in different geographic areas, when different technologies are used, or where different speed tiers are offered to end users? If yes, please explain these differences.

c.

For each of the years 2010 to 2014, provide 1) the network engineering assumption for throughput bandwidth allocated to each end user expressed in kilobits per second (kbps) (i.e. engineered throughput), and 2) the average volume of data used per end user expressed in gigabytes (GB) per month.

d.

For each of the years 2015 to 2019, provide the forecasts for the information requested in part c) above.

A.
a.
#
b..
#
c.
#
d.
#
Confidential information:

Information about TekSavvy’s engineering assumptions are intensely confidential, including their extent, their nature, the range and types of assumptions on which they rely.

This technical information is a trade secret. It is not known to anyone, is treated consistently in a confidential manner, and would, if disclosed, prejudice TekSavvy’s competitive position in ways that would result in specific, direct harm to TekSavvy, by giving its competitors and suppliers direct insight into TekSavvy’s technical decisions and approach.

All of TekSavvy’s response to this RFI reveal information regarding TekSavvy’s engineering assumptions. For these reasons, TekSavvy’s response is designated as confidential pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act; in the manner indicated by section 32 of the CRTC Rules of Practice and Procedure; and following the guidelines set out in Procedures for filing confidential information and requesting its disclosure in Commission proceedings, Broadcasting and Telecom Information Bulletin CRTC 2010-961, 3 December 2010.

***End of Document***

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2396745 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - TekSavvy_CRTC_7May15-11 ABRIDGED.doc
CONFIDENTIAL
TekSavvy Solutions Inc.
Response to Request
2 May 2014
TekSavvy(CRTC)28Mar14-17
TNC 2013-551
**** 1 of 1
ABRIDGED
TekSavvy Solutions Inc.
Response to Request
14 July 2015
TekSavvy(CRTC)7May15-11
TNC 2015-134
**** 2 of 2
**** 1 of 2
Q11
[TSPs]

To better understand historical and projected network utilization and demand for broadband Internet access services, provide responses to the following questions.

a.

Describe the various engineering assumptions associated with network deployments/upgrades, such as percentage of active users (i.e. households) at peak periods and at other times of day, as well as their peak usage demands. Provide the oversubscription ratios used.

b.

Are different engineering assumptions utilized when planning network deployments/upgrades in different geographic areas, when different technologies are used, or where different speed tiers are offered to end users? If yes, please explain these differences.

c.

For each of the years 2010 to 2014, provide 1) the network engineering assumption for throughput bandwidth allocated to each end user expressed in kilobits per second (kbps) (i.e. engineered throughput), and 2) the average volume of data used per end user expressed in gigabytes (GB) per month.

d.

For each of the years 2015 to 2019, provide the forecasts for the information requested in part c) above.

A.
a.
#
b..
#
c.
#
d.
#
Confidential information:

Information about TekSavvy’s engineering assumptions are intensely confidential, including their extent, their nature, the range and types of assumptions on which they rely.

This technical information is a trade secret. It is not known to anyone, is treated consistently in a confidential manner, and would, if disclosed, prejudice TekSavvy’s competitive position in ways that would result in specific, direct harm to TekSavvy, by giving its competitors and suppliers direct insight into TekSavvy’s technical decisions and approach.

All of TekSavvy’s response to this RFI reveal information regarding TekSavvy’s engineering assumptions. For these reasons, TekSavvy’s response is designated as confidential pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act; in the manner indicated by section 32 of the CRTC Rules of Practice and Procedure; and following the guidelines set out in Procedures for filing confidential information and requesting its disclosure in Commission proceedings, Broadcasting and Telecom Information Bulletin CRTC 2010-961, 3 December 2010.

***End of Document***

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2396745 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - TekSavvy_CRTC_7May15-11 ABRIDGED.doc
CONFIDENTIAL
TekSavvy Solutions Inc.
Response to Request
2 May 2014
TekSavvy(CRTC)28Mar14-17
TNC 2013-551
**** 1 of 1
ABRIDGED
TekSavvy Solutions Inc.
Response to Request
14 July 2015
TekSavvy(CRTC)7May15-11
TNC 2015-134
**** 2 of 2
**** 1 of 2
Q11
[TSPs]

To better understand historical and projected network utilization and demand for broadband Internet access services, provide responses to the following questions.

a.

Describe the various engineering assumptions associated with network deployments/upgrades, such as percentage of active users (i.e. households) at peak periods and at other times of day, as well as their peak usage demands. Provide the oversubscription ratios used.

b.

Are different engineering assumptions utilized when planning network deployments/upgrades in different geographic areas, when different technologies are used, or where different speed tiers are offered to end users? If yes, please explain these differences.

c.

For each of the years 2010 to 2014, provide 1) the network engineering assumption for throughput bandwidth allocated to each end user expressed in kilobits per second (kbps) (i.e. engineered throughput), and 2) the average volume of data used per end user expressed in gigabytes (GB) per month.

d.

For each of the years 2015 to 2019, provide the forecasts for the information requested in part c) above.

A.
a.
#
b..
#
c.
#
d.
#
Confidential information:

Information about TekSavvy’s engineering assumptions are intensely confidential, including their extent, their nature, the range and types of assumptions on which they rely.

This technical information is a trade secret. It is not known to anyone, is treated consistently in a confidential manner, and would, if disclosed, prejudice TekSavvy’s competitive position in ways that would result in specific, direct harm to TekSavvy, by giving its competitors and suppliers direct insight into TekSavvy’s technical decisions and approach.

All of TekSavvy’s response to this RFI reveal information regarding TekSavvy’s engineering assumptions. For these reasons, TekSavvy’s response is designated as confidential pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act; in the manner indicated by section 32 of the CRTC Rules of Practice and Procedure; and following the guidelines set out in Procedures for filing confidential information and requesting its disclosure in Commission proceedings, Broadcasting and Telecom Information Bulletin CRTC 2010-961, 3 December 2010.

***End of Document***

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2396745 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - TekSavvy_CRTC_7May15-11 ABRIDGED.doc
CONFIDENTIAL
TekSavvy Solutions Inc.
Response to Request
2 May 2014
TekSavvy(CRTC)28Mar14-17
TNC 2013-551
**** 1 of 1
ABRIDGED
TekSavvy Solutions Inc.
Response to Request
14 July 2015
TekSavvy(CRTC)7May15-11
TNC 2015-134
**** 2 of 2
**** 1 of 2
Q11
[TSPs]

To better understand historical and projected network utilization and demand for broadband Internet access services, provide responses to the following questions.

a.

Describe the various engineering assumptions associated with network deployments/upgrades, such as percentage of active users (i.e. households) at peak periods and at other times of day, as well as their peak usage demands. Provide the oversubscription ratios used.

b.

Are different engineering assumptions utilized when planning network deployments/upgrades in different geographic areas, when different technologies are used, or where different speed tiers are offered to end users? If yes, please explain these differences.

c.

For each of the years 2010 to 2014, provide 1) the network engineering assumption for throughput bandwidth allocated to each end user expressed in kilobits per second (kbps) (i.e. engineered throughput), and 2) the average volume of data used per end user expressed in gigabytes (GB) per month.

d.

For each of the years 2015 to 2019, provide the forecasts for the information requested in part c) above.

A.
a.
#
b..
#
c.
#
d.
#
Confidential information:

Information about TekSavvy’s engineering assumptions are intensely confidential, including their extent, their nature, the range and types of assumptions on which they rely.

This technical information is a trade secret. It is not known to anyone, is treated consistently in a confidential manner, and would, if disclosed, prejudice TekSavvy’s competitive position in ways that would result in specific, direct harm to TekSavvy, by giving its competitors and suppliers direct insight into TekSavvy’s technical decisions and approach.

All of TekSavvy’s response to this RFI reveal information regarding TekSavvy’s engineering assumptions. For these reasons, TekSavvy’s response is designated as confidential pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act; in the manner indicated by section 32 of the CRTC Rules of Practice and Procedure; and following the guidelines set out in Procedures for filing confidential information and requesting its disclosure in Commission proceedings, Broadcasting and Telecom Information Bulletin CRTC 2010-961, 3 December 2010.

***End of Document***

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2394918 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - Primus(CRTC)7May15-08 TNC 2015-134 Abridged.pdf

Primus Telecommunications Canada Inc. Response to Interrogatory 14 July 2015 Primus(CRTC)7Apr15-08 TNC 2015-134 Abridged

**** 1 of 1
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. With respect to your company’s operating territory, provide the following information for Internet services (excluding dial-up) that you offer:

a) the total number of households that your company is capable of serving;

b) the total number of households served by your company; and c) the total number of households served that meet the Commission’s broadband Internet target speeds of 5 Mbps download / 1 Mbps upload.

A. Primus is filing this interrogatory response in confidence with the Commission pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act. The information for which confidentiality is being claimed contains commercially sensitive information regarding Primus’ network and high-speed Internet access service in Primus’ operating territories. This commercially sensitive information is consistently treated as confidential by Primus, the disclosure of which could prejudice the competitive position of Primus. Primus would suffer specific and direct harm if the information were to be disclosed. An abridged version has been filed for the public record.

a) The total number of households that Primus is capable of serving is # b) The total number of households served by Primus is # c) The total number of households served by Primus that meet the Commission’s broadband Internet target speed of 5Mbps download / 1 Mbps is # # Filed with the Commission in confidence.

***End of Document***

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2394918 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - Primus(CRTC)7May15-08 TNC 2015-134 Abridged.pdf

Primus Telecommunications Canada Inc. Response to Interrogatory 14 July 2015 Primus(CRTC)7Apr15-08 TNC 2015-134 Abridged

**** 1 of 1
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. With respect to your company’s operating territory, provide the following information for Internet services (excluding dial-up) that you offer:

a) the total number of households that your company is capable of serving;

b) the total number of households served by your company; and c) the total number of households served that meet the Commission’s broadband Internet target speeds of 5 Mbps download / 1 Mbps upload.

A. Primus is filing this interrogatory response in confidence with the Commission pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act. The information for which confidentiality is being claimed contains commercially sensitive information regarding Primus’ network and high-speed Internet access service in Primus’ operating territories. This commercially sensitive information is consistently treated as confidential by Primus, the disclosure of which could prejudice the competitive position of Primus. Primus would suffer specific and direct harm if the information were to be disclosed. An abridged version has been filed for the public record.

a) The total number of households that Primus is capable of serving is # b) The total number of households served by Primus is # c) The total number of households served by Primus that meet the Commission’s broadband Internet target speed of 5Mbps download / 1 Mbps is # # Filed with the Commission in confidence.

***End of Document***

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2394918 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - Primus(CRTC)7May15-08 TNC 2015-134 Abridged.pdf

Primus Telecommunications Canada Inc. Response to Interrogatory 14 July 2015 Primus(CRTC)7Apr15-08 TNC 2015-134 Abridged

**** 1 of 1
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. With respect to your company’s operating territory, provide the following information for Internet services (excluding dial-up) that you offer:

a) the total number of households that your company is capable of serving;

b) the total number of households served by your company; and c) the total number of households served that meet the Commission’s broadband Internet target speeds of 5 Mbps download / 1 Mbps upload.

A. Primus is filing this interrogatory response in confidence with the Commission pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act. The information for which confidentiality is being claimed contains commercially sensitive information regarding Primus’ network and high-speed Internet access service in Primus’ operating territories. This commercially sensitive information is consistently treated as confidential by Primus, the disclosure of which could prejudice the competitive position of Primus. Primus would suffer specific and direct harm if the information were to be disclosed. An abridged version has been filed for the public record.

a) The total number of households that Primus is capable of serving is # b) The total number of households served by Primus is # c) The total number of households served by Primus that meet the Commission’s broadband Internet target speed of 5Mbps download / 1 Mbps is # # Filed with the Commission in confidence.

***End of Document***

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2394918 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - Primus(CRTC)7May15-08 TNC 2015-134 Abridged.pdf

Primus Telecommunications Canada Inc. Response to Interrogatory 14 July 2015 Primus(CRTC)7Apr15-08 TNC 2015-134 Abridged

**** 1 of 1
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. With respect to your company’s operating territory, provide the following information for Internet services (excluding dial-up) that you offer:

a) the total number of households that your company is capable of serving;

b) the total number of households served by your company; and c) the total number of households served that meet the Commission’s broadband Internet target speeds of 5 Mbps download / 1 Mbps upload.

A. Primus is filing this interrogatory response in confidence with the Commission pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act. The information for which confidentiality is being claimed contains commercially sensitive information regarding Primus’ network and high-speed Internet access service in Primus’ operating territories. This commercially sensitive information is consistently treated as confidential by Primus, the disclosure of which could prejudice the competitive position of Primus. Primus would suffer specific and direct harm if the information were to be disclosed. An abridged version has been filed for the public record.

a) The total number of households that Primus is capable of serving is # b) The total number of households served by Primus is # c) The total number of households served by Primus that meet the Commission’s broadband Internet target speed of 5Mbps download / 1 Mbps is # # Filed with the Commission in confidence.

***End of Document***

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2395411 - 2015-134 - Responses to request for information - DCL response to CRTC 07May15_1ABRIDGED.pdf

DISTRIBUTEL COMMUNICATIONS LIMITED Response to Interrogatory ABRIDGED

14 July 2015 DISTRIBUTEL (CRTC) 07May15-1 TNC 2015-134 **** 1 of 1

**** 1 of 2
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. Identify the number and corresponding percentage of residential customers subscribing to the services listed below as of December 2014 by each province/territory where the company provides service:

a. the lowest priced wireline voice service; and b. the lowest priced postpaid mobile wireless voice plan.

For each service, specify the percentage of customers located in i) high cost serving areas (HCSAs) and ii) non-HCSAs. Provide a description of each service offering (e.g.

optional services or enhanced features; number of local minutes for daytime, evenings, and weekends; long distance minutes; number of text messages included). Specify 1) the non-discounted price for each service, 2) whether the price is available throughout the province/territory providing the reasons for any differences, and 3) any additional monthly charges that may apply.

A. Distributel’s response to this interrogatory is filed in confidence with the Commission pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act. Release of this information, which is consistently treated in a confidential manner by Distributel, would cause specific direct harm to Distributel by providing existing and potential competitors with invaluable competitively-sensitive information, thereby enabling them to develop business strategies to more effectively compete with Distributel. An abridged version is provided for the public record.

a. i) and ii) Distributel offers residential access independent local VOIP service in the Provinces of Alberta, British Columbia, Ontario and Quebec. The lowest priced residential wireline voice service offered is the Basic Phone Service in each of the provinces. Distributel has used the exchange of the customer TN to identify the customer location.

Province
Lowest
****
Wireline
Service
Number of
Customers
subscribed
to Basic
Phone
Service
% of
Customers
located in
HCSA
% of
customers
in non-
HCSA
Non-
discounted
price
****
available
throughout
the province
Additional
monthly
charges
Alberta Basic # # # # # #
British
Columbia
Basic # # # # # #
Ontario Basic # # # # # #
Quebec Basic # # # # # #
***END OF DOCUMENT***

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2395411 - 2015-134 - Responses to request for information - DCL response to CRTC 07May15_1ABRIDGED.pdf

DISTRIBUTEL COMMUNICATIONS LIMITED Response to Interrogatory ABRIDGED

14 July 2015 DISTRIBUTEL (CRTC) 07May15-1 TNC 2015-134 **** 1 of 1

**** 1 of 2
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. Identify the number and corresponding percentage of residential customers subscribing to the services listed below as of December 2014 by each province/territory where the company provides service:

a. the lowest priced wireline voice service; and b. the lowest priced postpaid mobile wireless voice plan.

For each service, specify the percentage of customers located in i) high cost serving areas (HCSAs) and ii) non-HCSAs. Provide a description of each service offering (e.g.

optional services or enhanced features; number of local minutes for daytime, evenings, and weekends; long distance minutes; number of text messages included). Specify 1) the non-discounted price for each service, 2) whether the price is available throughout the province/territory providing the reasons for any differences, and 3) any additional monthly charges that may apply.

A. Distributel’s response to this interrogatory is filed in confidence with the Commission pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act. Release of this information, which is consistently treated in a confidential manner by Distributel, would cause specific direct harm to Distributel by providing existing and potential competitors with invaluable competitively-sensitive information, thereby enabling them to develop business strategies to more effectively compete with Distributel. An abridged version is provided for the public record.

a. i) and ii) Distributel offers residential access independent local VOIP service in the Provinces of Alberta, British Columbia, Ontario and Quebec. The lowest priced residential wireline voice service offered is the Basic Phone Service in each of the provinces. Distributel has used the exchange of the customer TN to identify the customer location.

Province
Lowest
****
Wireline
Service
Number of
Customers
subscribed
to Basic
Phone
Service
% of
Customers
located in
HCSA
% of
customers
in non-
HCSA
Non-
discounted
price
****
available
throughout
the province
Additional
monthly
charges
Alberta Basic # # # # # #
British
Columbia
Basic # # # # # #
Ontario Basic # # # # # #
Quebec Basic # # # # # #
***END OF DOCUMENT***

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2395411 - 2015-134 - Responses to request for information - DCL response to CRTC 07May15_1ABRIDGED.pdf

DISTRIBUTEL COMMUNICATIONS LIMITED Response to Interrogatory ABRIDGED

14 July 2015 DISTRIBUTEL (CRTC) 07May15-1 TNC 2015-134 **** 1 of 1

**** 1 of 2
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. Identify the number and corresponding percentage of residential customers subscribing to the services listed below as of December 2014 by each province/territory where the company provides service:

a. the lowest priced wireline voice service; and b. the lowest priced postpaid mobile wireless voice plan.

For each service, specify the percentage of customers located in i) high cost serving areas (HCSAs) and ii) non-HCSAs. Provide a description of each service offering (e.g.

optional services or enhanced features; number of local minutes for daytime, evenings, and weekends; long distance minutes; number of text messages included). Specify 1) the non-discounted price for each service, 2) whether the price is available throughout the province/territory providing the reasons for any differences, and 3) any additional monthly charges that may apply.

A. Distributel’s response to this interrogatory is filed in confidence with the Commission pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act. Release of this information, which is consistently treated in a confidential manner by Distributel, would cause specific direct harm to Distributel by providing existing and potential competitors with invaluable competitively-sensitive information, thereby enabling them to develop business strategies to more effectively compete with Distributel. An abridged version is provided for the public record.

a. i) and ii) Distributel offers residential access independent local VOIP service in the Provinces of Alberta, British Columbia, Ontario and Quebec. The lowest priced residential wireline voice service offered is the Basic Phone Service in each of the provinces. Distributel has used the exchange of the customer TN to identify the customer location.

Province
Lowest
****
Wireline
Service
Number of
Customers
subscribed
to Basic
Phone
Service
% of
Customers
located in
HCSA
% of
customers
in non-
HCSA
Non-
discounted
price
****
available
throughout
the province
Additional
monthly
charges
Alberta Basic # # # # # #
British
Columbia
Basic # # # # # #
Ontario Basic # # # # # #
Quebec Basic # # # # # #
***END OF DOCUMENT***

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2395411 - 2015-134 - Responses to request for information - DCL response to CRTC 07May15_1ABRIDGED.pdf

DISTRIBUTEL COMMUNICATIONS LIMITED Response to Interrogatory ABRIDGED

14 July 2015 DISTRIBUTEL (CRTC) 07May15-1 TNC 2015-134 **** 1 of 1

**** 1 of 2
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. Identify the number and corresponding percentage of residential customers subscribing to the services listed below as of December 2014 by each province/territory where the company provides service:

a. the lowest priced wireline voice service; and b. the lowest priced postpaid mobile wireless voice plan.

For each service, specify the percentage of customers located in i) high cost serving areas (HCSAs) and ii) non-HCSAs. Provide a description of each service offering (e.g.

optional services or enhanced features; number of local minutes for daytime, evenings, and weekends; long distance minutes; number of text messages included). Specify 1) the non-discounted price for each service, 2) whether the price is available throughout the province/territory providing the reasons for any differences, and 3) any additional monthly charges that may apply.

A. Distributel’s response to this interrogatory is filed in confidence with the Commission pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act. Release of this information, which is consistently treated in a confidential manner by Distributel, would cause specific direct harm to Distributel by providing existing and potential competitors with invaluable competitively-sensitive information, thereby enabling them to develop business strategies to more effectively compete with Distributel. An abridged version is provided for the public record.

a. i) and ii) Distributel offers residential access independent local VOIP service in the Provinces of Alberta, British Columbia, Ontario and Quebec. The lowest priced residential wireline voice service offered is the Basic Phone Service in each of the provinces. Distributel has used the exchange of the customer TN to identify the customer location.

Province
Lowest
****
Wireline
Service
Number of
Customers
subscribed
to Basic
Phone
Service
% of
Customers
located in
HCSA
% of
customers
in non-
HCSA
Non-
discounted
price
****
available
throughout
the province
Additional
monthly
charges
Alberta Basic # # # # # #
British
Columbia
Basic # # # # # #
Ontario Basic # # # # # #
Quebec Basic # # # # # #
***END OF DOCUMENT***

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2395599 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - 150714-The Companies-CRTC-7May15-7 TNC 2015-134.doc
Bell Canada/Bell Mobility Inc./DMTS/KMTS/
Response to Request
NorthernTel, Limited Partnership/Northwestel Inc./
The Companies(CRTC)7May15-7 TNC 2015-134
Ontera/Télébec, Société en commandite
**** 8 of 11
14 July 2015
Telecommunications Services
Q.
[TSPs]

For each category of telecommunications service (i.e. wireline voice, mobile wireless voice, wireline Internet, mobile wireless Internet, fixed wireless Internet and satellite Internet) provided by your company, identify and describe what service offerings (e.g. discounted plans, special pricing) or initiatives (e.g. bill management tools, toll denial) are available to assist certain segments of the population for which access or affordability may be a concern, such as seniors, low income Canadians, people with disabilities, and students. Describe any other similar offerings or initiatives that are available to other specific segments of the population. Provide for the year 2014, the number and percentage of customers who used these offerings or initiatives.

A. We submit this response on behalf of Bell Aliant Regional Communications, Limited Partnership (which effective 1 July 2015 was wound-up into Bell Canada, and is now operated as a division of Bell Canada), Bell Canada, Bell Mobility Inc., Câblevision du Nord du Québec inc. (CVQ), DMTS, KMTS, NorthernTel, Limited Partnership, Northwestel Inc., Ontera and Télébec, Société en commandite. The response generally applies to all of the listed TSPs except where noted otherwise.

We are submitting certain information contained in the Attachment to this response in confidence.

Specifically, we are submitting usage figures concerning the number of users, and the percentage of our user base that they represent, in confidence. This represents competitively sensitive information about our service offerings that is consistently treated in a confidential manner, and which would not ordinarily be made available to our competitors. The release of this information could cause material harm to our business. We are providing an abridged version of the Attachment for the public record.

We have generally focused this response to describe services and initiatives that are specifically designed to address the needs of customer groups such as those identified in the above question. We have also included a few services that are available to all customers that also address the needs of some or all of the above-named groups.

Beyond the services and initiatives listed below in this response, we also wish to note that our customers are able to leverage our wide range of service offerings to customize their service(s) in a way that best suits their needs, but in a way that cannot be tracked. For example, a customer may choose a particular mobile handset because it offers a volume control that works well with a hearing aid, or it offers a visual indicator for incoming messages that works well for someone with a hearing disability. Given the range of products and services that we offer, and the varying reasons customers may choose them, we cannot provide any insight into why customers may be selecting one service or product over another; however, we do note that the characteristics of our various products appeal to different customers for different reasons, and allow customers to maximize the value of their services.

The services forming the more direct focus of this response are described below and are grouped based on the user segment that we feel the various initiatives most directly serve. Details concerning the specific offerings, the technologies on which they are provided, and the level of usage each offering received in 2014, are shown in the Attachment.

Services primarily used by disabled users

We offer a wide range of telecommunications services for customers with hearing, speech, visual and other physical disabilities. Bell Canada undertakes a variety of activities and consultations with organizations to ensure that it is informed about the challenges faced by persons with disabilities with respect to access to telecommunications products and services, their needs with respect to accessibility and the solutions that can be used to accommodate those needs. Further, we have a pending proposal before the Commission to further enhance our wireless services for customers with disabilities, through specific initiatives to address the following four areas:

a)
The sourcing and packaging of mobile devices and applications to address accessibility needs;
b)
Education and awareness of Bell accessible mobile products and services;
c)
The creation of web tools to support accessible mobile handsets, applications, and accessory selection; and
d)

Improvements to Company operations and client support tools and processes to support Bell's accessibility initiatives and provide lifecycle management of the accessibility program to ensure it is sustainable in the future.

1. Message Relay Service (MRS) and IP Relay Service (IPRS)

MRS and IPRS are tools that make telephone communications accessible for Deaf, hard of hearing and speech-impaired (DHHSI) customers. In a traditional MRS call, a user who has difficulty hearing and/or speaking types written messages to an operator by using a teletypewriter (TTY) machine. The operator facilities the telephone call by voicing the messages typed by the party using the TTY machine, and typing spoken responses back to the TTY user. MRS operators also assist customers in placing Voice Carry Over (VCO) and Hearing Carry Over (HCO) calls. IPRS is similar in nature, but instead of a TTY machine, an Internet-based chat application is used to transmit written messages back and forth between the operator and the called parties. **** MRS and IPRS are available to customers 24 hours a day, seven days a week in **** and ****.

MRS and IPRS both make telecommunications more affordable for relay users. For example, our customers are able to place free local and long distance calls within Canada using IPRS, and are entitled to either free Canadian long distance, or substantive discounts on long distance, when using MRS.

2. Text with 9-1-1 (T9-1-1)

The T9-1-1 service is designed to allow DHHSI users to connect to a 9-1-1 call centre using text messages. T9-1-1 provides 9-1-1 call centres with the ability to converse with a DHHSI person during an emergency, using text messaging. When a DHHSI person requires 9-1-1 services, they dial 9-1-1 on their cell phone. There is no need for them to speak, as the 9-1-1 call taker will receive an indicator that tells them to communicate with the caller via text messaging. The 9-1-1 call taker then initiates text messaging with the caller to address the emergency. A DHHSI person must register for T9-1-1 with their wireless service provider and must have an eligible cell phone before being able to utilize this service. This includes the ability to send and receive text messages.

This service is currently available in certain areas of our territories and is being expanded to new areas on a continual basis as additional Public Safety Answering Points (PSAPs) indicate their readiness to receive such texts. Customers can track the availability of T9-1-1 via the textwith911.ca website, at http://textwith911.ca/service-availability/. This service greatly improves access to emergency services for DHHSI users.

3. In-store interpreters

Upon request, Bell makes available a sign-language interpreter to assist with the in-store experience in our Bell World stores. In order to obtain live interpretation services, a written request must be placed to and approved by ******@***.com. A sign language interpreter will be made available for customers requiring technical assistance with a Bell product (to resolve an issue that can be addressed by store staff) or to assist a customer in obtaining new Bell services. In these situations, in-store interpreters can make our products and services more accessible to persons whose primary mode of communication is sign-language and if they choose to use the service, by facilitating the exchange of information with the aim of ensuring that the customer has a clear understanding of the products and services sought.

4. Dedicated accessibility contact centre

Bell maintains specialized contact centres to assist with accessibility related inquiries. In Atlantic Canada, a specialized group of agents assists consumers with questions related to MRS and IPRS. In Ontario and Quebec, customers with accessibility questions on any of our products and services can reach the Accessibility Services Centre Monday through Friday between the hours of 8:30am and 5:00pm. The Accessibility Services Centre handles inquiries and provides assistance with all initiatives and offerings described in this response.

5. Payphones
Each of the Bell Companies provides payphone service that offers features that enhance accessibility for persons with disabilities.
Specifically,
-
all payphones are hearing-aid compatible;
-
all payphones provide connectability and signal compatibility for customer-provided portable TTYs and VCO devices;
-
many payphones are equipped with TTY capabilities or separate TTY keyboards;
-
all payphones allow connection to MRS (local calls from payphones which use MRS are free of charge, and toll calls are at reduced rates);
-
each Millennium payphone has a volume control button; and
-
some payphones (for example, Millennium desk-top phones) have built-in data jacks which can be connected to a portable computer.
Payphones also allow customers to place local calls of unlimited duration at a defined, regulated rate.
6. Operator assisted calling discounts

Operators will place local calls free of charge, waive the surcharge associated with placing operator-assisted long distance calls, and navigate Interactive Voice Response (IVR) systems for customers with disabilities and seniors who require assistance.

7. Directory assistance fee exemption

Bell's customers with disabilities and seniors are exempt from paying local and long distance Directory Assistance charges from any location.

8. **** phone discount

Bell provides a discount of $1.90/month off the standard service rate for home phone service to registered disabled customers. Télébec offers a discount from its regular ****-Tone rate for disabled customers.

9. Accessible billing formats

We provide consumers with bills in alternate, accessible formats upon request. Alternate formats may include Braille, large print, audio bills, or electronic bills. Registration may be required to receive these services.

10. Website dedicated to accessibility features

Bell Canada maintains a specific website (www.bell.ca/accessibility) that provides easy access to detailed information concerning all accessible products and services, as well as contact information for the Bell Accessibility Services Centre. The other Bell companies generally maintain website pages with information on products and services specifically for users with special needs. These websites are generally maintained to W3C WCAG 2.0 AA Level accessibility standards. Our accessibility services can be easily located by a prominent link on our main website landing pages. Links to our accessibility webpages are as follows:

· http://www.bellaliant.net/home-phone-services/special-needs
· http://www.telebec.com/ (click on link "services d'accessibilité")
· http://northerntel.ca/ntlathome/default_accessibility.htm
· http://dmts.biz/accessibility-services/
· http://kmts.ca/support/accessibility-services/
11. Voice-activated dialling

Voice-activated dialling provides for placing a telephone call by speaking the name of the desired party into the telephone transmitter. This feature is available to individual-line customers with a personal voice directory of user inputted names and associated numbers. Customers can record 100 voice contacts through their phone and store 1,000 contacts in the Web application, and they can store up to five phone numbers per contact. Customers can dial a number that's not in their contact list by saying "Dial" or "Call" and then the phone number. This service can be helpful for people with mobility, cognitive or vision issues.

12. Loud volume ringer and strobe lights

This service assists customers who require an extra loud ringer and/or a strobe light to help them identify incoming telephone calls. These features can be obtained through Bell Aliant.

Services that assist low-income users

In addition to the packages and rate plans described in our responses to The Companies(CRTC)7May15-1 and -2 TNC 2015-134, and our promotional offers and bundled services that are generally available to all customers, we offer a number of specific bill management tools that can assist low-income users in managing the cost of their services. The following services are available to all customers with no criteria for eligibility, but may be of particular interest to customers seeking to limit or reduce the cost of their service.

1. **** management tools (i.e., **** Distance, Directory Assistance, Collect Call, Pay-per-use, 1-900 Restrictions)

We offer a number of options that customers may use with their home phone services to exclude the use of pay-per-use (PPU) features or long distance charges. The option to not access PPU features and/or long distance calling gives customers more certainty and control over their monthly bills and serves as an important bill management tool. The specific options that may be added are as follows:

· **** distance calling restriction: This prevents out-going long distance calls from being placed from the telephone line.

· Collect calling (and 3rd Party Calling) block: This prevents collect calls or 3rd party billed calls from being placed or billed to a telephone line, eliminating unwanted charges.

· Directory assistance: This prevents out-going calls from connecting to the 411 Directory Assistance service, which incurs a fee for use. This also prevents access to Automatic Directory Assistance Call Completion service.

· PPU features block: This prevents the use of PPU features such as:
· Call return (*69)
· Busy call return (*66)
· Call trace (*57)
· Three way calling (*71)
· 1-900 block: This prevents out-going calls to 1-900 services that incur charges.
There is generally no charge to add toll restriction or 900 Call Blocking to the customer's line, or to block access to PPU features.
2. Internet usage notification

On wireless service packages, we send customers messages when they have used 75% of their monthly data usage. Wireline Internet customers are also provided with usage notifications by email where we have an email address on file. This allows customers to manage their usage and avoid any unexpected charges. In Atlantic Canada, for wireline Internet, there are no usage caps.

3. Special payment terms

Customers who are experiencing difficulty paying their bills may contact us to discuss ways to reduce their bill by optimizing their account or removing unnecessary products and services. For those in arrears, we arrange special repayment schedules to help the customer manage payments. This allows customers to continue to receive services in a manner that accommodates their financial situation.

In order to assist customers who subscribe to single-line service with the up-front costs of installing service, we offer an Installment **** Provision (IPP). The IPP allows customers of single-line service to pay Service Charges in six equal monthly payments.

Services that specifically assist seniors
We offer a number of services that specifically assist seniors:
1. Operator assisted calling discounts

As stated above, operators will place local calls free of charge, waive the surcharge associated with placing operator-assisted long distance calls, and navigate Interactive Voice Response (IVR) systems for customers with disabilities and seniors who require assistance.

2. Directory assistance fee exemption

As stated above, Bell in Ontario, Quebec and Newfoundland and Labrador provides seniors with an exemption from paying local and long distance Directory Assistance charges from any location.

3. Special jacks for medical alarm and response systems

A special 8-pin jack is required in order for medical alarm, life line services to be installed for a customer, such as those available through the Canadian Red **** and Direct Alert. We will install the special jack for the customer upon request, for the same charge as a regular jack, helping facilitate the provision of these services.

Services that specifically assist students

We offer a number of promotions specifically developed to assist students, particularly with respect to Internet services. For example, Bell Canada typically runs a promotion on stand-alone Internet each year during the back to school season. These promotions typically provide subscribers with a discounted service rate for eight months, without a contract period. This allows the promotion to cover the entire school year. These promotions also often include higher bandwidth amounts than typical packages and may waive activation fees. Promotions vary across each province. In Atlantic Canada, Bell Aliant similarly offers promotions for students each fall for stand-alone Internet services. These promotions are also dynamic and change from year to year, but generally involve promotional pricing lasting 12 months in duration without a contract period, and may include the waiving of certain fees, such modem charges, activation fees or stand-alone Internet surcharges.

With respect to mobile services, students are able to take advantage of our family share plans. These plans allow family members to share data amongst a number of users or devices. Students may also choose to subscribe to our pre-paid wireless plans. Pre-paid plans offer students, amongst other customers, the ability to manage their wireless costs easily and efficiently.[1]*** End of Document ***

� This information is filed in confidence with the Commission pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act and the directions provided by the Commission in the Appendix to Broadcasting and Telecom Information Bulletin CRTC 2010-961, Procedures for filing confidential information and requesting its disclosure in Commission proceedings, dated 23 December 2010, as amended in Broadcasting and Telecom Information Bulletin CRTC 2010-961-1, dated 26 October 2012.

� These features are offered on Millennium payphones.

� Bell Canada is fully compliant with the Commission's directives to upgrade the availability of TTYs at pay telephones pursuant to Telecom Decision CRTC 2004-47 (Decision 2007-47), Access to pay telephone service as modified by Telecom decision CRTC 2007-12, Bell Aliant Regional Communications, Limited Partnership and Bell Canada – Application to extend certain time frames to equip pay telephones with teletypewriter units, established in Decision 2004-47.

� CRTC 21491 Item 255.4, and CRTC 6716 Item 90.7, for example.
[1] See The Companies(CRTC)7May15-2 for more information about our pre-paid plans.

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2395599 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - 150714-The Companies-CRTC-7May15-7 TNC 2015-134.doc
Bell Canada/Bell Mobility Inc./DMTS/KMTS/
Response to Request
NorthernTel, Limited Partnership/Northwestel Inc./
The Companies(CRTC)7May15-7 TNC 2015-134
Ontera/Télébec, Société en commandite
**** 8 of 11
14 July 2015
Telecommunications Services
Q.
[TSPs]

For each category of telecommunications service (i.e. wireline voice, mobile wireless voice, wireline Internet, mobile wireless Internet, fixed wireless Internet and satellite Internet) provided by your company, identify and describe what service offerings (e.g. discounted plans, special pricing) or initiatives (e.g. bill management tools, toll denial) are available to assist certain segments of the population for which access or affordability may be a concern, such as seniors, low income Canadians, people with disabilities, and students. Describe any other similar offerings or initiatives that are available to other specific segments of the population. Provide for the year 2014, the number and percentage of customers who used these offerings or initiatives.

A. We submit this response on behalf of Bell Aliant Regional Communications, Limited Partnership (which effective 1 July 2015 was wound-up into Bell Canada, and is now operated as a division of Bell Canada), Bell Canada, Bell Mobility Inc., Câblevision du Nord du Québec inc. (CVQ), DMTS, KMTS, NorthernTel, Limited Partnership, Northwestel Inc., Ontera and Télébec, Société en commandite. The response generally applies to all of the listed TSPs except where noted otherwise.

We are submitting certain information contained in the Attachment to this response in confidence.

Specifically, we are submitting usage figures concerning the number of users, and the percentage of our user base that they represent, in confidence. This represents competitively sensitive information about our service offerings that is consistently treated in a confidential manner, and which would not ordinarily be made available to our competitors. The release of this information could cause material harm to our business. We are providing an abridged version of the Attachment for the public record.

We have generally focused this response to describe services and initiatives that are specifically designed to address the needs of customer groups such as those identified in the above question. We have also included a few services that are available to all customers that also address the needs of some or all of the above-named groups.

Beyond the services and initiatives listed below in this response, we also wish to note that our customers are able to leverage our wide range of service offerings to customize their service(s) in a way that best suits their needs, but in a way that cannot be tracked. For example, a customer may choose a particular mobile handset because it offers a volume control that works well with a hearing aid, or it offers a visual indicator for incoming messages that works well for someone with a hearing disability. Given the range of products and services that we offer, and the varying reasons customers may choose them, we cannot provide any insight into why customers may be selecting one service or product over another; however, we do note that the characteristics of our various products appeal to different customers for different reasons, and allow customers to maximize the value of their services.

The services forming the more direct focus of this response are described below and are grouped based on the user segment that we feel the various initiatives most directly serve. Details concerning the specific offerings, the technologies on which they are provided, and the level of usage each offering received in 2014, are shown in the Attachment.

Services primarily used by disabled users

We offer a wide range of telecommunications services for customers with hearing, speech, visual and other physical disabilities. Bell Canada undertakes a variety of activities and consultations with organizations to ensure that it is informed about the challenges faced by persons with disabilities with respect to access to telecommunications products and services, their needs with respect to accessibility and the solutions that can be used to accommodate those needs. Further, we have a pending proposal before the Commission to further enhance our wireless services for customers with disabilities, through specific initiatives to address the following four areas:

a)
The sourcing and packaging of mobile devices and applications to address accessibility needs;
b)
Education and awareness of Bell accessible mobile products and services;
c)
The creation of web tools to support accessible mobile handsets, applications, and accessory selection; and
d)

Improvements to Company operations and client support tools and processes to support Bell's accessibility initiatives and provide lifecycle management of the accessibility program to ensure it is sustainable in the future.

1. Message Relay Service (MRS) and IP Relay Service (IPRS)

MRS and IPRS are tools that make telephone communications accessible for Deaf, hard of hearing and speech-impaired (DHHSI) customers. In a traditional MRS call, a user who has difficulty hearing and/or speaking types written messages to an operator by using a teletypewriter (TTY) machine. The operator facilities the telephone call by voicing the messages typed by the party using the TTY machine, and typing spoken responses back to the TTY user. MRS operators also assist customers in placing Voice Carry Over (VCO) and Hearing Carry Over (HCO) calls. IPRS is similar in nature, but instead of a TTY machine, an Internet-based chat application is used to transmit written messages back and forth between the operator and the called parties. **** MRS and IPRS are available to customers 24 hours a day, seven days a week in **** and ****.

MRS and IPRS both make telecommunications more affordable for relay users. For example, our customers are able to place free local and long distance calls within Canada using IPRS, and are entitled to either free Canadian long distance, or substantive discounts on long distance, when using MRS.

2. Text with 9-1-1 (T9-1-1)

The T9-1-1 service is designed to allow DHHSI users to connect to a 9-1-1 call centre using text messages. T9-1-1 provides 9-1-1 call centres with the ability to converse with a DHHSI person during an emergency, using text messaging. When a DHHSI person requires 9-1-1 services, they dial 9-1-1 on their cell phone. There is no need for them to speak, as the 9-1-1 call taker will receive an indicator that tells them to communicate with the caller via text messaging. The 9-1-1 call taker then initiates text messaging with the caller to address the emergency. A DHHSI person must register for T9-1-1 with their wireless service provider and must have an eligible cell phone before being able to utilize this service. This includes the ability to send and receive text messages.

This service is currently available in certain areas of our territories and is being expanded to new areas on a continual basis as additional Public Safety Answering Points (PSAPs) indicate their readiness to receive such texts. Customers can track the availability of T9-1-1 via the textwith911.ca website, at http://textwith911.ca/service-availability/. This service greatly improves access to emergency services for DHHSI users.

3. In-store interpreters

Upon request, Bell makes available a sign-language interpreter to assist with the in-store experience in our Bell World stores. In order to obtain live interpretation services, a written request must be placed to and approved by ******@***.com. A sign language interpreter will be made available for customers requiring technical assistance with a Bell product (to resolve an issue that can be addressed by store staff) or to assist a customer in obtaining new Bell services. In these situations, in-store interpreters can make our products and services more accessible to persons whose primary mode of communication is sign-language and if they choose to use the service, by facilitating the exchange of information with the aim of ensuring that the customer has a clear understanding of the products and services sought.

4. Dedicated accessibility contact centre

Bell maintains specialized contact centres to assist with accessibility related inquiries. In Atlantic Canada, a specialized group of agents assists consumers with questions related to MRS and IPRS. In Ontario and Quebec, customers with accessibility questions on any of our products and services can reach the Accessibility Services Centre Monday through Friday between the hours of 8:30am and 5:00pm. The Accessibility Services Centre handles inquiries and provides assistance with all initiatives and offerings described in this response.

5. Payphones
Each of the Bell Companies provides payphone service that offers features that enhance accessibility for persons with disabilities.
Specifically,
-
all payphones are hearing-aid compatible;
-
all payphones provide connectability and signal compatibility for customer-provided portable TTYs and VCO devices;
-
many payphones are equipped with TTY capabilities or separate TTY keyboards;
-
all payphones allow connection to MRS (local calls from payphones which use MRS are free of charge, and toll calls are at reduced rates);
-
each Millennium payphone has a volume control button; and
-
some payphones (for example, Millennium desk-top phones) have built-in data jacks which can be connected to a portable computer.
Payphones also allow customers to place local calls of unlimited duration at a defined, regulated rate.
6. Operator assisted calling discounts

Operators will place local calls free of charge, waive the surcharge associated with placing operator-assisted long distance calls, and navigate Interactive Voice Response (IVR) systems for customers with disabilities and seniors who require assistance.

7. Directory assistance fee exemption

Bell's customers with disabilities and seniors are exempt from paying local and long distance Directory Assistance charges from any location.

8. **** phone discount

Bell provides a discount of $1.90/month off the standard service rate for home phone service to registered disabled customers. Télébec offers a discount from its regular ****-Tone rate for disabled customers.

9. Accessible billing formats

We provide consumers with bills in alternate, accessible formats upon request. Alternate formats may include Braille, large print, audio bills, or electronic bills. Registration may be required to receive these services.

10. Website dedicated to accessibility features

Bell Canada maintains a specific website (www.bell.ca/accessibility) that provides easy access to detailed information concerning all accessible products and services, as well as contact information for the Bell Accessibility Services Centre. The other Bell companies generally maintain website pages with information on products and services specifically for users with special needs. These websites are generally maintained to W3C WCAG 2.0 AA Level accessibility standards. Our accessibility services can be easily located by a prominent link on our main website landing pages. Links to our accessibility webpages are as follows:

· http://www.bellaliant.net/home-phone-services/special-needs
· http://www.telebec.com/ (click on link "services d'accessibilité")
· http://northerntel.ca/ntlathome/default_accessibility.htm
· http://dmts.biz/accessibility-services/
· http://kmts.ca/support/accessibility-services/
11. Voice-activated dialling

Voice-activated dialling provides for placing a telephone call by speaking the name of the desired party into the telephone transmitter. This feature is available to individual-line customers with a personal voice directory of user inputted names and associated numbers. Customers can record 100 voice contacts through their phone and store 1,000 contacts in the Web application, and they can store up to five phone numbers per contact. Customers can dial a number that's not in their contact list by saying "Dial" or "Call" and then the phone number. This service can be helpful for people with mobility, cognitive or vision issues.

12. Loud volume ringer and strobe lights

This service assists customers who require an extra loud ringer and/or a strobe light to help them identify incoming telephone calls. These features can be obtained through Bell Aliant.

Services that assist low-income users

In addition to the packages and rate plans described in our responses to The Companies(CRTC)7May15-1 and -2 TNC 2015-134, and our promotional offers and bundled services that are generally available to all customers, we offer a number of specific bill management tools that can assist low-income users in managing the cost of their services. The following services are available to all customers with no criteria for eligibility, but may be of particular interest to customers seeking to limit or reduce the cost of their service.

1. **** management tools (i.e., **** Distance, Directory Assistance, Collect Call, Pay-per-use, 1-900 Restrictions)

We offer a number of options that customers may use with their home phone services to exclude the use of pay-per-use (PPU) features or long distance charges. The option to not access PPU features and/or long distance calling gives customers more certainty and control over their monthly bills and serves as an important bill management tool. The specific options that may be added are as follows:

· **** distance calling restriction: This prevents out-going long distance calls from being placed from the telephone line.

· Collect calling (and 3rd Party Calling) block: This prevents collect calls or 3rd party billed calls from being placed or billed to a telephone line, eliminating unwanted charges.

· Directory assistance: This prevents out-going calls from connecting to the 411 Directory Assistance service, which incurs a fee for use. This also prevents access to Automatic Directory Assistance Call Completion service.

· PPU features block: This prevents the use of PPU features such as:
· Call return (*69)
· Busy call return (*66)
· Call trace (*57)
· Three way calling (*71)
· 1-900 block: This prevents out-going calls to 1-900 services that incur charges.
There is generally no charge to add toll restriction or 900 Call Blocking to the customer's line, or to block access to PPU features.
2. Internet usage notification

On wireless service packages, we send customers messages when they have used 75% of their monthly data usage. Wireline Internet customers are also provided with usage notifications by email where we have an email address on file. This allows customers to manage their usage and avoid any unexpected charges. In Atlantic Canada, for wireline Internet, there are no usage caps.

3. Special payment terms

Customers who are experiencing difficulty paying their bills may contact us to discuss ways to reduce their bill by optimizing their account or removing unnecessary products and services. For those in arrears, we arrange special repayment schedules to help the customer manage payments. This allows customers to continue to receive services in a manner that accommodates their financial situation.

In order to assist customers who subscribe to single-line service with the up-front costs of installing service, we offer an Installment **** Provision (IPP). The IPP allows customers of single-line service to pay Service Charges in six equal monthly payments.

Services that specifically assist seniors
We offer a number of services that specifically assist seniors:
1. Operator assisted calling discounts

As stated above, operators will place local calls free of charge, waive the surcharge associated with placing operator-assisted long distance calls, and navigate Interactive Voice Response (IVR) systems for customers with disabilities and seniors who require assistance.

2. Directory assistance fee exemption

As stated above, Bell in Ontario, Quebec and Newfoundland and Labrador provides seniors with an exemption from paying local and long distance Directory Assistance charges from any location.

3. Special jacks for medical alarm and response systems

A special 8-pin jack is required in order for medical alarm, life line services to be installed for a customer, such as those available through the Canadian Red **** and Direct Alert. We will install the special jack for the customer upon request, for the same charge as a regular jack, helping facilitate the provision of these services.

Services that specifically assist students

We offer a number of promotions specifically developed to assist students, particularly with respect to Internet services. For example, Bell Canada typically runs a promotion on stand-alone Internet each year during the back to school season. These promotions typically provide subscribers with a discounted service rate for eight months, without a contract period. This allows the promotion to cover the entire school year. These promotions also often include higher bandwidth amounts than typical packages and may waive activation fees. Promotions vary across each province. In Atlantic Canada, Bell Aliant similarly offers promotions for students each fall for stand-alone Internet services. These promotions are also dynamic and change from year to year, but generally involve promotional pricing lasting 12 months in duration without a contract period, and may include the waiving of certain fees, such modem charges, activation fees or stand-alone Internet surcharges.

With respect to mobile services, students are able to take advantage of our family share plans. These plans allow family members to share data amongst a number of users or devices. Students may also choose to subscribe to our pre-paid wireless plans. Pre-paid plans offer students, amongst other customers, the ability to manage their wireless costs easily and efficiently.[1]*** End of Document ***

� This information is filed in confidence with the Commission pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act and the directions provided by the Commission in the Appendix to Broadcasting and Telecom Information Bulletin CRTC 2010-961, Procedures for filing confidential information and requesting its disclosure in Commission proceedings, dated 23 December 2010, as amended in Broadcasting and Telecom Information Bulletin CRTC 2010-961-1, dated 26 October 2012.

� These features are offered on Millennium payphones.

� Bell Canada is fully compliant with the Commission's directives to upgrade the availability of TTYs at pay telephones pursuant to Telecom Decision CRTC 2004-47 (Decision 2007-47), Access to pay telephone service as modified by Telecom decision CRTC 2007-12, Bell Aliant Regional Communications, Limited Partnership and Bell Canada – Application to extend certain time frames to equip pay telephones with teletypewriter units, established in Decision 2004-47.

� CRTC 21491 Item 255.4, and CRTC 6716 Item 90.7, for example.
[1] See The Companies(CRTC)7May15-2 for more information about our pre-paid plans.

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2395599 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - 150714-The Companies-CRTC-7May15-7 TNC 2015-134.doc
Bell Canada/Bell Mobility Inc./DMTS/KMTS/
Response to Request
NorthernTel, Limited Partnership/Northwestel Inc./
The Companies(CRTC)7May15-7 TNC 2015-134
Ontera/Télébec, Société en commandite
**** 8 of 11
14 July 2015
Telecommunications Services
Q.
[TSPs]

For each category of telecommunications service (i.e. wireline voice, mobile wireless voice, wireline Internet, mobile wireless Internet, fixed wireless Internet and satellite Internet) provided by your company, identify and describe what service offerings (e.g. discounted plans, special pricing) or initiatives (e.g. bill management tools, toll denial) are available to assist certain segments of the population for which access or affordability may be a concern, such as seniors, low income Canadians, people with disabilities, and students. Describe any other similar offerings or initiatives that are available to other specific segments of the population. Provide for the year 2014, the number and percentage of customers who used these offerings or initiatives.

A. We submit this response on behalf of Bell Aliant Regional Communications, Limited Partnership (which effective 1 July 2015 was wound-up into Bell Canada, and is now operated as a division of Bell Canada), Bell Canada, Bell Mobility Inc., Câblevision du Nord du Québec inc. (CVQ), DMTS, KMTS, NorthernTel, Limited Partnership, Northwestel Inc., Ontera and Télébec, Société en commandite. The response generally applies to all of the listed TSPs except where noted otherwise.

We are submitting certain information contained in the Attachment to this response in confidence.

Specifically, we are submitting usage figures concerning the number of users, and the percentage of our user base that they represent, in confidence. This represents competitively sensitive information about our service offerings that is consistently treated in a confidential manner, and which would not ordinarily be made available to our competitors. The release of this information could cause material harm to our business. We are providing an abridged version of the Attachment for the public record.

We have generally focused this response to describe services and initiatives that are specifically designed to address the needs of customer groups such as those identified in the above question. We have also included a few services that are available to all customers that also address the needs of some or all of the above-named groups.

Beyond the services and initiatives listed below in this response, we also wish to note that our customers are able to leverage our wide range of service offerings to customize their service(s) in a way that best suits their needs, but in a way that cannot be tracked. For example, a customer may choose a particular mobile handset because it offers a volume control that works well with a hearing aid, or it offers a visual indicator for incoming messages that works well for someone with a hearing disability. Given the range of products and services that we offer, and the varying reasons customers may choose them, we cannot provide any insight into why customers may be selecting one service or product over another; however, we do note that the characteristics of our various products appeal to different customers for different reasons, and allow customers to maximize the value of their services.

The services forming the more direct focus of this response are described below and are grouped based on the user segment that we feel the various initiatives most directly serve. Details concerning the specific offerings, the technologies on which they are provided, and the level of usage each offering received in 2014, are shown in the Attachment.

Services primarily used by disabled users

We offer a wide range of telecommunications services for customers with hearing, speech, visual and other physical disabilities. Bell Canada undertakes a variety of activities and consultations with organizations to ensure that it is informed about the challenges faced by persons with disabilities with respect to access to telecommunications products and services, their needs with respect to accessibility and the solutions that can be used to accommodate those needs. Further, we have a pending proposal before the Commission to further enhance our wireless services for customers with disabilities, through specific initiatives to address the following four areas:

a)
The sourcing and packaging of mobile devices and applications to address accessibility needs;
b)
Education and awareness of Bell accessible mobile products and services;
c)
The creation of web tools to support accessible mobile handsets, applications, and accessory selection; and
d)

Improvements to Company operations and client support tools and processes to support Bell's accessibility initiatives and provide lifecycle management of the accessibility program to ensure it is sustainable in the future.

1. Message Relay Service (MRS) and IP Relay Service (IPRS)

MRS and IPRS are tools that make telephone communications accessible for Deaf, hard of hearing and speech-impaired (DHHSI) customers. In a traditional MRS call, a user who has difficulty hearing and/or speaking types written messages to an operator by using a teletypewriter (TTY) machine. The operator facilities the telephone call by voicing the messages typed by the party using the TTY machine, and typing spoken responses back to the TTY user. MRS operators also assist customers in placing Voice Carry Over (VCO) and Hearing Carry Over (HCO) calls. IPRS is similar in nature, but instead of a TTY machine, an Internet-based chat application is used to transmit written messages back and forth between the operator and the called parties. **** MRS and IPRS are available to customers 24 hours a day, seven days a week in **** and ****.

MRS and IPRS both make telecommunications more affordable for relay users. For example, our customers are able to place free local and long distance calls within Canada using IPRS, and are entitled to either free Canadian long distance, or substantive discounts on long distance, when using MRS.

2. Text with 9-1-1 (T9-1-1)

The T9-1-1 service is designed to allow DHHSI users to connect to a 9-1-1 call centre using text messages. T9-1-1 provides 9-1-1 call centres with the ability to converse with a DHHSI person during an emergency, using text messaging. When a DHHSI person requires 9-1-1 services, they dial 9-1-1 on their cell phone. There is no need for them to speak, as the 9-1-1 call taker will receive an indicator that tells them to communicate with the caller via text messaging. The 9-1-1 call taker then initiates text messaging with the caller to address the emergency. A DHHSI person must register for T9-1-1 with their wireless service provider and must have an eligible cell phone before being able to utilize this service. This includes the ability to send and receive text messages.

This service is currently available in certain areas of our territories and is being expanded to new areas on a continual basis as additional Public Safety Answering Points (PSAPs) indicate their readiness to receive such texts. Customers can track the availability of T9-1-1 via the textwith911.ca website, at http://textwith911.ca/service-availability/. This service greatly improves access to emergency services for DHHSI users.

3. In-store interpreters

Upon request, Bell makes available a sign-language interpreter to assist with the in-store experience in our Bell World stores. In order to obtain live interpretation services, a written request must be placed to and approved by ******@***.com. A sign language interpreter will be made available for customers requiring technical assistance with a Bell product (to resolve an issue that can be addressed by store staff) or to assist a customer in obtaining new Bell services. In these situations, in-store interpreters can make our products and services more accessible to persons whose primary mode of communication is sign-language and if they choose to use the service, by facilitating the exchange of information with the aim of ensuring that the customer has a clear understanding of the products and services sought.

4. Dedicated accessibility contact centre

Bell maintains specialized contact centres to assist with accessibility related inquiries. In Atlantic Canada, a specialized group of agents assists consumers with questions related to MRS and IPRS. In Ontario and Quebec, customers with accessibility questions on any of our products and services can reach the Accessibility Services Centre Monday through Friday between the hours of 8:30am and 5:00pm. The Accessibility Services Centre handles inquiries and provides assistance with all initiatives and offerings described in this response.

5. Payphones
Each of the Bell Companies provides payphone service that offers features that enhance accessibility for persons with disabilities.
Specifically,
-
all payphones are hearing-aid compatible;
-
all payphones provide connectability and signal compatibility for customer-provided portable TTYs and VCO devices;
-
many payphones are equipped with TTY capabilities or separate TTY keyboards;
-
all payphones allow connection to MRS (local calls from payphones which use MRS are free of charge, and toll calls are at reduced rates);
-
each Millennium payphone has a volume control button; and
-
some payphones (for example, Millennium desk-top phones) have built-in data jacks which can be connected to a portable computer.
Payphones also allow customers to place local calls of unlimited duration at a defined, regulated rate.
6. Operator assisted calling discounts

Operators will place local calls free of charge, waive the surcharge associated with placing operator-assisted long distance calls, and navigate Interactive Voice Response (IVR) systems for customers with disabilities and seniors who require assistance.

7. Directory assistance fee exemption

Bell's customers with disabilities and seniors are exempt from paying local and long distance Directory Assistance charges from any location.

8. **** phone discount

Bell provides a discount of $1.90/month off the standard service rate for home phone service to registered disabled customers. Télébec offers a discount from its regular ****-Tone rate for disabled customers.

9. Accessible billing formats

We provide consumers with bills in alternate, accessible formats upon request. Alternate formats may include Braille, large print, audio bills, or electronic bills. Registration may be required to receive these services.

10. Website dedicated to accessibility features

Bell Canada maintains a specific website (www.bell.ca/accessibility) that provides easy access to detailed information concerning all accessible products and services, as well as contact information for the Bell Accessibility Services Centre. The other Bell companies generally maintain website pages with information on products and services specifically for users with special needs. These websites are generally maintained to W3C WCAG 2.0 AA Level accessibility standards. Our accessibility services can be easily located by a prominent link on our main website landing pages. Links to our accessibility webpages are as follows:

· http://www.bellaliant.net/home-phone-services/special-needs
· http://www.telebec.com/ (click on link "services d'accessibilité")
· http://northerntel.ca/ntlathome/default_accessibility.htm
· http://dmts.biz/accessibility-services/
· http://kmts.ca/support/accessibility-services/
11. Voice-activated dialling

Voice-activated dialling provides for placing a telephone call by speaking the name of the desired party into the telephone transmitter. This feature is available to individual-line customers with a personal voice directory of user inputted names and associated numbers. Customers can record 100 voice contacts through their phone and store 1,000 contacts in the Web application, and they can store up to five phone numbers per contact. Customers can dial a number that's not in their contact list by saying "Dial" or "Call" and then the phone number. This service can be helpful for people with mobility, cognitive or vision issues.

12. Loud volume ringer and strobe lights

This service assists customers who require an extra loud ringer and/or a strobe light to help them identify incoming telephone calls. These features can be obtained through Bell Aliant.

Services that assist low-income users

In addition to the packages and rate plans described in our responses to The Companies(CRTC)7May15-1 and -2 TNC 2015-134, and our promotional offers and bundled services that are generally available to all customers, we offer a number of specific bill management tools that can assist low-income users in managing the cost of their services. The following services are available to all customers with no criteria for eligibility, but may be of particular interest to customers seeking to limit or reduce the cost of their service.

1. **** management tools (i.e., **** Distance, Directory Assistance, Collect Call, Pay-per-use, 1-900 Restrictions)

We offer a number of options that customers may use with their home phone services to exclude the use of pay-per-use (PPU) features or long distance charges. The option to not access PPU features and/or long distance calling gives customers more certainty and control over their monthly bills and serves as an important bill management tool. The specific options that may be added are as follows:

· **** distance calling restriction: This prevents out-going long distance calls from being placed from the telephone line.

· Collect calling (and 3rd Party Calling) block: This prevents collect calls or 3rd party billed calls from being placed or billed to a telephone line, eliminating unwanted charges.

· Directory assistance: This prevents out-going calls from connecting to the 411 Directory Assistance service, which incurs a fee for use. This also prevents access to Automatic Directory Assistance Call Completion service.

· PPU features block: This prevents the use of PPU features such as:
· Call return (*69)
· Busy call return (*66)
· Call trace (*57)
· Three way calling (*71)
· 1-900 block: This prevents out-going calls to 1-900 services that incur charges.
There is generally no charge to add toll restriction or 900 Call Blocking to the customer's line, or to block access to PPU features.
2. Internet usage notification

On wireless service packages, we send customers messages when they have used 75% of their monthly data usage. Wireline Internet customers are also provided with usage notifications by email where we have an email address on file. This allows customers to manage their usage and avoid any unexpected charges. In Atlantic Canada, for wireline Internet, there are no usage caps.

3. Special payment terms

Customers who are experiencing difficulty paying their bills may contact us to discuss ways to reduce their bill by optimizing their account or removing unnecessary products and services. For those in arrears, we arrange special repayment schedules to help the customer manage payments. This allows customers to continue to receive services in a manner that accommodates their financial situation.

In order to assist customers who subscribe to single-line service with the up-front costs of installing service, we offer an Installment **** Provision (IPP). The IPP allows customers of single-line service to pay Service Charges in six equal monthly payments.

Services that specifically assist seniors
We offer a number of services that specifically assist seniors:
1. Operator assisted calling discounts

As stated above, operators will place local calls free of charge, waive the surcharge associated with placing operator-assisted long distance calls, and navigate Interactive Voice Response (IVR) systems for customers with disabilities and seniors who require assistance.

2. Directory assistance fee exemption

As stated above, Bell in Ontario, Quebec and Newfoundland and Labrador provides seniors with an exemption from paying local and long distance Directory Assistance charges from any location.

3. Special jacks for medical alarm and response systems

A special 8-pin jack is required in order for medical alarm, life line services to be installed for a customer, such as those available through the Canadian Red **** and Direct Alert. We will install the special jack for the customer upon request, for the same charge as a regular jack, helping facilitate the provision of these services.

Services that specifically assist students

We offer a number of promotions specifically developed to assist students, particularly with respect to Internet services. For example, Bell Canada typically runs a promotion on stand-alone Internet each year during the back to school season. These promotions typically provide subscribers with a discounted service rate for eight months, without a contract period. This allows the promotion to cover the entire school year. These promotions also often include higher bandwidth amounts than typical packages and may waive activation fees. Promotions vary across each province. In Atlantic Canada, Bell Aliant similarly offers promotions for students each fall for stand-alone Internet services. These promotions are also dynamic and change from year to year, but generally involve promotional pricing lasting 12 months in duration without a contract period, and may include the waiving of certain fees, such modem charges, activation fees or stand-alone Internet surcharges.

With respect to mobile services, students are able to take advantage of our family share plans. These plans allow family members to share data amongst a number of users or devices. Students may also choose to subscribe to our pre-paid wireless plans. Pre-paid plans offer students, amongst other customers, the ability to manage their wireless costs easily and efficiently.[1]*** End of Document ***

� This information is filed in confidence with the Commission pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act and the directions provided by the Commission in the Appendix to Broadcasting and Telecom Information Bulletin CRTC 2010-961, Procedures for filing confidential information and requesting its disclosure in Commission proceedings, dated 23 December 2010, as amended in Broadcasting and Telecom Information Bulletin CRTC 2010-961-1, dated 26 October 2012.

� These features are offered on Millennium payphones.

� Bell Canada is fully compliant with the Commission's directives to upgrade the availability of TTYs at pay telephones pursuant to Telecom Decision CRTC 2004-47 (Decision 2007-47), Access to pay telephone service as modified by Telecom decision CRTC 2007-12, Bell Aliant Regional Communications, Limited Partnership and Bell Canada – Application to extend certain time frames to equip pay telephones with teletypewriter units, established in Decision 2004-47.

� CRTC 21491 Item 255.4, and CRTC 6716 Item 90.7, for example.
[1] See The Companies(CRTC)7May15-2 for more information about our pre-paid plans.

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2395599 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - 150714-The Companies-CRTC-7May15-7 TNC 2015-134.doc
Bell Canada/Bell Mobility Inc./DMTS/KMTS/
Response to Request
NorthernTel, Limited Partnership/Northwestel Inc./
The Companies(CRTC)7May15-7 TNC 2015-134
Ontera/Télébec, Société en commandite
**** 8 of 11
14 July 2015
Telecommunications Services
Q.
[TSPs]

For each category of telecommunications service (i.e. wireline voice, mobile wireless voice, wireline Internet, mobile wireless Internet, fixed wireless Internet and satellite Internet) provided by your company, identify and describe what service offerings (e.g. discounted plans, special pricing) or initiatives (e.g. bill management tools, toll denial) are available to assist certain segments of the population for which access or affordability may be a concern, such as seniors, low income Canadians, people with disabilities, and students. Describe any other similar offerings or initiatives that are available to other specific segments of the population. Provide for the year 2014, the number and percentage of customers who used these offerings or initiatives.

A. We submit this response on behalf of Bell Aliant Regional Communications, Limited Partnership (which effective 1 July 2015 was wound-up into Bell Canada, and is now operated as a division of Bell Canada), Bell Canada, Bell Mobility Inc., Câblevision du Nord du Québec inc. (CVQ), DMTS, KMTS, NorthernTel, Limited Partnership, Northwestel Inc., Ontera and Télébec, Société en commandite. The response generally applies to all of the listed TSPs except where noted otherwise.

We are submitting certain information contained in the Attachment to this response in confidence.

Specifically, we are submitting usage figures concerning the number of users, and the percentage of our user base that they represent, in confidence. This represents competitively sensitive information about our service offerings that is consistently treated in a confidential manner, and which would not ordinarily be made available to our competitors. The release of this information could cause material harm to our business. We are providing an abridged version of the Attachment for the public record.

We have generally focused this response to describe services and initiatives that are specifically designed to address the needs of customer groups such as those identified in the above question. We have also included a few services that are available to all customers that also address the needs of some or all of the above-named groups.

Beyond the services and initiatives listed below in this response, we also wish to note that our customers are able to leverage our wide range of service offerings to customize their service(s) in a way that best suits their needs, but in a way that cannot be tracked. For example, a customer may choose a particular mobile handset because it offers a volume control that works well with a hearing aid, or it offers a visual indicator for incoming messages that works well for someone with a hearing disability. Given the range of products and services that we offer, and the varying reasons customers may choose them, we cannot provide any insight into why customers may be selecting one service or product over another; however, we do note that the characteristics of our various products appeal to different customers for different reasons, and allow customers to maximize the value of their services.

The services forming the more direct focus of this response are described below and are grouped based on the user segment that we feel the various initiatives most directly serve. Details concerning the specific offerings, the technologies on which they are provided, and the level of usage each offering received in 2014, are shown in the Attachment.

Services primarily used by disabled users

We offer a wide range of telecommunications services for customers with hearing, speech, visual and other physical disabilities. Bell Canada undertakes a variety of activities and consultations with organizations to ensure that it is informed about the challenges faced by persons with disabilities with respect to access to telecommunications products and services, their needs with respect to accessibility and the solutions that can be used to accommodate those needs. Further, we have a pending proposal before the Commission to further enhance our wireless services for customers with disabilities, through specific initiatives to address the following four areas:

a)
The sourcing and packaging of mobile devices and applications to address accessibility needs;
b)
Education and awareness of Bell accessible mobile products and services;
c)
The creation of web tools to support accessible mobile handsets, applications, and accessory selection; and
d)

Improvements to Company operations and client support tools and processes to support Bell's accessibility initiatives and provide lifecycle management of the accessibility program to ensure it is sustainable in the future.

1. Message Relay Service (MRS) and IP Relay Service (IPRS)

MRS and IPRS are tools that make telephone communications accessible for Deaf, hard of hearing and speech-impaired (DHHSI) customers. In a traditional MRS call, a user who has difficulty hearing and/or speaking types written messages to an operator by using a teletypewriter (TTY) machine. The operator facilities the telephone call by voicing the messages typed by the party using the TTY machine, and typing spoken responses back to the TTY user. MRS operators also assist customers in placing Voice Carry Over (VCO) and Hearing Carry Over (HCO) calls. IPRS is similar in nature, but instead of a TTY machine, an Internet-based chat application is used to transmit written messages back and forth between the operator and the called parties. **** MRS and IPRS are available to customers 24 hours a day, seven days a week in **** and ****.

MRS and IPRS both make telecommunications more affordable for relay users. For example, our customers are able to place free local and long distance calls within Canada using IPRS, and are entitled to either free Canadian long distance, or substantive discounts on long distance, when using MRS.

2. Text with 9-1-1 (T9-1-1)

The T9-1-1 service is designed to allow DHHSI users to connect to a 9-1-1 call centre using text messages. T9-1-1 provides 9-1-1 call centres with the ability to converse with a DHHSI person during an emergency, using text messaging. When a DHHSI person requires 9-1-1 services, they dial 9-1-1 on their cell phone. There is no need for them to speak, as the 9-1-1 call taker will receive an indicator that tells them to communicate with the caller via text messaging. The 9-1-1 call taker then initiates text messaging with the caller to address the emergency. A DHHSI person must register for T9-1-1 with their wireless service provider and must have an eligible cell phone before being able to utilize this service. This includes the ability to send and receive text messages.

This service is currently available in certain areas of our territories and is being expanded to new areas on a continual basis as additional Public Safety Answering Points (PSAPs) indicate their readiness to receive such texts. Customers can track the availability of T9-1-1 via the textwith911.ca website, at http://textwith911.ca/service-availability/. This service greatly improves access to emergency services for DHHSI users.

3. In-store interpreters

Upon request, Bell makes available a sign-language interpreter to assist with the in-store experience in our Bell World stores. In order to obtain live interpretation services, a written request must be placed to and approved by ******@***.com. A sign language interpreter will be made available for customers requiring technical assistance with a Bell product (to resolve an issue that can be addressed by store staff) or to assist a customer in obtaining new Bell services. In these situations, in-store interpreters can make our products and services more accessible to persons whose primary mode of communication is sign-language and if they choose to use the service, by facilitating the exchange of information with the aim of ensuring that the customer has a clear understanding of the products and services sought.

4. Dedicated accessibility contact centre

Bell maintains specialized contact centres to assist with accessibility related inquiries. In Atlantic Canada, a specialized group of agents assists consumers with questions related to MRS and IPRS. In Ontario and Quebec, customers with accessibility questions on any of our products and services can reach the Accessibility Services Centre Monday through Friday between the hours of 8:30am and 5:00pm. The Accessibility Services Centre handles inquiries and provides assistance with all initiatives and offerings described in this response.

5. Payphones
Each of the Bell Companies provides payphone service that offers features that enhance accessibility for persons with disabilities.
Specifically,
-
all payphones are hearing-aid compatible;
-
all payphones provide connectability and signal compatibility for customer-provided portable TTYs and VCO devices;
-
many payphones are equipped with TTY capabilities or separate TTY keyboards;
-
all payphones allow connection to MRS (local calls from payphones which use MRS are free of charge, and toll calls are at reduced rates);
-
each Millennium payphone has a volume control button; and
-
some payphones (for example, Millennium desk-top phones) have built-in data jacks which can be connected to a portable computer.
Payphones also allow customers to place local calls of unlimited duration at a defined, regulated rate.
6. Operator assisted calling discounts

Operators will place local calls free of charge, waive the surcharge associated with placing operator-assisted long distance calls, and navigate Interactive Voice Response (IVR) systems for customers with disabilities and seniors who require assistance.

7. Directory assistance fee exemption

Bell's customers with disabilities and seniors are exempt from paying local and long distance Directory Assistance charges from any location.

8. **** phone discount

Bell provides a discount of $1.90/month off the standard service rate for home phone service to registered disabled customers. Télébec offers a discount from its regular ****-Tone rate for disabled customers.

9. Accessible billing formats

We provide consumers with bills in alternate, accessible formats upon request. Alternate formats may include Braille, large print, audio bills, or electronic bills. Registration may be required to receive these services.

10. Website dedicated to accessibility features

Bell Canada maintains a specific website (www.bell.ca/accessibility) that provides easy access to detailed information concerning all accessible products and services, as well as contact information for the Bell Accessibility Services Centre. The other Bell companies generally maintain website pages with information on products and services specifically for users with special needs. These websites are generally maintained to W3C WCAG 2.0 AA Level accessibility standards. Our accessibility services can be easily located by a prominent link on our main website landing pages. Links to our accessibility webpages are as follows:

· http://www.bellaliant.net/home-phone-services/special-needs
· http://www.telebec.com/ (click on link "services d'accessibilité")
· http://northerntel.ca/ntlathome/default_accessibility.htm
· http://dmts.biz/accessibility-services/
· http://kmts.ca/support/accessibility-services/
11. Voice-activated dialling

Voice-activated dialling provides for placing a telephone call by speaking the name of the desired party into the telephone transmitter. This feature is available to individual-line customers with a personal voice directory of user inputted names and associated numbers. Customers can record 100 voice contacts through their phone and store 1,000 contacts in the Web application, and they can store up to five phone numbers per contact. Customers can dial a number that's not in their contact list by saying "Dial" or "Call" and then the phone number. This service can be helpful for people with mobility, cognitive or vision issues.

12. Loud volume ringer and strobe lights

This service assists customers who require an extra loud ringer and/or a strobe light to help them identify incoming telephone calls. These features can be obtained through Bell Aliant.

Services that assist low-income users

In addition to the packages and rate plans described in our responses to The Companies(CRTC)7May15-1 and -2 TNC 2015-134, and our promotional offers and bundled services that are generally available to all customers, we offer a number of specific bill management tools that can assist low-income users in managing the cost of their services. The following services are available to all customers with no criteria for eligibility, but may be of particular interest to customers seeking to limit or reduce the cost of their service.

1. **** management tools (i.e., **** Distance, Directory Assistance, Collect Call, Pay-per-use, 1-900 Restrictions)

We offer a number of options that customers may use with their home phone services to exclude the use of pay-per-use (PPU) features or long distance charges. The option to not access PPU features and/or long distance calling gives customers more certainty and control over their monthly bills and serves as an important bill management tool. The specific options that may be added are as follows:

· **** distance calling restriction: This prevents out-going long distance calls from being placed from the telephone line.

· Collect calling (and 3rd Party Calling) block: This prevents collect calls or 3rd party billed calls from being placed or billed to a telephone line, eliminating unwanted charges.

· Directory assistance: This prevents out-going calls from connecting to the 411 Directory Assistance service, which incurs a fee for use. This also prevents access to Automatic Directory Assistance Call Completion service.

· PPU features block: This prevents the use of PPU features such as:
· Call return (*69)
· Busy call return (*66)
· Call trace (*57)
· Three way calling (*71)
· 1-900 block: This prevents out-going calls to 1-900 services that incur charges.
There is generally no charge to add toll restriction or 900 Call Blocking to the customer's line, or to block access to PPU features.
2. Internet usage notification

On wireless service packages, we send customers messages when they have used 75% of their monthly data usage. Wireline Internet customers are also provided with usage notifications by email where we have an email address on file. This allows customers to manage their usage and avoid any unexpected charges. In Atlantic Canada, for wireline Internet, there are no usage caps.

3. Special payment terms

Customers who are experiencing difficulty paying their bills may contact us to discuss ways to reduce their bill by optimizing their account or removing unnecessary products and services. For those in arrears, we arrange special repayment schedules to help the customer manage payments. This allows customers to continue to receive services in a manner that accommodates their financial situation.

In order to assist customers who subscribe to single-line service with the up-front costs of installing service, we offer an Installment **** Provision (IPP). The IPP allows customers of single-line service to pay Service Charges in six equal monthly payments.

Services that specifically assist seniors
We offer a number of services that specifically assist seniors:
1. Operator assisted calling discounts

As stated above, operators will place local calls free of charge, waive the surcharge associated with placing operator-assisted long distance calls, and navigate Interactive Voice Response (IVR) systems for customers with disabilities and seniors who require assistance.

2. Directory assistance fee exemption

As stated above, Bell in Ontario, Quebec and Newfoundland and Labrador provides seniors with an exemption from paying local and long distance Directory Assistance charges from any location.

3. Special jacks for medical alarm and response systems

A special 8-pin jack is required in order for medical alarm, life line services to be installed for a customer, such as those available through the Canadian Red **** and Direct Alert. We will install the special jack for the customer upon request, for the same charge as a regular jack, helping facilitate the provision of these services.

Services that specifically assist students

We offer a number of promotions specifically developed to assist students, particularly with respect to Internet services. For example, Bell Canada typically runs a promotion on stand-alone Internet each year during the back to school season. These promotions typically provide subscribers with a discounted service rate for eight months, without a contract period. This allows the promotion to cover the entire school year. These promotions also often include higher bandwidth amounts than typical packages and may waive activation fees. Promotions vary across each province. In Atlantic Canada, Bell Aliant similarly offers promotions for students each fall for stand-alone Internet services. These promotions are also dynamic and change from year to year, but generally involve promotional pricing lasting 12 months in duration without a contract period, and may include the waiving of certain fees, such modem charges, activation fees or stand-alone Internet surcharges.

With respect to mobile services, students are able to take advantage of our family share plans. These plans allow family members to share data amongst a number of users or devices. Students may also choose to subscribe to our pre-paid wireless plans. Pre-paid plans offer students, amongst other customers, the ability to manage their wireless costs easily and efficiently.[1]*** End of Document ***

� This information is filed in confidence with the Commission pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act and the directions provided by the Commission in the Appendix to Broadcasting and Telecom Information Bulletin CRTC 2010-961, Procedures for filing confidential information and requesting its disclosure in Commission proceedings, dated 23 December 2010, as amended in Broadcasting and Telecom Information Bulletin CRTC 2010-961-1, dated 26 October 2012.

� These features are offered on Millennium payphones.

� Bell Canada is fully compliant with the Commission's directives to upgrade the availability of TTYs at pay telephones pursuant to Telecom Decision CRTC 2004-47 (Decision 2007-47), Access to pay telephone service as modified by Telecom decision CRTC 2007-12, Bell Aliant Regional Communications, Limited Partnership and Bell Canada – Application to extend certain time frames to equip pay telephones with teletypewriter units, established in Decision 2004-47.

� CRTC 21491 Item 255.4, and CRTC 6716 Item 90.7, for example.
[1] See The Companies(CRTC)7May15-2 for more information about our pre-paid plans.

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2395735 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - (PDF) 150714_SaskTel_Responses_RFIs_NC15-134_ABR.pdf
**** Hersche
Senior Director -
Regulatory Affairs
2121 Saskatchewan Drive
****, Saskatchewan
*** ***
Telephone: (306) 777-5346

Fax: (306) 565-6216 Electronic Fax: (306) 791-1457 Internet: ******@***.com

14 July 2015
via GCKey and e-mail
File No. 8663-C12-201503186
Mr. John Traversy
Secretary General
Canadian Radio-television and
Telecommunications Commission
Ottawa, ON *** ***
**** Mr. Traversy:

Re: Telecom Notice of Consultation CRTC 2015-134, Review of basic telecommunications services – Responses to Requests for Information 1. Pursuant to paragraph 44 of Telecom Notice of Consultation CRTC 2015-134, Review of basic telecommunications services, as amended by staff letter of 28 May, Saskatchewan Telecommunications (SaskTel) submits its responses to Requests for Information in the above noted proceeding.

2. Portions of the information provided in response to the interrogatories is provided in confidence in accordance with section 39 of the Telecommunications Act, section 32 of the Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission Rules of Practice and Procedure (CRTC Rules), Broadcasting and Telecom Information Bulletin CRTC 2010-961, and section 20 of the Access to Information Act.

3. This confidential information is commercially sensitive and is treated consistently in a confidential manner by SaskTel. Disclosure of the information provided could reasonably be expected to result in material financial loss and prejudice to the competitive position of SaskTel.

4. SaskTel submits portions of the following interrogatory responses in confidence with the Commission for the reason stated within the response.

SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-3 NC 2015-134
SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-4 NC 2015-134
SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-6 NC 2015-134
SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-7 NC 2015-134
SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-8 NC 2015-134
Mr. John Traversy
14 July 2015
**** 2 of 4
SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-9 NC 2015-134
SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-10 NC 2015-134
SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-11 NC 2015-134
Sincerely,
**** McKay
for **** Hersche
Senior Director - Regulatory Affairs
AM/nb
Attachments
cc: John Macri, CRTC, ******@***.com
**** Bailey, CRTC, ****.******@***.com

Distribution list as per CRTC letter of 28 May 2015 Mr. John Traversy

14 July 2015
**** 3 of 4
Distribution ****

******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com,

******@***.com, ******@***.com,

******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ****.******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com,

******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com,

******@***.com, ******@***.com,

******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ****.******@***.com, ******@***.com,

******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com,

******@***.com, ******@***.com,

******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ****@harewaves.net, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ****.******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ****.******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com , ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ****.******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, Mr. John Traversy

14 July 2015
**** 4 of 4

******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com,

******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ****.******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, broller-******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com,

******@***.com, ******@***.com,

******@***.com, ******@***.com, helene.pellerin@saint-lambert.ca, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com

***End of Document***
SASKTEL RESPONSE TO INTERROGATORY

14 JULY 2015 SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-1 NC 2015-134 PAGE 1 OF 4

INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. IDENTIFY THE NUMBER AND CORRESPONDING PERCENTAGE OF RESIDENTIAL CUSTOMERS SUBSCRIBING TO THE SERVICES LISTED BELOW AS OF DECEMBER 2014 BY EACH PROVINCE/TERRITORY WHERE THE COMPANY PROVIDES SERVICE:

A) THE LOWEST PRICED WIRELINE VOICE SERVICE; AND B) THE LOWEST PRICED POSTPAID MOBILE WIRELESS VOICE PLAN.

FOR EACH SERVICE, SPECIFY THE PERCENTAGE OF CUSTOMERS LOCATED IN I) HIGH COST SERVING AREAS (HCSAS) AND II) NON-HCSAS. PROVIDE A DESCRIPTION OF EACH SERVICE OFFERING (E.G. OPTIONAL SERVICES OR ENHANCED FEATURES; NUMBER OF LOCAL MINUTES FOR DAYTIME, EVENINGS, AND WEEKENDS; LONG DISTANCE MINUTES; NUMBER OF TEXT MESSAGES INCLUDED). SPECIFY 1) THE NON-DISCOUNTED PRICE FOR EACH SERVICE, 2) WHETHER THE PRICE IS AVAILABLE THROUGHOUT THE PROVINCE/TERRITORY PROVIDING THE REASONS FOR ANY DIFFERENCES, AND 3) ANY ADDITIONAL MONTHLY CHARGES THAT MAY APPLY.

A. a) In terms of residential wireline voice services, SaskTel provides service in its forborne and non-forborne exchanges in accordance with its General Tariff – Basic Services CRTC 21411 Item 110.12 – Network Access Service. The service includes individual local ****-Tone service with unlimited local calling within the customers’ exchange; access to low-speed internet at local rates;

access to the long distance network of the customers’ choice and to operator/directory services; and access to enhanced calling features, emergency services, message relay services and privacy and protection features. Also included is a listing in the local telephone book and one copy of the local telephone book per year.

The rate paid for wireline voice service varies based on the customer location within a rate band, as well as whether they are located inside or outside a base rate area.

SaskTel’s rate band structure is defined in General Tariff – Basic Services CRTC 21411 Item 100.12 – Rate Band Structure, and is provided below:

SASKTEL RESPONSE TO INTERROGATORY

14 JULY 2015 SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-1 NC 2015-134 PAGE 2 OF 4

INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Band Description Classification

A Downtown core areas of **** and
Saskatoon.
Non-HCSA

B Remaining areas of the **** and Saskatoon exchanges.

Non-HCSA

C Exchange areas of Estevan, Moose Jaw, **** Battleford, Prince ****, **** Current, Yorkton, and Weyburn.

Non-HCSA
D Not Applicable to SaskTel. N/A

E Wire Centres with less than 1500 total Network Access Service (NAS).

HCSA

F Wire Centres with greater than 1500 total lines and less than 8000 total lines and where the average loop length is greater than 4

kilometres.
HCSA

G Wire Centres located north of the agricultural area of Saskatchewan as defined in SaskTel’s General Tariff-Basic Services on Extra

Provisioning Charges.
HCSA

Base Rate Areas are defined in General Tariff – Basic Services CRTC 21411 Item 82 as follows:

Base Rate Area - The specific section or part of an Exchange Area within which Local Access Services are furnished at basic monthly rates and contains the designated Rate Centre for toll and other Interexchange Services. The Base Rate Area has a serving central office.

Island Base Rate (IBRA) - An area within an Exchange Area, remote from the Base Rate Area, within which Local Access Services are furnished. It is billed at a basic monthly rate that is dependent upon Rate Band criteria; however, it is not the designated Rate Centre and does not necessarily have a serving central office. An Island Base Rate has a stable population of 50 or more permanent SASKTEL RESPONSE TO INTERROGATORY

14 JULY 2015 SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-1 NC 2015-134 PAGE 3 OF 4

INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION households or businesses with telephone service in close proximity with each other.

Please refer to the following table for information regarding the price paid for local voice service by rate band.

SaskTel notes that 46% of its residential wireline customers subscribe to service in HCSAs, while the remaining 54% are in non-HCSAs.

b) SaskTel’s lowest priced postpaid wireless voice plan is the Talk 25 plan at $25.00/month. The plan includes 100 daytime local minutes and unlimited local evening and weekend calling. The rate for additional daytime minutes is $0.30/minute, and long distance minutes are rated at $0.45/min for calls placed within Canada to Canada & the United States, and $1.50/min for calls placed Rate Band BRA/IBRA type ****/month

($)
A N/A 21.54
B Inside 21.54
B Outside 24.87
C Inside 22.00
C Outside 25.83
C Inside – former Rotary Dial
customers in ****
Battleford
19.50
C Outside – former Rotary Dial
customers in ****
Battleford
23.33
E Inside/Outside 30.64
F Inside/Outside 30.64
G Inside/Outside 30.64
SASKTEL RESPONSE TO INTERROGATORY

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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION from the United States to Canada or the United States. The plan also includes Three-Way Calling, Call Transfer, Call Waiting and pay-per-use Text ($0.20/sent message) and Picture messaging ($0.75/sent message).

In terms of customer distribution for wireless customers, as the customers are mobile SaskTel is unable to determine with any high degree of certainty where the customer is located. However, based on telephone number assigned to the device, SaskTel notes that 49% of its wireless customers would be considered to subscribe to service in HCSAs, while the remaining 51% are in non-HCSAs.

***End of Document***
SASKTEL RESPONSE TO INTERROGATORY

14 JULY 2015 SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-2 NC 2015-134 PAGE 1 OF 1

INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. IDENTIFY THE LOWEST PRICED PREPAID WIRELESS VOICE PLAN OFFERED AS OF DECEMBER 2014 BY EACH PROVINCE/TERRITORY WHERE THE COMPANY PROVIDES SERVICE. PROVIDE A DESCRIPTION OF THE SERVICE OFFERING, AS WELL AS ANY ASSOCIATED CONDITIONS (E.G. PER CALL CONNECTION, ROLL OVER MINUTES, OTHER ASSOCIATED CHARGES). INDICATE THE PRICE PER MINUTE OF A LOCAL CALL. SPECIFY WHETHER 1) THE PLAN IS OFFERED THROUGHOUT THE PROVINCE/TERRITORY, AND 2) THERE ARE DIFFERENCES IN PRICING FOR THAT PLAN ACROSS THE PROVINCE/TERRITORY PROVIDING THE REASONS FOR ANY DIFFERENCES.

A. The lowest priced prepaid wireless voice plan that SaskTel offers is its Prepaid Pay Per Use plan. This plan has a minimum $8.00/month charge and includes $0.10/minute local calling, $0.25/minute long distance calling, and $0.20 per SMS sent charges. Also included in the service are Mini Mail voice mail, call waiting, call transfer and three-way calling. As per all SaskTel wireless plans, the service is available at the same price across the entire province where SaskTel has wireless service available.

***End of Document***
FILED IN CONFIDENCE WITH THE CRTC
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PAGE 1 OF 2
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. IDENTIFY, FOR EACH PROVINCE/TERRITORY WHERE THE COMPANY PROVIDES SERVICE, THE NUMBER AND CORRESPONDING PERCENTAGE OF YOUR RESIDENTIAL CUSTOMERS AS OF DECEMBER 2014 WHO WERE SUBSCRIBING TO A BROADBAND INTERNET PLAN CLOSEST TO THE COMMISSION’S TARGET SPEEDS OF 5 MEGABITS PER SECOND (MBPS) DOWNLOAD AND 1 MBPS UPLOAD.

SPECIFY THE PERCENTAGE OF THESE CUSTOMERS LOCATED IN I) HCSAS AND II) NON-HCSAS. PROVIDE A DESCRIPTION OF THE BROADBAND INTERNET PLAN (E.G. SPEEDS, DATA CAPS, OVERAGE CHARGES). SPECIFY 1) THE NON-DISCOUNTED PRICE FOR THE SERVICE, AND 2) WHETHER THE PRICE IS AVAILABLE THROUGHOUT THE PROVINCE/TERRITORY PROVIDING THE REASONS FOR ANY DIFFERENCES.

A. SaskTel is filing portions of this response in confidence with the Commission in accordance with section 39 of the Telecommunications Act, section 32 of the Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission Rules of Practice and Procedure (CRTC Rules), Broadcasting and Telecom Information Bulletin CRTC 2010-961, and section 20 of the Access to Information Act. Detailed demand information is treated consistently in a confidential manner by SaskTel. Release of this information on the public record would provide current and potential competitors with detailed knowledge of the types of broadband access demanded by SaskTel’s customers. This information would not normally be available to them and that would allow them to compete more effectively with SaskTel and that would prejudice the competitive position of the company, resulting in direct and material financial loss.

SaskTel had a total of # or 67% of its residential broadband subscribers subscribed to one of its broadband internet plans which were closest to the Commission’s target speed of 5 Mbps download and 1 Mbps upload. Of these customers, 58% were located in non-HCSAs, while the remaining 42% were located in HCSAs.

# Filed in confidence with the CRTC
#
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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Please refer to the following table regarding the broadband internet plans offered to customers which are closest to the Commission’s target speeds.

Service High ****
Plus
High ****
Basic
High ****
Fusion
HTS Satellite Internet
Availability 23 large
communities
288 smaller
communities
59 rural
towers
Within specific areas of
province within HTS
coverage area

Monthly Fee $49.95 $49.95 $79.95 $64.99 to $84.99 Upstream

(up to)
640 Kbps 640 Kbps 1 Mbps 1 Mbps
Downstream
(up to)
5 Mbps 5 Mbps 5 Mbps 5 Mbps
Monthly
Bandwidth

Unlimited Unlimited 50 GB 20 GB ($64.99) 30 GB ($74.95)

40 GB ($84.99)
Overage
Charges

N/A N/A N/A (Note 1) 20 GB – Soft cap (Note 2) 30 GB – Soft cap (Note 2)

40 GB - $5/GB

Note 1: Once a customer has reached the 50 GB monthly bandwidth cap, the customer’s speeds are reduced to 2 Mbps download and 256 Kbps upload for the remainder of their billing period, at which time full speed is restored.

Note 2: Once a customer has reached their monthly bandwidth cap, the customer’s speeds are reduced to 300 Kbps download and 100 Kbps upload for the remainder of their billing period, at which time full speed is restored.

SaskTel notes that the differences in rates between the above noted plans are based on the technology utilized to deliver the service. The DSL-based services are priced the same, while the High **** Fusion (based on LTE-TDD technology) and HTS Satellite Internet (based on HTS satellite technology) services are priced higher due to the additional cost incurred by the company to provision these services over their respective technologies.

***End of Document***
FILED IN CONFIDENCE WITH THE CRTC
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PAGE 1 OF 3
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. IDENTIFY THE FIVE MOST POPULAR FEATURES (E.G. VOICEMAIL, CALL DISPLAY, EXTRA USAGE PLAN, EMAIL ACCOUNT) CHOSEN BY YOUR RESIDENTIAL CUSTOMERS FOR MOBILE WIRELESS SERVICES. PROVIDE A DESCRIPTION OF THOSE FEATURES (INCLUDING THE NON-DISCOUNTED PRICE) AND THE CORRESPONDING NUMBER AND PERCENTAGE OF CUSTOMERS SUBSCRIBING TO THEM. IN ADDITION, SPECIFY THE NUMBER AND PERCENTAGE OF THESE CUSTOMERS LOCATED IN I) HCSAS AND II) NON-HCSAS FOR EACH PROVINCE/TERRITORY WHERE THE COMPANY PROVIDES MOBILE WIRELESS SERVICE.

A. Pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act, SaskTel is filing demand related information in confidence with the Commission. The information in question is detailed information that is confidential and is treated consistently in a confidential manner by SaskTel. Release of this information on the public record would provide current and potential competitors with detailed knowledge of the use of SaskTel’s network by various carriers. This information would not normally be available to them and that would allow them to compete more effectively with SaskTel and that would prejudice the competitive position of the company, resulting in direct and material financial loss. An abridged version has been provided.

The five most popular features for mobile wireless services are as follows:

1) Text Messaging (SMS) – unlimited SMS ($13.00/month stand-alone) This feature includes unlimited sent text messages. SaskTel does not charge for incoming text messaging. Unlimited SMS can be purchased as a stand-alone subscription to any voice plan, or is included in many SaskTel converged rate plans.

2) Call Display – incoming/outgoing call display ($8.00/month stand-alone for incoming, outgoing free)

Call display has two distinct parts:
FILED IN CONFIDENCE WITH THE CRTC
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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION i. Incoming Call Display – shows the number of an incoming cellular or landline call to a cellular phone.

ii. Outgoing Call Display – sends a cellular number to be displayed on other cellular or landline phones.

Customers can have incoming display, outgoing display or both. Call Display can be purchased as a stand-alone subscription to any voice plan, or is included in many SaskTel converged rate plans.

3) Unlimited Canada **** Distance add-on ($10.00/month) This feature provides unlimited calls from anywhere within Canada to anywhere in Canada or the U.S. (includes local and long distance airtime). It can be purchased as a stand-alone subscription.

4) Picture Messaging (MMS) ($0.75 per sent MMS) Picture/Video Messaging allows SaskTel customers – provided their wireless device is capable – to send and receive MMS (multimedia) messages (picture/video messages) with each other, as well as send and receive MMS (picture/video messages) with customers subscribed to other carriers.

Customers are charged per sent MMS unless they subscribe to a Wireless Data Service plan or Converged Wireless Rate Plan.

5) Voice Mail (Basic: $5.00/month, Enhanced: $10.00/month, Mini Mail:

$3.00/month)

The Voice Messaging Service answers calls when customers are away from their phone, already on their phone, too busy to answer their phone, or when their phone is turned off.

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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Customers can retrieve messages from wherever they are, 24 hours a day, using a cellular or landline phone. Alternatively, customers can access their voice mailbox online from SaskTel.com for free.

Basic and Enhanced voice mail services allow for 25 messages to be stored, have a message duration of 3 minutes and archives messages for 14 days. Mini Mail voice mail service allows for 5 messages to be stored, have a message duration of 2 minutes and archives messages for 7 days.

Please refer to the following table for demand values for these services.

Service Number of
subscribers
non-HCSA
Number of
subscribers
HCSA
Total
Number of
subscribers
Percentage
of
subscribers
Text Messaging (SMS) # # # 64.4%
Call Display # # # 70.2%
Canada Unlimited LD # # # 11.7%
Picture Messaging
(MMS)
# # # 51.4%
Voice Mail # # # 36.7%
# Filed in confidence with the CRTC
***End of Document***
SASKTEL RESPONSE TO INTERROGATORY

14 JULY 2015 SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-5 NC 2015-134 PAGE 1 OF 2

INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. IDENTIFY THE NUMBER AND CORRESPONDING PERCENTAGE OF RESIDENTIAL CUSTOMERS SUBSCRIBING TO THE SERVICES LISTED BELOW AS OF DECEMBER 2014 FOR EACH PROVINCE/TERRITORY WHERE THE COMPANY PROVIDES SERVICE:

A) THE THREE MOST POPULAR WIRELINE VOICE PLANS; AND B) THE THREE MOST POPULAR WIRELINE INTERNET PLANS.

SPECIFY THE PERCENTAGE OF THESE CUSTOMERS LOCATED IN I) HCSAS AND II) NON-HCSAS. PROVIDE A DESCRIPTION OF EACH SERVICE OFFERING (E.G.

OPTIONAL SERVICES; NUMBER OF LOCAL MINUTES FOR DAYTIME, EVENINGS, AND WEEKENDS; LONG DISTANCE MINUTES; SPEEDS, DATA CAPS, OVERAGE CHARGES). SPECIFY THE NON-DISCOUNTED PRICE FOR THE SERVICE AND ANY ADDITIONAL MONTHLY CHARGES THAT MAY APPLY.

A. a) SaskTel does not provide wireline voice plans, and is therefore unable to provide a response as requested. Rather, customers purchase network access service from SaskTel which includes individual local ****-Tone service with unlimited local calling within the customer’s exchange; access to low-speed internet at local rates; access to the long distance network of the customers’ choice and to operator/directory services; access to enhanced calling features, emergency services, message relay services and privacy and protection features. Also included is a listing in the local telephone book and one copy of the local telephone book per year.

Rates and demand numbers for basic local service are provided in SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-1 NC 2015-134. Customers wishing to add enhanced features or long distance packages to their basic service are able to do so with stand-alone features, a feature package or a long distance plan.

b) Please refer to the following table regarding the three most popular wireline internet plans:

SASKTEL RESPONSE TO INTERROGATORY

14 JULY 2015 SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-5 NC 2015-134 PAGE 2 OF 2

INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Plan Download

****
(Mbps)
Upload
****
(Kbps)
****
($)
% of
customers
in HCSA
(Note 1)
% of
customers in
non-HCSA
(Note 2)
High ****
Basic
1.5 or 5.0* 128 or
640*
49.95 21.3% 0.03%
High ****
Classic
1.5 384 39.95 0.63% 13.36%
High ****
Plus
5.0 640 49.95 8.88% 39.00%

Note 1: For the specific service out of total High **** customers Note 2: For the specific service out of total High **** customers * Customers in eligible communities receive 5.0 Mbps download/640 Kbps upload speeds

All High **** Internet plans listed above receive 10 SaskTel.net email addresses with 1 GB of storage each, 24/7 technical support, Unlimited Usage, and modem.

***End of Document***
FILED IN CONFIDENCE WITH THE CRTC
SASKTEL RESPONSE TO INTERROGATORY

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PAGE 1 OF 2
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. PROVIDE THE MONTHLY AVERAGE USAGE OF DATA [IN GIGABYTES (GB)] FOR RESIDENTIAL CUSTOMERS FOR THE YEAR 2014 FOR I) WIRELINE INTERNET SERVICE, AND II) MOBILE WIRELESS INTERNET SERVICE.

A. Pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act, SaskTel is filing demand related information in confidence with the Commission. The information in question is detailed information that is confidential and is treated consistently in a confidential manner by SaskTel. Release of this information on the public record would provide current and potential competitors with detailed knowledge of the use of SaskTel’s network by various carriers. This information would not normally be available to them and that would allow them to compete more effectively with SaskTel and that would prejudice the competitive position of the company, resulting in direct and material financial loss. An abridged version has been provided.

i) SaskTel does not collect user statistics that would be used to determine the average usage of residential customers for customers that are provisioned over Fibre to the Premise (FTTP) or Digital Subscriber Line (DSL) technology. As such, it is unable to provide a response to the question posed for customers served by those technologies.

It does collect monthly usage per subscriber on its High **** Fusion fixed wireless service, and these totals are provided in the table below. Please note that SaskTel commercially launched its Fusion product in **** of 2014, therefore data is only available from that point forward.

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PAGE 2 OF 2
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Month

Average customer
usage (GB)
Apr #
May #
Jun #
Jul #
Aug #
Sep #
Oct #
Nov #
Dec #

ii) On average, SaskTel wireless users consumed # GB of data each month in 2014. A detailed month by month breakdown for 2014 is not available.

# Filed in confidence with the CRTC
***End of Document***
#
FILED IN CONFIDENCE WITH THE CRTC
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PAGE 1 OF 8
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. FOR EACH CATEGORY OF TELECOMMUNICATIONS SERVICE (I.E. WIRELINE VOICE, MOBILE WIRELESS VOICE, WIRELINE INTERNET, MOBILE WIRELESS INTERNET, FIXED WIRELESS INTERNET AND SATELLITE INTERNET) PROVIDED BY YOUR COMPANY, IDENTIFY AND DESCRIBE WHAT SERVICE OFFERINGS (E.G. DISCOUNTED PLANS, SPECIAL PRICING) OR INITIATIVES (E.G. BILL MANAGEMENT TOOLS, TOLL DENIAL) ARE AVAILABLE TO ASSIST CERTAIN SEGMENTS OF THE POPULATION FOR WHICH ACCESS OR AFFORDABILITY MAY BE A CONCERN, SUCH AS SENIORS, LOW INCOME CANADIANS, PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES, AND STUDENTS. DESCRIBE ANY OTHER SIMILAR OFFERINGS OR INITIATIVES THAT ARE AVAILABLE TO OTHER SPECIFIC SEGMENTS OF THE POPULATION. PROVIDE FOR THE YEAR 2014, THE NUMBER AND PERCENTAGE OF CUSTOMERS WHO USED THESE OFFERINGS OR INITIATIVES.

A. Pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act, SaskTel is filing demand related information in confidence with the Commission. The information in question is detailed information that is confidential and is treated consistently in a confidential manner by SaskTel. Release of this information on the public record would provide current and potential competitors with detailed knowledge of the use of SaskTel’s network by various carriers. This information would not normally be available to them and that would allow them to compete more effectively with SaskTel and that would prejudice the competitive position of the company, resulting in direct and material financial loss. An abridged version has been provided.

SaskTel has a number of service offerings that are available to certain segments of the population for which access or affordability may affect their ability to procure telecommunications products and services.

Wireline Voice Service

Bad Debt Repayment Plan – General Tariff Basic Services 21411 - Item 170.10 The Bad Debt Repayment Plan (BDRPP) is a one-time offering to residential customers that assists them in paying back their outstanding bad debt(s) with SaskTel. Customers under BDRPP will receive access to SaskTel’s basic telephone service but they must FILED IN CONFIDENCE WITH THE CRTC

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PAGE 2 OF 8
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION subscribe to Residential **** Management Tools (total toll restriction) and agree to the repayment schedule and associated conditions under BDRPP. BDRPP will be activated at time of installation.

SaskTel currently has # customers or 0.005% of its residential customers on this plan.

Toll Restrictor - General Tariff Basic Services 21411 - Item 170.15 Toll Restrictor curbs a telephone user’s ability to make long distance calls, access 900/976 service, or access Directory Assistance (DA) and Directory Assistance Call Completion (DACC). Toll Restriction is provided within the software of SaskTel’s switches.

SaskTel currently has # customers or 6.4% of its residential customers on this plan.

Residential **** Management Tools - General Tariff Basic Services 21411 - Item 170.05 Residential **** Management Tools are services which enable residential customers to acquire basic telephone service while restricting access to the long distance (LD) network. The type of toll restriction determines what LD network services can be accessed.

The Installment **** Plan also enables the customer’s service connection charge for network access and terminal equipment to be paid over a period of up to six months.

SaskTel is unable to accurately provide the number of customers on these plans as they are not tracked and would require extensive manual effort to determine the number.

# Filed in confidence with the CRTC
#
#
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PAGE 3 OF 8
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Wireless Voice Services

School Bus Safety Plan

SaskTel offers a cellular plan exclusively for cellular phones in vehicles that transport children to and from school and school-related events.

The plan is $15.00/month and includes 60 minutes of local calling with additional minutes being rates at $0.50/minute.

SaskTel currently has # customers on this plan.

Incoming and Outgoing Call Denial

SaskTel offers Call Denial service to customers wishing to restrict the calling patterns on their cellular devices. With Outgoing Call Denial, customers are only able to receive calls, while Incoming Call Denial only allows customers to place outgoing calls.

SaskTel currently has # customers on this plan.

Toll Denial (CDMA network only)

SaskTel offers Toll Denial service to its CDMA customers that allow them to only place local calls. The customer is still able to receive incoming long distance calls from other customers.

SaskTel currently has # customers on this plan.

Special Needs

SaskTel has undertaken many activities to ensure that persons with disabilities have equal and full access to telecommunications and/or programming products and services.

# Filed in confidence with the CRTC
#
#
#
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PAGE 4 OF 8
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION SaskTel is adhering to the many requirements established by the Commission to reduce obstacles to the delivery and receipt of communication services to disabled people. At times, most often at the request of the Saskatchewan disabled community, SaskTel has adopted specific programs or services that exceed national goals.

Telecommunications

The following is a list of special needs telecommunications services that SaskTel provides to disabled persons in Saskatchewan. SaskTel notes that it does not readily track the number of customers who utilize its special needs services:

- SaskTel provides alternate format phone bill and bill inserts using either Braille large print, or diskettes, depending on the request of the end customer.

- Directory Assistance is provided to registered special needs customers at no charge. SaskTel also provides directory assistance call completion at no charge for these customers.

- Telewriters (TTY) allow for communication by typed messages over telephone lines. A Telewriter unit is provided to Registered Users (deaf or speech impaired) at no charge. A second Telewriter can be requested for a Principal Contact, also provided at no charge.

- Telephone Ring Signaller is available at no charge to Registered TTY User.

- SaskTel Relay Service (SRS) assists TTY and IP Relay users to place and receive telephone calls from other TTY/IP Relay users and non-TTY/IP Relay users 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

- Toll calls made through SaskTel’s Relay Service receive a 50% discount.

- Voice Carry Over (VCO) and Hearing Carry Over (HCO) allow TTY users to speak for themselves and use the TTY to read the response of the other party.

Hearing Carry Over TTY users can listen to the other party and use the TTY to type their message. There are no additional charges for VCO and HCO options and no special equipment is required, just a standard TTY.

- TTY Directory Designation is an option for disabled persons where they can have the code TTY displayed following their listed name in the DirectWest directory to FILED IN CONFIDENCE WITH THE CRTC

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PAGE 5 OF 8
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION allow readers to recognize that the customer listed has a Telewriter. There is no charge for this service.

- Voicemail to Text service converts voice mails into text. The converted messages are then delivered as an email or as a text message to the customers’ cell phone. The service is available as pay-per-use or through various service plans.

- Online Voice Mail service allows customers with vision or mobility disabilities to fully administer their voice mail service via the internet and a personal computer or web-enabled device, rather than using a telephone set. The service allows the customer to listen to and manage their messages, change greetings, and to set up new message notifications to be sent to email or text message, in addition to all other administrative options via a secure website. There is no charge for this service.

- In conjunction with the Canadian Paraplegic Association, SaskTel provides a special cellular rate plan for its members. It includes free network access and 100 free minutes a month, Three-Way Calling, Call Transfer and Call Waiting. All other options and additional minutes are chargeable to the user.

- Artificial Larynx Machines are devices that make speech possible for individuals with speech impairments. SaskTel will provide one Artificial Larynx Machine to customers with a speech disability at no charge.

- Telephone Ring Signaller and ringer amplifiers are available.

- Stand-alone ringers for single-line sets and amplified photo telephones are available.

- **** call is available at no charge. (Approved users) - Big button phones are available.

- Teletrainers (telephone simulators) are provided free of charge to people and organizations that request them. These units include instructional videos, pamphlets, and booklets and are used mainly through schools for Special Education classes and with young children to teach them how to properly use the telephone.

In Saskatchewan, payphones also have a number of features available that provide accessibility to deaf or hearing impaired subscribers:

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PAGE 6 OF 8
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION - All payphones are hearing aid compatible.

- All payphones provide connectability and signal compatibility for customer-provided TTYs and Voice Carry Over (VCO) devices.

- All payphones allow connection to SaskTel Relay Service (local calls from payphones which use SRS are free of charge, and toll calls using SRS are made at reduced rates).

- Each Millennium payphone has a volume control button and some payphones have a built-in data jack which can be connected to a portable computer.

- The majority of Millennium payphones are equipped with a Keypad TTY solution, which allows deaf or hearing impaired customers to use the telephone keypad in a manner similar to cellular text messaging in order to place TTY calls. SaskTel is continuing to install the Keypad TTY solution, with the goal of having all Millennium payphones equipped, as to comply with the directives from the CRTC in Telecom Decision CRTC 2004-47, Access to pay telephone service.

- Where demand exists, payphones are permanently-equipped with TTYs. Such payphones are marked with the universal TTY symbol.

Broadcasting

SaskTel maxTV™ Service offers the following features and services to address the needs of persons with disabilities:

- An Interactive Program Guide is incorporated into the digital set top box. It allows customers to search current and future programming, and to develop customized channel line-ups by using the Favorites menu option. With this option, customers can more easily access programming that is tailored to their needs, such as Closed Captioning programming or Described Video channels.

- Described Video programming provides a narrative description of a television program’s key visual elements so that blind or visually impaired customers understand what is occurring on the screen. SaskTel currently passes through described video programming for local, over-the-air signals and nine specialty programming services, and is in compliance with the Commission’s determinations in regards to Described Video.

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PAGE 7 OF 8
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION - Closed Captioning enables deaf and hearing impaired customers to read what is happening in programming. SaskTel passes through closed captioning provided by programming services and is increasingly offering closed captioning on maxTV™ Video on Demand.

- VoicePrint is a national reading service that provides programming of benefit to blind or visually impaired customers. It provides full-text reading of stories, information, news and features published by a variety of newspapers, magazines and periodicals.

Student Promotions

SaskTel offers a number of specific promotions aimed at the student market. These offers apply to part or full time Saskatchewan post-secondary students with a valid Student ID for the 2015/2016 academic year. SaskTel is unable to provide accurate take rates for these promotions given the constant turnover associated with providing services to the student population.

Internet

Eligible students receive infiNET High **** Mach I (100 Mbps down/20 Mbps up) for $30.00 per month (regular $99.95/month) or High **** Ultra (25 Mbps down/2 Mbps up) for $25.00 per month (regular $79.95/month).

Wireless

Students receive $20.00 per month off select premium cellular plans when they activate a new smartphone on a 2 year contract. These plans are shown below:

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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Ultimate

70
Students get it for
$50/mo.**
Regular $70/mo.
 Unlimited local minutes
 150 Canadian long
distance minutes
 10 GB of Canada-wide
data
 Unlimited text, picture and
video messaging
 Call Display and Mini
Voice Mail
Ultimate 13th
Man
Students get it for
$65/mo.**
Regular $85/mo.
 Unlimited local minutes
 Unlimited long distance
minutes
 13 GB of Canada-wide
data
 Unlimited text, picture and
video messaging
 Call Display and
Enhanced Voice Mail
Ultimate 100
Students get it for
$80/mo.**
Regular $100/mo.
 Unlimited local minutes
 Unlimited long distance
minutes
 Unlimited Canada-wide
data
 Unlimited text, picture and
video messaging
 Call Display and Enhanced
Voice Mail
maxTV™ and Internet:

Students also are eligible to receive a promotion on basic maxTV entertainment services in conjunction with High **** Internet. For students in fibre-served areas they can package basic maxTV and infiNET Mach I for $60.00/month (regular $126.95), while those in DSL-served areas can package maxTV and High **** Plus (10 Mbps down/800 Kbps up) for $50.00/month (regular $76.95).

***End of Document***

http://www.sasktel.com/store/view-plan-by-type/browse/Personal/Wireless/Rate-plans/Voice-and-data-plans/_/N-270whttp://www.sasktel.com/store/view-plan-by-type/browse/Personal/Wireless/Rate-plans/Voice-and-data-plans/_/N-270whttp://www.sasktel.com/store/view-plan-by-type/browse/Personal/Wireless/Rate-plans/Voice-and-data-plans/_/N-270whttp://www.sasktel.com/store/view-plan-by-type/browse/Personal/Wireless/Rate-plans/Voice-and-data-plans/_/N-270whttp://www.sasktel.com/store/view-plan-by-type/browse/Personal/Wireless/Rate-plans/Voice-and-data-plans/_/N-270wFILED IN CONFIDENCE WITH THE CRTC

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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. WITH RESPECT TO YOUR COMPANY’S OPERATING TERRITORY, PROVIDE THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION FOR INTERNET SERVICES (EXCLUDING DIAL-UP) THAT YOU OFFER:

A) THE TOTAL NUMBER OF HOUSEHOLDS THAT YOUR COMPANY IS CAPABLE OF SERVING;

B) THE TOTAL NUMBER OF HOUSEHOLDS SERVED BY YOUR COMPANY;

AND

C) THE TOTAL NUMBER OF HOUSEHOLDS SERVED THAT MEET THE COMMISSION’S BROADBAND INTERNET TARGET SPEEDS OF 5 MBPS DOWNLOAD / 1 MBPS UPLOAD.

A. Pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act, SaskTel is filing demand related information in confidence with the Commission. The information in question is detailed information that is confidential and is treated consistently in a confidential manner by SaskTel. Release of this information on the public record would provide current and potential competitors with detailed knowledge of the use of SaskTel’s network by various carriers. This information would not normally be available to them and that would allow them to compete more effectively with SaskTel and that would prejudice the competitive position of the company, resulting in direct and material financial loss. An abridged version has been provided.

a) SaskTel does not directly track the number of households it is capable of serving.

However, utilizing 2011 census data it assumes it is capable of serving approximately 336,209 households within the province.

b) As of 31 May 2015, SaskTel currently serves # households with internet services excluding dial-up.

# Filed in confidence with the CRTC
#
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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION c) As of 31 May 2015, SaskTel currently serves # customers with an internet service that meets or exceeds the Commission’s broadband internet target speeds of 5 Mbps download/1 Mbps upload. That said, SaskTel notes that it serves an additional # households with broadband internet service at speeds of 5 Mbps download/640 Kbps upload and an additional # households with broadband internet service at speeds of 10 Mbps download/800 Kbps upload. SaskTel notes that these speeds do meet or exceed the Commission's targets with respect to download speeds, which is what SaskTel's customers are concerned with. The customer experience gained with increasing upload speeds from 640 Kbps or 800 Kbps to 1 Mbps would be negligible and come at an uneconomic cost.

# Filed in confidence with the CRTC
***End of Document***
#
#
#
SASKTEL RESPONSE TO INTERROGATORY

14 JULY 2015 SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-9 NC 2015-134 PAGE 1 OF 2

INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. WITH RESPECT TO YOUR COMPANY’S OPERATING TERRITORY, PROVIDE THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION FOR AREAS THAT ARE CURRENTLY UNSERVED OR UNDERSERVED AS OF DECEMBER 2014:

A) THE TECHNOLOGIES USED IN THE ACCESS FACILITIES FOR SERVING SUBSCRIBERS (OR HOUSEHOLDS), SUCH AS FIXED WIRELESS ACCESS (LICENSED OR UNLICENSED), SATELLITE (DIRECT TO HOME), CABLE MODEM, DIGITAL SUBSCRIBER LINE (DSL), FIBRE-OPTICS AND MOBILE WIRELESS;

B) FOR EACH TECHNOLOGY IN (A) ABOVE, THE AVERAGE UPSTREAM AND DOWNSTREAM INTERNET SPEEDS THAT YOU OFFER;

C) THE TECHNOLOGIES USED FOR CONNECTING TO THE POP AND AVERAGE CAPACITIES IN MBPS TO / FROM THE POP); AND D) A MAP SHOWING YOUR OPERATING TERRITORY WITH THE TYPES AND LOCATIONS OF ACCESS FACILITIES IN MAPINFO OR COMPATIBLE FORMAT.

A. In regards to the responses to this question, SaskTel is defining unserved and underserved areas to be those areas where it provides internet service, excluding dial-up, which does not meet the Commission’s target speed of 5 Mbps download and 1 Mbps upload. In unserved areas, SaskTel provides no service.

a) SaskTel provides broadband internet service to unserved and underserved areas utilizing wireline xDSL and licensed fixed wireless LTE-TDD technology operating at 2500 MHz. SaskTel does provide mobile wireless coverage in these areas, however, it does not market these services as a broadband internet service.

b) xDSL technology is provisioned to provide speeds of up to 5 Mbps download/640 Kbps upload as well as 10 Mbps download/800 Kbps upload in these areas. In very minimal areas, the service is provided at 1.5 Mbps download/128 Kbps upload. This is dependent upon the length of the customer’s service drop from the DSLAM unit, the speed profile for the community SaskTel has provisioned, and the package chosen by the customer. Fixed wireless over LTE-TDD is SASKTEL RESPONSE TO INTERROGATORY

14 JULY 2015 SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-9 NC 2015-134 PAGE 2 OF 2

INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION provisioned to provide speeds of up to 5 Mbps download/1 Mbps upload to end customers.

c) The vast majority of POPs in SaskTel’s network are connected to the main SaskTel internet infrastructure utilizing Fibre backhaul. There are a very limited number of POPs that connect via licensed Microwave radio or copper based DS1’s.

d) Please see SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-9 NC 2015-134 ATTACHMENT 1.

***End of Document***
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PAGE 1 OF 2
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. WITH RESPECT TO YOUR COMPANY’S OPERATING TERRITORY, PROVIDE THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION IN AREAS THAT ARE CURRENTLY UNSERVED OR UNDERSERVED AS OF DECEMBER 2014:

A) THE TOTAL NUMBER OF POPS;

B) THE TECHNOLOGIES USED FOR BACKHAUL TO / FROM EACH POP;

C) FOR EACH TECHNOLOGY PROVIDED IN RESPONSE TO B. ABOVE, I) TOTAL AVAILABLE CAPACITY IN MBPS (TO / FROM THE POP), AND II) TOTAL CAPACITY CURRENTLY USED BROKEN DOWN BY PEAK AND NON-PEAK USAGE PERIODS; AND

D) A MAP SHOWING YOUR OPERATING AREA WITH THE TYPES AND LOCATIONS OF POPS IN MAPINFO OR COMPATIBLE FORMAT.

A. Pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act, SaskTel is filing detailed network component location and provisioning related information in confidence with the Commission. The information in question is detailed information that is confidential and is treated consistently in a confidential manner by SaskTel. Release of this information on the public record would provide current and potential competitors with detailed knowledge of the use of SaskTel’s network by various carriers. This information would not normally be available to them and that would allow them to compete more effectively with SaskTel and that would prejudice the competitive position of the company, resulting in direct and material financial loss. An abridged version of the attachment has not been provided as it would be meaningless.

In regards to the responses to this question, SaskTel is defining unserved and underserved areas to be those areas where it provides internet service, excluding dial-up, which does not meet the Commission’s target speed of 5 Mbps download and 1 Mbps upload.

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PAGE 2 OF 2
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION a) SaskTel has a total of # POPs in underserved or unserved areas within the province.

b) The vast majority of POPs in SaskTel’s network are connected to the main SaskTel internet infrastructure utilizing Fibre backhaul. There are a very limited number of POPs that connect via licensed Microwave radio or copper-based DS1’s.

c) SaskTel has sufficient capacity to meet demand at each one of its POPs. The exact amount of capacity available and used would vary for every POP. An aggregated value for either of these measures is not available and would, in any case, be meaningless as the relevant capacity gap is that which exists at each individual POP. An average value would also not illustrate individual areas of concern. In any case, SaskTel does not provision its network in this manner which is why the information is not available. Rather, for the SaskTel IP Core and Regional Ethernet Transport, Subject Matter Experts review weekly reports on all links and cross sections augmenting capacity when reaching the threshold utilization of # and some cases having to augment prior to reaching the threshold trigger due to provisioning time frames.

d) Please see SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-10 NC 2015-134 ATTACHMENT 1.

# Filed in confidence with the CRTC
***End of Document***
#
#
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PAGE 1 OF 5
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. TO BETTER UNDERSTAND HISTORICAL AND PROJECTED NETWORK UTILIZATION AND DEMAND FOR BROADBAND INTERNET ACCESS SERVICES, PROVIDE RESPONSES TO THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS.

A) DESCRIBE THE VARIOUS ENGINEERING ASSUMPTIONS ASSOCIATED WITH NETWORK DEPLOYMENTS/UPGRADES, SUCH AS PERCENTAGE OF ACTIVE USERS (I.E. HOUSEHOLDS) AT PEAK PERIODS AND AT OTHER TIMES OF DAY, AS WELL AS THEIR PEAK USAGE DEMANDS. PROVIDE THE OVERSUBSCRIPTION RATIOS USED.

B) ARE DIFFERENT ENGINEERING ASSUMPTIONS UTILIZED WHEN PLANNING NETWORK DEPLOYMENTS/UPGRADES IN DIFFERENT GEOGRAPHIC AREAS, WHEN DIFFERENT TECHNOLOGIES ARE USED, OR WHERE DIFFERENT SPEED TIERS ARE OFFERED TO END USERS? IF YES, PLEASE EXPLAIN THESE DIFFERENCES.

C) FOR EACH OF THE YEARS 2010 TO 2014, PROVIDE 1) THE NETWORK ENGINEERING ASSUMPTION FOR THROUGHPUT BANDWIDTH ALLOCATED TO EACH END USER EXPRESSED IN KILOBITS PER SECOND (KBPS) (I.E. ENGINEERED THROUGHPUT), AND 2) THE AVERAGE VOLUME OF DATA USED PER END USER EXPRESSED IN GIGABYTES (GB) PER MONTH.

D) FOR EACH OF THE YEARS 2015 TO 2019, PROVIDE THE FORECASTS FOR THE INFORMATION REQUESTED IN PART C) ABOVE.

A. Pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act, SaskTel is filing detailed network demand related information in confidence with the Commission. The information in question is detailed information that is confidential and is treated consistently in a confidential manner by SaskTel. Release of this information on the public record would provide current and potential competitors with detailed knowledge of SaskTel’s network design. This information would not normally be available to them and that would allow them to compete more effectively with SaskTel and that would prejudice the competitive position of the company, resulting in direct and material financial loss. An abridged version is been provided for the public record.

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PAGE 2 OF 5
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION a) For FTTP, the engineering assumption is that the Optical Line Terminal (OLT) is capable of serving up to 2048 customers, provisioned via a fibre drop and with GPON based service within a 15KM to 30KM radius dependent on equipment vintage. Unlike copper based xDSL or fixed wireless services, the speed delivered to the end customer is not distance dependent, rather it is dependent on the electronics deployed within the network and at the customer premise.

With respect to network management practices, SaskTel does not currently apply a **** Use Policy to its FTTP Internet services; subscribers are permitted to download/upload an unlimited amount of bandwidth each month.

The engineering assumption for SaskTel’s xDSL infrastructure is that a DSLAM shelf is provisioned to provide service for up to 192 customers. If required, additional DSLAM shelves can be added to the cabinets as customer demand increases in a given community. xDSL infrastructure is provisioned on an asymmetrical basis, with higher portions of the available bandwidth dedicated to download as opposed to upload. The speed available to the end customer is dependent on the length of the customers copper loop between their home and the DSLAM unit itself. With respect to network management practices, SaskTel does not currently apply a **** Use Policy to its DSL Internet services;

subscribers are permitted to download/upload an unlimited amount of bandwidth each month. Should network congestion become an issue for residential households in the proposed communities to serve, SaskTel will consider increasing capacity, DSLAM shelves, etc. at various components in the network to meet customer demand.

The engineering assumptions for SaskTel’s High **** Fusion wireless internet solution see each tower provisioned with up to three LTE-TDD sectors. With 20 MHz of bandwidth, each sector is capable of providing service to approximately FILED IN CONFIDENCE WITH THE CRTC

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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 65-90 customers dependent upon customer usage, distribution and received signal strength. LTE-TDD technology differs from mobile wireless LTE in that it utilizes one frequency of spectrum where transmit and receive channels take turns on the same frequency band. This allows asymmetric traffic assignment allowing for more bandwidth allocation to the download speed of the customer.

In the case of SaskTel’s deployment, SaskTel has chosen a ratio that provides 5 Mbps in the downlink direction and 1 Mbps in the uplink direction. Customers’ speeds are limited to 2 Mbps download and 256 Kbps upload after they reach their 50 GB monthly cap. Existing Fusion customers are currently using approximately 45 GB per month on average.

b) The engineering assumptions and service mix offered remain the same for FTTP deployments regardless of the geographic area in which the technology is deployed. SaskTel notes that the decision to extend a FTTP deployment is made on an economic basis as any deployment of FTTP in brownfield or greenfield areas is capital intensive due to the required installation of not only equipment, but new fibre feeder and distribution, GPON splitters and the placement of a fibre drop to each customer.

For xDSL solutions, engineering assumptions are based upon the customer loop length from the DSLAM cabinet. Different speed options are available dependent on the vintage of DSLAM provisioned (i.e. ADSL, VDSL or VDSL2) and the overall loop lengths of the customers served by the DSLAM unit itself.

For SaskTel’s High **** Fusion wireless Internet solution, all towers are provisioned in the same manner regardless of geographic location. While today only one speed option is offered as continued development occurs, LTE-TDD technology is envisioned to offer additional download/upload speeds and FILED IN CONFIDENCE WITH THE CRTC

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PAGE 4 OF 5
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION automatic adjustment of the upload to download ratios. Annual software and hardware upgrades typically increase the efficiencies and capacities of existing networks and the migration to LTE Advanced technology may allow for carrier aggregation in the future.

c) SaskTel notes the company does not apply any usage-based billing to either its wholesale or its retail services and does not collect the detailed usage records that would be required to do so. As such, it is unable to provide a response to the Commission regarding the average throughput bandwidth provided to each customer. That said, SaskTel has collected monthly outgoing internet traffic peaks leaving the SaskTel network and incoming internet traffic entering the SaskTel network since 2000. **** devices attached to SaskTel’s interconnected peering and transit interfaces collect the traffic peak statistic of the interface, and not individual user peak traffic for each internet service speed.

These probes do not include traffic that stays on the SaskTel network. Using a simple calculation of the annual traffic peak divided by total internet subscribers it is able to provide the following data:

Year
Assumption for throughput
bandwidth to each end user
(Kbps)
2010 #
2011 #
2012 #
2013 #
2014 #
# Filed in confidence with the CRTC
FILED IN CONFIDENCE WITH THE CRTC
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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION d) i) As noted above SaskTel does not have the data required to provide a response to part ii). However, it is able to provide the following assumed growth in throughput bandwidth to each end user utilizing similar simple calculations of the assumed annual traffic peak divided by total internet subscribers.

Year
Assumption for throughput
bandwidth to each end user
(Kbps)
2015 #
2016 #
2017 #
2018 #
2019 #
# Filed in confidence with the CRTC
***End of Document***
150714_SaskTel_Cvr_Ltr_NC15-134
SaskTel_CRTC_1
SaskTel_CRTC_10_ABR
SaskTel_CRTC_11_ABR
SaskTel_CRTC_9

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2395735 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - (PDF) 150714_SaskTel_Responses_RFIs_NC15-134_ABR.pdf
**** Hersche
Senior Director -
Regulatory Affairs
2121 Saskatchewan Drive
****, Saskatchewan
*** ***
Telephone: (306) 777-5346

Fax: (306) 565-6216 Electronic Fax: (306) 791-1457 Internet: ******@***.com

14 July 2015
via GCKey and e-mail
File No. 8663-C12-201503186
Mr. John Traversy
Secretary General
Canadian Radio-television and
Telecommunications Commission
Ottawa, ON *** ***
**** Mr. Traversy:

Re: Telecom Notice of Consultation CRTC 2015-134, Review of basic telecommunications services – Responses to Requests for Information 1. Pursuant to paragraph 44 of Telecom Notice of Consultation CRTC 2015-134, Review of basic telecommunications services, as amended by staff letter of 28 May, Saskatchewan Telecommunications (SaskTel) submits its responses to Requests for Information in the above noted proceeding.

2. Portions of the information provided in response to the interrogatories is provided in confidence in accordance with section 39 of the Telecommunications Act, section 32 of the Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission Rules of Practice and Procedure (CRTC Rules), Broadcasting and Telecom Information Bulletin CRTC 2010-961, and section 20 of the Access to Information Act.

3. This confidential information is commercially sensitive and is treated consistently in a confidential manner by SaskTel. Disclosure of the information provided could reasonably be expected to result in material financial loss and prejudice to the competitive position of SaskTel.

4. SaskTel submits portions of the following interrogatory responses in confidence with the Commission for the reason stated within the response.

SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-3 NC 2015-134
SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-4 NC 2015-134
SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-6 NC 2015-134
SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-7 NC 2015-134
SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-8 NC 2015-134
Mr. John Traversy
14 July 2015
**** 2 of 4
SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-9 NC 2015-134
SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-10 NC 2015-134
SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-11 NC 2015-134
Sincerely,
**** McKay
for **** Hersche
Senior Director - Regulatory Affairs
AM/nb
Attachments
cc: John Macri, CRTC, ******@***.com
**** Bailey, CRTC, ****.******@***.com

Distribution list as per CRTC letter of 28 May 2015 Mr. John Traversy

14 July 2015
**** 3 of 4
Distribution ****

******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com,

******@***.com, ******@***.com,

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14 July 2015
**** 4 of 4

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******@***.com, ******@***.com,

******@***.com, ******@***.com, helene.pellerin@saint-lambert.ca, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com

***End of Document***
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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. IDENTIFY THE NUMBER AND CORRESPONDING PERCENTAGE OF RESIDENTIAL CUSTOMERS SUBSCRIBING TO THE SERVICES LISTED BELOW AS OF DECEMBER 2014 BY EACH PROVINCE/TERRITORY WHERE THE COMPANY PROVIDES SERVICE:

A) THE LOWEST PRICED WIRELINE VOICE SERVICE; AND B) THE LOWEST PRICED POSTPAID MOBILE WIRELESS VOICE PLAN.

FOR EACH SERVICE, SPECIFY THE PERCENTAGE OF CUSTOMERS LOCATED IN I) HIGH COST SERVING AREAS (HCSAS) AND II) NON-HCSAS. PROVIDE A DESCRIPTION OF EACH SERVICE OFFERING (E.G. OPTIONAL SERVICES OR ENHANCED FEATURES; NUMBER OF LOCAL MINUTES FOR DAYTIME, EVENINGS, AND WEEKENDS; LONG DISTANCE MINUTES; NUMBER OF TEXT MESSAGES INCLUDED). SPECIFY 1) THE NON-DISCOUNTED PRICE FOR EACH SERVICE, 2) WHETHER THE PRICE IS AVAILABLE THROUGHOUT THE PROVINCE/TERRITORY PROVIDING THE REASONS FOR ANY DIFFERENCES, AND 3) ANY ADDITIONAL MONTHLY CHARGES THAT MAY APPLY.

A. a) In terms of residential wireline voice services, SaskTel provides service in its forborne and non-forborne exchanges in accordance with its General Tariff – Basic Services CRTC 21411 Item 110.12 – Network Access Service. The service includes individual local ****-Tone service with unlimited local calling within the customers’ exchange; access to low-speed internet at local rates;

access to the long distance network of the customers’ choice and to operator/directory services; and access to enhanced calling features, emergency services, message relay services and privacy and protection features. Also included is a listing in the local telephone book and one copy of the local telephone book per year.

The rate paid for wireline voice service varies based on the customer location within a rate band, as well as whether they are located inside or outside a base rate area.

SaskTel’s rate band structure is defined in General Tariff – Basic Services CRTC 21411 Item 100.12 – Rate Band Structure, and is provided below:

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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Band Description Classification

A Downtown core areas of **** and
Saskatoon.
Non-HCSA

B Remaining areas of the **** and Saskatoon exchanges.

Non-HCSA

C Exchange areas of Estevan, Moose Jaw, **** Battleford, Prince ****, **** Current, Yorkton, and Weyburn.

Non-HCSA
D Not Applicable to SaskTel. N/A

E Wire Centres with less than 1500 total Network Access Service (NAS).

HCSA

F Wire Centres with greater than 1500 total lines and less than 8000 total lines and where the average loop length is greater than 4

kilometres.
HCSA

G Wire Centres located north of the agricultural area of Saskatchewan as defined in SaskTel’s General Tariff-Basic Services on Extra

Provisioning Charges.
HCSA

Base Rate Areas are defined in General Tariff – Basic Services CRTC 21411 Item 82 as follows:

Base Rate Area - The specific section or part of an Exchange Area within which Local Access Services are furnished at basic monthly rates and contains the designated Rate Centre for toll and other Interexchange Services. The Base Rate Area has a serving central office.

Island Base Rate (IBRA) - An area within an Exchange Area, remote from the Base Rate Area, within which Local Access Services are furnished. It is billed at a basic monthly rate that is dependent upon Rate Band criteria; however, it is not the designated Rate Centre and does not necessarily have a serving central office. An Island Base Rate has a stable population of 50 or more permanent SASKTEL RESPONSE TO INTERROGATORY

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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION households or businesses with telephone service in close proximity with each other.

Please refer to the following table for information regarding the price paid for local voice service by rate band.

SaskTel notes that 46% of its residential wireline customers subscribe to service in HCSAs, while the remaining 54% are in non-HCSAs.

b) SaskTel’s lowest priced postpaid wireless voice plan is the Talk 25 plan at $25.00/month. The plan includes 100 daytime local minutes and unlimited local evening and weekend calling. The rate for additional daytime minutes is $0.30/minute, and long distance minutes are rated at $0.45/min for calls placed within Canada to Canada & the United States, and $1.50/min for calls placed Rate Band BRA/IBRA type ****/month

($)
A N/A 21.54
B Inside 21.54
B Outside 24.87
C Inside 22.00
C Outside 25.83
C Inside – former Rotary Dial
customers in ****
Battleford
19.50
C Outside – former Rotary Dial
customers in ****
Battleford
23.33
E Inside/Outside 30.64
F Inside/Outside 30.64
G Inside/Outside 30.64
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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION from the United States to Canada or the United States. The plan also includes Three-Way Calling, Call Transfer, Call Waiting and pay-per-use Text ($0.20/sent message) and Picture messaging ($0.75/sent message).

In terms of customer distribution for wireless customers, as the customers are mobile SaskTel is unable to determine with any high degree of certainty where the customer is located. However, based on telephone number assigned to the device, SaskTel notes that 49% of its wireless customers would be considered to subscribe to service in HCSAs, while the remaining 51% are in non-HCSAs.

***End of Document***
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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. IDENTIFY THE LOWEST PRICED PREPAID WIRELESS VOICE PLAN OFFERED AS OF DECEMBER 2014 BY EACH PROVINCE/TERRITORY WHERE THE COMPANY PROVIDES SERVICE. PROVIDE A DESCRIPTION OF THE SERVICE OFFERING, AS WELL AS ANY ASSOCIATED CONDITIONS (E.G. PER CALL CONNECTION, ROLL OVER MINUTES, OTHER ASSOCIATED CHARGES). INDICATE THE PRICE PER MINUTE OF A LOCAL CALL. SPECIFY WHETHER 1) THE PLAN IS OFFERED THROUGHOUT THE PROVINCE/TERRITORY, AND 2) THERE ARE DIFFERENCES IN PRICING FOR THAT PLAN ACROSS THE PROVINCE/TERRITORY PROVIDING THE REASONS FOR ANY DIFFERENCES.

A. The lowest priced prepaid wireless voice plan that SaskTel offers is its Prepaid Pay Per Use plan. This plan has a minimum $8.00/month charge and includes $0.10/minute local calling, $0.25/minute long distance calling, and $0.20 per SMS sent charges. Also included in the service are Mini Mail voice mail, call waiting, call transfer and three-way calling. As per all SaskTel wireless plans, the service is available at the same price across the entire province where SaskTel has wireless service available.

***End of Document***
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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. IDENTIFY, FOR EACH PROVINCE/TERRITORY WHERE THE COMPANY PROVIDES SERVICE, THE NUMBER AND CORRESPONDING PERCENTAGE OF YOUR RESIDENTIAL CUSTOMERS AS OF DECEMBER 2014 WHO WERE SUBSCRIBING TO A BROADBAND INTERNET PLAN CLOSEST TO THE COMMISSION’S TARGET SPEEDS OF 5 MEGABITS PER SECOND (MBPS) DOWNLOAD AND 1 MBPS UPLOAD.

SPECIFY THE PERCENTAGE OF THESE CUSTOMERS LOCATED IN I) HCSAS AND II) NON-HCSAS. PROVIDE A DESCRIPTION OF THE BROADBAND INTERNET PLAN (E.G. SPEEDS, DATA CAPS, OVERAGE CHARGES). SPECIFY 1) THE NON-DISCOUNTED PRICE FOR THE SERVICE, AND 2) WHETHER THE PRICE IS AVAILABLE THROUGHOUT THE PROVINCE/TERRITORY PROVIDING THE REASONS FOR ANY DIFFERENCES.

A. SaskTel is filing portions of this response in confidence with the Commission in accordance with section 39 of the Telecommunications Act, section 32 of the Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission Rules of Practice and Procedure (CRTC Rules), Broadcasting and Telecom Information Bulletin CRTC 2010-961, and section 20 of the Access to Information Act. Detailed demand information is treated consistently in a confidential manner by SaskTel. Release of this information on the public record would provide current and potential competitors with detailed knowledge of the types of broadband access demanded by SaskTel’s customers. This information would not normally be available to them and that would allow them to compete more effectively with SaskTel and that would prejudice the competitive position of the company, resulting in direct and material financial loss.

SaskTel had a total of # or 67% of its residential broadband subscribers subscribed to one of its broadband internet plans which were closest to the Commission’s target speed of 5 Mbps download and 1 Mbps upload. Of these customers, 58% were located in non-HCSAs, while the remaining 42% were located in HCSAs.

# Filed in confidence with the CRTC
#
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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Please refer to the following table regarding the broadband internet plans offered to customers which are closest to the Commission’s target speeds.

Service High ****
Plus
High ****
Basic
High ****
Fusion
HTS Satellite Internet
Availability 23 large
communities
288 smaller
communities
59 rural
towers
Within specific areas of
province within HTS
coverage area

Monthly Fee $49.95 $49.95 $79.95 $64.99 to $84.99 Upstream

(up to)
640 Kbps 640 Kbps 1 Mbps 1 Mbps
Downstream
(up to)
5 Mbps 5 Mbps 5 Mbps 5 Mbps
Monthly
Bandwidth

Unlimited Unlimited 50 GB 20 GB ($64.99) 30 GB ($74.95)

40 GB ($84.99)
Overage
Charges

N/A N/A N/A (Note 1) 20 GB – Soft cap (Note 2) 30 GB – Soft cap (Note 2)

40 GB - $5/GB

Note 1: Once a customer has reached the 50 GB monthly bandwidth cap, the customer’s speeds are reduced to 2 Mbps download and 256 Kbps upload for the remainder of their billing period, at which time full speed is restored.

Note 2: Once a customer has reached their monthly bandwidth cap, the customer’s speeds are reduced to 300 Kbps download and 100 Kbps upload for the remainder of their billing period, at which time full speed is restored.

SaskTel notes that the differences in rates between the above noted plans are based on the technology utilized to deliver the service. The DSL-based services are priced the same, while the High **** Fusion (based on LTE-TDD technology) and HTS Satellite Internet (based on HTS satellite technology) services are priced higher due to the additional cost incurred by the company to provision these services over their respective technologies.

***End of Document***
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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. IDENTIFY THE FIVE MOST POPULAR FEATURES (E.G. VOICEMAIL, CALL DISPLAY, EXTRA USAGE PLAN, EMAIL ACCOUNT) CHOSEN BY YOUR RESIDENTIAL CUSTOMERS FOR MOBILE WIRELESS SERVICES. PROVIDE A DESCRIPTION OF THOSE FEATURES (INCLUDING THE NON-DISCOUNTED PRICE) AND THE CORRESPONDING NUMBER AND PERCENTAGE OF CUSTOMERS SUBSCRIBING TO THEM. IN ADDITION, SPECIFY THE NUMBER AND PERCENTAGE OF THESE CUSTOMERS LOCATED IN I) HCSAS AND II) NON-HCSAS FOR EACH PROVINCE/TERRITORY WHERE THE COMPANY PROVIDES MOBILE WIRELESS SERVICE.

A. Pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act, SaskTel is filing demand related information in confidence with the Commission. The information in question is detailed information that is confidential and is treated consistently in a confidential manner by SaskTel. Release of this information on the public record would provide current and potential competitors with detailed knowledge of the use of SaskTel’s network by various carriers. This information would not normally be available to them and that would allow them to compete more effectively with SaskTel and that would prejudice the competitive position of the company, resulting in direct and material financial loss. An abridged version has been provided.

The five most popular features for mobile wireless services are as follows:

1) Text Messaging (SMS) – unlimited SMS ($13.00/month stand-alone) This feature includes unlimited sent text messages. SaskTel does not charge for incoming text messaging. Unlimited SMS can be purchased as a stand-alone subscription to any voice plan, or is included in many SaskTel converged rate plans.

2) Call Display – incoming/outgoing call display ($8.00/month stand-alone for incoming, outgoing free)

Call display has two distinct parts:
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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION i. Incoming Call Display – shows the number of an incoming cellular or landline call to a cellular phone.

ii. Outgoing Call Display – sends a cellular number to be displayed on other cellular or landline phones.

Customers can have incoming display, outgoing display or both. Call Display can be purchased as a stand-alone subscription to any voice plan, or is included in many SaskTel converged rate plans.

3) Unlimited Canada **** Distance add-on ($10.00/month) This feature provides unlimited calls from anywhere within Canada to anywhere in Canada or the U.S. (includes local and long distance airtime). It can be purchased as a stand-alone subscription.

4) Picture Messaging (MMS) ($0.75 per sent MMS) Picture/Video Messaging allows SaskTel customers – provided their wireless device is capable – to send and receive MMS (multimedia) messages (picture/video messages) with each other, as well as send and receive MMS (picture/video messages) with customers subscribed to other carriers.

Customers are charged per sent MMS unless they subscribe to a Wireless Data Service plan or Converged Wireless Rate Plan.

5) Voice Mail (Basic: $5.00/month, Enhanced: $10.00/month, Mini Mail:

$3.00/month)

The Voice Messaging Service answers calls when customers are away from their phone, already on their phone, too busy to answer their phone, or when their phone is turned off.

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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Customers can retrieve messages from wherever they are, 24 hours a day, using a cellular or landline phone. Alternatively, customers can access their voice mailbox online from SaskTel.com for free.

Basic and Enhanced voice mail services allow for 25 messages to be stored, have a message duration of 3 minutes and archives messages for 14 days. Mini Mail voice mail service allows for 5 messages to be stored, have a message duration of 2 minutes and archives messages for 7 days.

Please refer to the following table for demand values for these services.

Service Number of
subscribers
non-HCSA
Number of
subscribers
HCSA
Total
Number of
subscribers
Percentage
of
subscribers
Text Messaging (SMS) # # # 64.4%
Call Display # # # 70.2%
Canada Unlimited LD # # # 11.7%
Picture Messaging
(MMS)
# # # 51.4%
Voice Mail # # # 36.7%
# Filed in confidence with the CRTC
***End of Document***
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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. IDENTIFY THE NUMBER AND CORRESPONDING PERCENTAGE OF RESIDENTIAL CUSTOMERS SUBSCRIBING TO THE SERVICES LISTED BELOW AS OF DECEMBER 2014 FOR EACH PROVINCE/TERRITORY WHERE THE COMPANY PROVIDES SERVICE:

A) THE THREE MOST POPULAR WIRELINE VOICE PLANS; AND B) THE THREE MOST POPULAR WIRELINE INTERNET PLANS.

SPECIFY THE PERCENTAGE OF THESE CUSTOMERS LOCATED IN I) HCSAS AND II) NON-HCSAS. PROVIDE A DESCRIPTION OF EACH SERVICE OFFERING (E.G.

OPTIONAL SERVICES; NUMBER OF LOCAL MINUTES FOR DAYTIME, EVENINGS, AND WEEKENDS; LONG DISTANCE MINUTES; SPEEDS, DATA CAPS, OVERAGE CHARGES). SPECIFY THE NON-DISCOUNTED PRICE FOR THE SERVICE AND ANY ADDITIONAL MONTHLY CHARGES THAT MAY APPLY.

A. a) SaskTel does not provide wireline voice plans, and is therefore unable to provide a response as requested. Rather, customers purchase network access service from SaskTel which includes individual local ****-Tone service with unlimited local calling within the customer’s exchange; access to low-speed internet at local rates; access to the long distance network of the customers’ choice and to operator/directory services; access to enhanced calling features, emergency services, message relay services and privacy and protection features. Also included is a listing in the local telephone book and one copy of the local telephone book per year.

Rates and demand numbers for basic local service are provided in SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-1 NC 2015-134. Customers wishing to add enhanced features or long distance packages to their basic service are able to do so with stand-alone features, a feature package or a long distance plan.

b) Please refer to the following table regarding the three most popular wireline internet plans:

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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Plan Download

****
(Mbps)
Upload
****
(Kbps)
****
($)
% of
customers
in HCSA
(Note 1)
% of
customers in
non-HCSA
(Note 2)
High ****
Basic
1.5 or 5.0* 128 or
640*
49.95 21.3% 0.03%
High ****
Classic
1.5 384 39.95 0.63% 13.36%
High ****
Plus
5.0 640 49.95 8.88% 39.00%

Note 1: For the specific service out of total High **** customers Note 2: For the specific service out of total High **** customers * Customers in eligible communities receive 5.0 Mbps download/640 Kbps upload speeds

All High **** Internet plans listed above receive 10 SaskTel.net email addresses with 1 GB of storage each, 24/7 technical support, Unlimited Usage, and modem.

***End of Document***
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PAGE 1 OF 2
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. PROVIDE THE MONTHLY AVERAGE USAGE OF DATA [IN GIGABYTES (GB)] FOR RESIDENTIAL CUSTOMERS FOR THE YEAR 2014 FOR I) WIRELINE INTERNET SERVICE, AND II) MOBILE WIRELESS INTERNET SERVICE.

A. Pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act, SaskTel is filing demand related information in confidence with the Commission. The information in question is detailed information that is confidential and is treated consistently in a confidential manner by SaskTel. Release of this information on the public record would provide current and potential competitors with detailed knowledge of the use of SaskTel’s network by various carriers. This information would not normally be available to them and that would allow them to compete more effectively with SaskTel and that would prejudice the competitive position of the company, resulting in direct and material financial loss. An abridged version has been provided.

i) SaskTel does not collect user statistics that would be used to determine the average usage of residential customers for customers that are provisioned over Fibre to the Premise (FTTP) or Digital Subscriber Line (DSL) technology. As such, it is unable to provide a response to the question posed for customers served by those technologies.

It does collect monthly usage per subscriber on its High **** Fusion fixed wireless service, and these totals are provided in the table below. Please note that SaskTel commercially launched its Fusion product in **** of 2014, therefore data is only available from that point forward.

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PAGE 2 OF 2
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Month

Average customer
usage (GB)
Apr #
May #
Jun #
Jul #
Aug #
Sep #
Oct #
Nov #
Dec #

ii) On average, SaskTel wireless users consumed # GB of data each month in 2014. A detailed month by month breakdown for 2014 is not available.

# Filed in confidence with the CRTC
***End of Document***
#
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PAGE 1 OF 8
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. FOR EACH CATEGORY OF TELECOMMUNICATIONS SERVICE (I.E. WIRELINE VOICE, MOBILE WIRELESS VOICE, WIRELINE INTERNET, MOBILE WIRELESS INTERNET, FIXED WIRELESS INTERNET AND SATELLITE INTERNET) PROVIDED BY YOUR COMPANY, IDENTIFY AND DESCRIBE WHAT SERVICE OFFERINGS (E.G. DISCOUNTED PLANS, SPECIAL PRICING) OR INITIATIVES (E.G. BILL MANAGEMENT TOOLS, TOLL DENIAL) ARE AVAILABLE TO ASSIST CERTAIN SEGMENTS OF THE POPULATION FOR WHICH ACCESS OR AFFORDABILITY MAY BE A CONCERN, SUCH AS SENIORS, LOW INCOME CANADIANS, PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES, AND STUDENTS. DESCRIBE ANY OTHER SIMILAR OFFERINGS OR INITIATIVES THAT ARE AVAILABLE TO OTHER SPECIFIC SEGMENTS OF THE POPULATION. PROVIDE FOR THE YEAR 2014, THE NUMBER AND PERCENTAGE OF CUSTOMERS WHO USED THESE OFFERINGS OR INITIATIVES.

A. Pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act, SaskTel is filing demand related information in confidence with the Commission. The information in question is detailed information that is confidential and is treated consistently in a confidential manner by SaskTel. Release of this information on the public record would provide current and potential competitors with detailed knowledge of the use of SaskTel’s network by various carriers. This information would not normally be available to them and that would allow them to compete more effectively with SaskTel and that would prejudice the competitive position of the company, resulting in direct and material financial loss. An abridged version has been provided.

SaskTel has a number of service offerings that are available to certain segments of the population for which access or affordability may affect their ability to procure telecommunications products and services.

Wireline Voice Service

Bad Debt Repayment Plan – General Tariff Basic Services 21411 - Item 170.10 The Bad Debt Repayment Plan (BDRPP) is a one-time offering to residential customers that assists them in paying back their outstanding bad debt(s) with SaskTel. Customers under BDRPP will receive access to SaskTel’s basic telephone service but they must FILED IN CONFIDENCE WITH THE CRTC

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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION subscribe to Residential **** Management Tools (total toll restriction) and agree to the repayment schedule and associated conditions under BDRPP. BDRPP will be activated at time of installation.

SaskTel currently has # customers or 0.005% of its residential customers on this plan.

Toll Restrictor - General Tariff Basic Services 21411 - Item 170.15 Toll Restrictor curbs a telephone user’s ability to make long distance calls, access 900/976 service, or access Directory Assistance (DA) and Directory Assistance Call Completion (DACC). Toll Restriction is provided within the software of SaskTel’s switches.

SaskTel currently has # customers or 6.4% of its residential customers on this plan.

Residential **** Management Tools - General Tariff Basic Services 21411 - Item 170.05 Residential **** Management Tools are services which enable residential customers to acquire basic telephone service while restricting access to the long distance (LD) network. The type of toll restriction determines what LD network services can be accessed.

The Installment **** Plan also enables the customer’s service connection charge for network access and terminal equipment to be paid over a period of up to six months.

SaskTel is unable to accurately provide the number of customers on these plans as they are not tracked and would require extensive manual effort to determine the number.

# Filed in confidence with the CRTC
#
#
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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Wireless Voice Services

School Bus Safety Plan

SaskTel offers a cellular plan exclusively for cellular phones in vehicles that transport children to and from school and school-related events.

The plan is $15.00/month and includes 60 minutes of local calling with additional minutes being rates at $0.50/minute.

SaskTel currently has # customers on this plan.

Incoming and Outgoing Call Denial

SaskTel offers Call Denial service to customers wishing to restrict the calling patterns on their cellular devices. With Outgoing Call Denial, customers are only able to receive calls, while Incoming Call Denial only allows customers to place outgoing calls.

SaskTel currently has # customers on this plan.

Toll Denial (CDMA network only)

SaskTel offers Toll Denial service to its CDMA customers that allow them to only place local calls. The customer is still able to receive incoming long distance calls from other customers.

SaskTel currently has # customers on this plan.

Special Needs

SaskTel has undertaken many activities to ensure that persons with disabilities have equal and full access to telecommunications and/or programming products and services.

# Filed in confidence with the CRTC
#
#
#
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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION SaskTel is adhering to the many requirements established by the Commission to reduce obstacles to the delivery and receipt of communication services to disabled people. At times, most often at the request of the Saskatchewan disabled community, SaskTel has adopted specific programs or services that exceed national goals.

Telecommunications

The following is a list of special needs telecommunications services that SaskTel provides to disabled persons in Saskatchewan. SaskTel notes that it does not readily track the number of customers who utilize its special needs services:

- SaskTel provides alternate format phone bill and bill inserts using either Braille large print, or diskettes, depending on the request of the end customer.

- Directory Assistance is provided to registered special needs customers at no charge. SaskTel also provides directory assistance call completion at no charge for these customers.

- Telewriters (TTY) allow for communication by typed messages over telephone lines. A Telewriter unit is provided to Registered Users (deaf or speech impaired) at no charge. A second Telewriter can be requested for a Principal Contact, also provided at no charge.

- Telephone Ring Signaller is available at no charge to Registered TTY User.

- SaskTel Relay Service (SRS) assists TTY and IP Relay users to place and receive telephone calls from other TTY/IP Relay users and non-TTY/IP Relay users 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

- Toll calls made through SaskTel’s Relay Service receive a 50% discount.

- Voice Carry Over (VCO) and Hearing Carry Over (HCO) allow TTY users to speak for themselves and use the TTY to read the response of the other party.

Hearing Carry Over TTY users can listen to the other party and use the TTY to type their message. There are no additional charges for VCO and HCO options and no special equipment is required, just a standard TTY.

- TTY Directory Designation is an option for disabled persons where they can have the code TTY displayed following their listed name in the DirectWest directory to FILED IN CONFIDENCE WITH THE CRTC

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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION allow readers to recognize that the customer listed has a Telewriter. There is no charge for this service.

- Voicemail to Text service converts voice mails into text. The converted messages are then delivered as an email or as a text message to the customers’ cell phone. The service is available as pay-per-use or through various service plans.

- Online Voice Mail service allows customers with vision or mobility disabilities to fully administer their voice mail service via the internet and a personal computer or web-enabled device, rather than using a telephone set. The service allows the customer to listen to and manage their messages, change greetings, and to set up new message notifications to be sent to email or text message, in addition to all other administrative options via a secure website. There is no charge for this service.

- In conjunction with the Canadian Paraplegic Association, SaskTel provides a special cellular rate plan for its members. It includes free network access and 100 free minutes a month, Three-Way Calling, Call Transfer and Call Waiting. All other options and additional minutes are chargeable to the user.

- Artificial Larynx Machines are devices that make speech possible for individuals with speech impairments. SaskTel will provide one Artificial Larynx Machine to customers with a speech disability at no charge.

- Telephone Ring Signaller and ringer amplifiers are available.

- Stand-alone ringers for single-line sets and amplified photo telephones are available.

- **** call is available at no charge. (Approved users) - Big button phones are available.

- Teletrainers (telephone simulators) are provided free of charge to people and organizations that request them. These units include instructional videos, pamphlets, and booklets and are used mainly through schools for Special Education classes and with young children to teach them how to properly use the telephone.

In Saskatchewan, payphones also have a number of features available that provide accessibility to deaf or hearing impaired subscribers:

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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION - All payphones are hearing aid compatible.

- All payphones provide connectability and signal compatibility for customer-provided TTYs and Voice Carry Over (VCO) devices.

- All payphones allow connection to SaskTel Relay Service (local calls from payphones which use SRS are free of charge, and toll calls using SRS are made at reduced rates).

- Each Millennium payphone has a volume control button and some payphones have a built-in data jack which can be connected to a portable computer.

- The majority of Millennium payphones are equipped with a Keypad TTY solution, which allows deaf or hearing impaired customers to use the telephone keypad in a manner similar to cellular text messaging in order to place TTY calls. SaskTel is continuing to install the Keypad TTY solution, with the goal of having all Millennium payphones equipped, as to comply with the directives from the CRTC in Telecom Decision CRTC 2004-47, Access to pay telephone service.

- Where demand exists, payphones are permanently-equipped with TTYs. Such payphones are marked with the universal TTY symbol.

Broadcasting

SaskTel maxTV™ Service offers the following features and services to address the needs of persons with disabilities:

- An Interactive Program Guide is incorporated into the digital set top box. It allows customers to search current and future programming, and to develop customized channel line-ups by using the Favorites menu option. With this option, customers can more easily access programming that is tailored to their needs, such as Closed Captioning programming or Described Video channels.

- Described Video programming provides a narrative description of a television program’s key visual elements so that blind or visually impaired customers understand what is occurring on the screen. SaskTel currently passes through described video programming for local, over-the-air signals and nine specialty programming services, and is in compliance with the Commission’s determinations in regards to Described Video.

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PAGE 7 OF 8
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION - Closed Captioning enables deaf and hearing impaired customers to read what is happening in programming. SaskTel passes through closed captioning provided by programming services and is increasingly offering closed captioning on maxTV™ Video on Demand.

- VoicePrint is a national reading service that provides programming of benefit to blind or visually impaired customers. It provides full-text reading of stories, information, news and features published by a variety of newspapers, magazines and periodicals.

Student Promotions

SaskTel offers a number of specific promotions aimed at the student market. These offers apply to part or full time Saskatchewan post-secondary students with a valid Student ID for the 2015/2016 academic year. SaskTel is unable to provide accurate take rates for these promotions given the constant turnover associated with providing services to the student population.

Internet

Eligible students receive infiNET High **** Mach I (100 Mbps down/20 Mbps up) for $30.00 per month (regular $99.95/month) or High **** Ultra (25 Mbps down/2 Mbps up) for $25.00 per month (regular $79.95/month).

Wireless

Students receive $20.00 per month off select premium cellular plans when they activate a new smartphone on a 2 year contract. These plans are shown below:

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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Ultimate

70
Students get it for
$50/mo.**
Regular $70/mo.
 Unlimited local minutes
 150 Canadian long
distance minutes
 10 GB of Canada-wide
data
 Unlimited text, picture and
video messaging
 Call Display and Mini
Voice Mail
Ultimate 13th
Man
Students get it for
$65/mo.**
Regular $85/mo.
 Unlimited local minutes
 Unlimited long distance
minutes
 13 GB of Canada-wide
data
 Unlimited text, picture and
video messaging
 Call Display and
Enhanced Voice Mail
Ultimate 100
Students get it for
$80/mo.**
Regular $100/mo.
 Unlimited local minutes
 Unlimited long distance
minutes
 Unlimited Canada-wide
data
 Unlimited text, picture and
video messaging
 Call Display and Enhanced
Voice Mail
maxTV™ and Internet:

Students also are eligible to receive a promotion on basic maxTV entertainment services in conjunction with High **** Internet. For students in fibre-served areas they can package basic maxTV and infiNET Mach I for $60.00/month (regular $126.95), while those in DSL-served areas can package maxTV and High **** Plus (10 Mbps down/800 Kbps up) for $50.00/month (regular $76.95).

***End of Document***

http://www.sasktel.com/store/view-plan-by-type/browse/Personal/Wireless/Rate-plans/Voice-and-data-plans/_/N-270whttp://www.sasktel.com/store/view-plan-by-type/browse/Personal/Wireless/Rate-plans/Voice-and-data-plans/_/N-270whttp://www.sasktel.com/store/view-plan-by-type/browse/Personal/Wireless/Rate-plans/Voice-and-data-plans/_/N-270whttp://www.sasktel.com/store/view-plan-by-type/browse/Personal/Wireless/Rate-plans/Voice-and-data-plans/_/N-270whttp://www.sasktel.com/store/view-plan-by-type/browse/Personal/Wireless/Rate-plans/Voice-and-data-plans/_/N-270wFILED IN CONFIDENCE WITH THE CRTC

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PAGE 1 OF 2
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. WITH RESPECT TO YOUR COMPANY’S OPERATING TERRITORY, PROVIDE THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION FOR INTERNET SERVICES (EXCLUDING DIAL-UP) THAT YOU OFFER:

A) THE TOTAL NUMBER OF HOUSEHOLDS THAT YOUR COMPANY IS CAPABLE OF SERVING;

B) THE TOTAL NUMBER OF HOUSEHOLDS SERVED BY YOUR COMPANY;

AND

C) THE TOTAL NUMBER OF HOUSEHOLDS SERVED THAT MEET THE COMMISSION’S BROADBAND INTERNET TARGET SPEEDS OF 5 MBPS DOWNLOAD / 1 MBPS UPLOAD.

A. Pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act, SaskTel is filing demand related information in confidence with the Commission. The information in question is detailed information that is confidential and is treated consistently in a confidential manner by SaskTel. Release of this information on the public record would provide current and potential competitors with detailed knowledge of the use of SaskTel’s network by various carriers. This information would not normally be available to them and that would allow them to compete more effectively with SaskTel and that would prejudice the competitive position of the company, resulting in direct and material financial loss. An abridged version has been provided.

a) SaskTel does not directly track the number of households it is capable of serving.

However, utilizing 2011 census data it assumes it is capable of serving approximately 336,209 households within the province.

b) As of 31 May 2015, SaskTel currently serves # households with internet services excluding dial-up.

# Filed in confidence with the CRTC
#
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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION c) As of 31 May 2015, SaskTel currently serves # customers with an internet service that meets or exceeds the Commission’s broadband internet target speeds of 5 Mbps download/1 Mbps upload. That said, SaskTel notes that it serves an additional # households with broadband internet service at speeds of 5 Mbps download/640 Kbps upload and an additional # households with broadband internet service at speeds of 10 Mbps download/800 Kbps upload. SaskTel notes that these speeds do meet or exceed the Commission's targets with respect to download speeds, which is what SaskTel's customers are concerned with. The customer experience gained with increasing upload speeds from 640 Kbps or 800 Kbps to 1 Mbps would be negligible and come at an uneconomic cost.

# Filed in confidence with the CRTC
***End of Document***
#
#
#
SASKTEL RESPONSE TO INTERROGATORY

14 JULY 2015 SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-9 NC 2015-134 PAGE 1 OF 2

INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. WITH RESPECT TO YOUR COMPANY’S OPERATING TERRITORY, PROVIDE THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION FOR AREAS THAT ARE CURRENTLY UNSERVED OR UNDERSERVED AS OF DECEMBER 2014:

A) THE TECHNOLOGIES USED IN THE ACCESS FACILITIES FOR SERVING SUBSCRIBERS (OR HOUSEHOLDS), SUCH AS FIXED WIRELESS ACCESS (LICENSED OR UNLICENSED), SATELLITE (DIRECT TO HOME), CABLE MODEM, DIGITAL SUBSCRIBER LINE (DSL), FIBRE-OPTICS AND MOBILE WIRELESS;

B) FOR EACH TECHNOLOGY IN (A) ABOVE, THE AVERAGE UPSTREAM AND DOWNSTREAM INTERNET SPEEDS THAT YOU OFFER;

C) THE TECHNOLOGIES USED FOR CONNECTING TO THE POP AND AVERAGE CAPACITIES IN MBPS TO / FROM THE POP); AND D) A MAP SHOWING YOUR OPERATING TERRITORY WITH THE TYPES AND LOCATIONS OF ACCESS FACILITIES IN MAPINFO OR COMPATIBLE FORMAT.

A. In regards to the responses to this question, SaskTel is defining unserved and underserved areas to be those areas where it provides internet service, excluding dial-up, which does not meet the Commission’s target speed of 5 Mbps download and 1 Mbps upload. In unserved areas, SaskTel provides no service.

a) SaskTel provides broadband internet service to unserved and underserved areas utilizing wireline xDSL and licensed fixed wireless LTE-TDD technology operating at 2500 MHz. SaskTel does provide mobile wireless coverage in these areas, however, it does not market these services as a broadband internet service.

b) xDSL technology is provisioned to provide speeds of up to 5 Mbps download/640 Kbps upload as well as 10 Mbps download/800 Kbps upload in these areas. In very minimal areas, the service is provided at 1.5 Mbps download/128 Kbps upload. This is dependent upon the length of the customer’s service drop from the DSLAM unit, the speed profile for the community SaskTel has provisioned, and the package chosen by the customer. Fixed wireless over LTE-TDD is SASKTEL RESPONSE TO INTERROGATORY

14 JULY 2015 SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-9 NC 2015-134 PAGE 2 OF 2

INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION provisioned to provide speeds of up to 5 Mbps download/1 Mbps upload to end customers.

c) The vast majority of POPs in SaskTel’s network are connected to the main SaskTel internet infrastructure utilizing Fibre backhaul. There are a very limited number of POPs that connect via licensed Microwave radio or copper based DS1’s.

d) Please see SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-9 NC 2015-134 ATTACHMENT 1.

***End of Document***
FILED IN CONFIDENCE WITH THE CRTC
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PAGE 1 OF 2
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. WITH RESPECT TO YOUR COMPANY’S OPERATING TERRITORY, PROVIDE THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION IN AREAS THAT ARE CURRENTLY UNSERVED OR UNDERSERVED AS OF DECEMBER 2014:

A) THE TOTAL NUMBER OF POPS;

B) THE TECHNOLOGIES USED FOR BACKHAUL TO / FROM EACH POP;

C) FOR EACH TECHNOLOGY PROVIDED IN RESPONSE TO B. ABOVE, I) TOTAL AVAILABLE CAPACITY IN MBPS (TO / FROM THE POP), AND II) TOTAL CAPACITY CURRENTLY USED BROKEN DOWN BY PEAK AND NON-PEAK USAGE PERIODS; AND

D) A MAP SHOWING YOUR OPERATING AREA WITH THE TYPES AND LOCATIONS OF POPS IN MAPINFO OR COMPATIBLE FORMAT.

A. Pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act, SaskTel is filing detailed network component location and provisioning related information in confidence with the Commission. The information in question is detailed information that is confidential and is treated consistently in a confidential manner by SaskTel. Release of this information on the public record would provide current and potential competitors with detailed knowledge of the use of SaskTel’s network by various carriers. This information would not normally be available to them and that would allow them to compete more effectively with SaskTel and that would prejudice the competitive position of the company, resulting in direct and material financial loss. An abridged version of the attachment has not been provided as it would be meaningless.

In regards to the responses to this question, SaskTel is defining unserved and underserved areas to be those areas where it provides internet service, excluding dial-up, which does not meet the Commission’s target speed of 5 Mbps download and 1 Mbps upload.

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PAGE 2 OF 2
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION a) SaskTel has a total of # POPs in underserved or unserved areas within the province.

b) The vast majority of POPs in SaskTel’s network are connected to the main SaskTel internet infrastructure utilizing Fibre backhaul. There are a very limited number of POPs that connect via licensed Microwave radio or copper-based DS1’s.

c) SaskTel has sufficient capacity to meet demand at each one of its POPs. The exact amount of capacity available and used would vary for every POP. An aggregated value for either of these measures is not available and would, in any case, be meaningless as the relevant capacity gap is that which exists at each individual POP. An average value would also not illustrate individual areas of concern. In any case, SaskTel does not provision its network in this manner which is why the information is not available. Rather, for the SaskTel IP Core and Regional Ethernet Transport, Subject Matter Experts review weekly reports on all links and cross sections augmenting capacity when reaching the threshold utilization of # and some cases having to augment prior to reaching the threshold trigger due to provisioning time frames.

d) Please see SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-10 NC 2015-134 ATTACHMENT 1.

# Filed in confidence with the CRTC
***End of Document***
#
#
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PAGE 1 OF 5
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. TO BETTER UNDERSTAND HISTORICAL AND PROJECTED NETWORK UTILIZATION AND DEMAND FOR BROADBAND INTERNET ACCESS SERVICES, PROVIDE RESPONSES TO THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS.

A) DESCRIBE THE VARIOUS ENGINEERING ASSUMPTIONS ASSOCIATED WITH NETWORK DEPLOYMENTS/UPGRADES, SUCH AS PERCENTAGE OF ACTIVE USERS (I.E. HOUSEHOLDS) AT PEAK PERIODS AND AT OTHER TIMES OF DAY, AS WELL AS THEIR PEAK USAGE DEMANDS. PROVIDE THE OVERSUBSCRIPTION RATIOS USED.

B) ARE DIFFERENT ENGINEERING ASSUMPTIONS UTILIZED WHEN PLANNING NETWORK DEPLOYMENTS/UPGRADES IN DIFFERENT GEOGRAPHIC AREAS, WHEN DIFFERENT TECHNOLOGIES ARE USED, OR WHERE DIFFERENT SPEED TIERS ARE OFFERED TO END USERS? IF YES, PLEASE EXPLAIN THESE DIFFERENCES.

C) FOR EACH OF THE YEARS 2010 TO 2014, PROVIDE 1) THE NETWORK ENGINEERING ASSUMPTION FOR THROUGHPUT BANDWIDTH ALLOCATED TO EACH END USER EXPRESSED IN KILOBITS PER SECOND (KBPS) (I.E. ENGINEERED THROUGHPUT), AND 2) THE AVERAGE VOLUME OF DATA USED PER END USER EXPRESSED IN GIGABYTES (GB) PER MONTH.

D) FOR EACH OF THE YEARS 2015 TO 2019, PROVIDE THE FORECASTS FOR THE INFORMATION REQUESTED IN PART C) ABOVE.

A. Pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act, SaskTel is filing detailed network demand related information in confidence with the Commission. The information in question is detailed information that is confidential and is treated consistently in a confidential manner by SaskTel. Release of this information on the public record would provide current and potential competitors with detailed knowledge of SaskTel’s network design. This information would not normally be available to them and that would allow them to compete more effectively with SaskTel and that would prejudice the competitive position of the company, resulting in direct and material financial loss. An abridged version is been provided for the public record.

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PAGE 2 OF 5
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION a) For FTTP, the engineering assumption is that the Optical Line Terminal (OLT) is capable of serving up to 2048 customers, provisioned via a fibre drop and with GPON based service within a 15KM to 30KM radius dependent on equipment vintage. Unlike copper based xDSL or fixed wireless services, the speed delivered to the end customer is not distance dependent, rather it is dependent on the electronics deployed within the network and at the customer premise.

With respect to network management practices, SaskTel does not currently apply a **** Use Policy to its FTTP Internet services; subscribers are permitted to download/upload an unlimited amount of bandwidth each month.

The engineering assumption for SaskTel’s xDSL infrastructure is that a DSLAM shelf is provisioned to provide service for up to 192 customers. If required, additional DSLAM shelves can be added to the cabinets as customer demand increases in a given community. xDSL infrastructure is provisioned on an asymmetrical basis, with higher portions of the available bandwidth dedicated to download as opposed to upload. The speed available to the end customer is dependent on the length of the customers copper loop between their home and the DSLAM unit itself. With respect to network management practices, SaskTel does not currently apply a **** Use Policy to its DSL Internet services;

subscribers are permitted to download/upload an unlimited amount of bandwidth each month. Should network congestion become an issue for residential households in the proposed communities to serve, SaskTel will consider increasing capacity, DSLAM shelves, etc. at various components in the network to meet customer demand.

The engineering assumptions for SaskTel’s High **** Fusion wireless internet solution see each tower provisioned with up to three LTE-TDD sectors. With 20 MHz of bandwidth, each sector is capable of providing service to approximately FILED IN CONFIDENCE WITH THE CRTC

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PAGE 3 OF 5
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 65-90 customers dependent upon customer usage, distribution and received signal strength. LTE-TDD technology differs from mobile wireless LTE in that it utilizes one frequency of spectrum where transmit and receive channels take turns on the same frequency band. This allows asymmetric traffic assignment allowing for more bandwidth allocation to the download speed of the customer.

In the case of SaskTel’s deployment, SaskTel has chosen a ratio that provides 5 Mbps in the downlink direction and 1 Mbps in the uplink direction. Customers’ speeds are limited to 2 Mbps download and 256 Kbps upload after they reach their 50 GB monthly cap. Existing Fusion customers are currently using approximately 45 GB per month on average.

b) The engineering assumptions and service mix offered remain the same for FTTP deployments regardless of the geographic area in which the technology is deployed. SaskTel notes that the decision to extend a FTTP deployment is made on an economic basis as any deployment of FTTP in brownfield or greenfield areas is capital intensive due to the required installation of not only equipment, but new fibre feeder and distribution, GPON splitters and the placement of a fibre drop to each customer.

For xDSL solutions, engineering assumptions are based upon the customer loop length from the DSLAM cabinet. Different speed options are available dependent on the vintage of DSLAM provisioned (i.e. ADSL, VDSL or VDSL2) and the overall loop lengths of the customers served by the DSLAM unit itself.

For SaskTel’s High **** Fusion wireless Internet solution, all towers are provisioned in the same manner regardless of geographic location. While today only one speed option is offered as continued development occurs, LTE-TDD technology is envisioned to offer additional download/upload speeds and FILED IN CONFIDENCE WITH THE CRTC

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PAGE 4 OF 5
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION automatic adjustment of the upload to download ratios. Annual software and hardware upgrades typically increase the efficiencies and capacities of existing networks and the migration to LTE Advanced technology may allow for carrier aggregation in the future.

c) SaskTel notes the company does not apply any usage-based billing to either its wholesale or its retail services and does not collect the detailed usage records that would be required to do so. As such, it is unable to provide a response to the Commission regarding the average throughput bandwidth provided to each customer. That said, SaskTel has collected monthly outgoing internet traffic peaks leaving the SaskTel network and incoming internet traffic entering the SaskTel network since 2000. **** devices attached to SaskTel’s interconnected peering and transit interfaces collect the traffic peak statistic of the interface, and not individual user peak traffic for each internet service speed.

These probes do not include traffic that stays on the SaskTel network. Using a simple calculation of the annual traffic peak divided by total internet subscribers it is able to provide the following data:

Year
Assumption for throughput
bandwidth to each end user
(Kbps)
2010 #
2011 #
2012 #
2013 #
2014 #
# Filed in confidence with the CRTC
FILED IN CONFIDENCE WITH THE CRTC
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PAGE 5 OF 5
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION d) i) As noted above SaskTel does not have the data required to provide a response to part ii). However, it is able to provide the following assumed growth in throughput bandwidth to each end user utilizing similar simple calculations of the assumed annual traffic peak divided by total internet subscribers.

Year
Assumption for throughput
bandwidth to each end user
(Kbps)
2015 #
2016 #
2017 #
2018 #
2019 #
# Filed in confidence with the CRTC
***End of Document***
150714_SaskTel_Cvr_Ltr_NC15-134
SaskTel_CRTC_1
SaskTel_CRTC_10_ABR
SaskTel_CRTC_11_ABR
SaskTel_CRTC_9

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2395735 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - (PDF) 150714_SaskTel_Responses_RFIs_NC15-134_ABR.pdf
**** Hersche
Senior Director -
Regulatory Affairs
2121 Saskatchewan Drive
****, Saskatchewan
*** ***
Telephone: (306) 777-5346

Fax: (306) 565-6216 Electronic Fax: (306) 791-1457 Internet: ******@***.com

14 July 2015
via GCKey and e-mail
File No. 8663-C12-201503186
Mr. John Traversy
Secretary General
Canadian Radio-television and
Telecommunications Commission
Ottawa, ON *** ***
**** Mr. Traversy:

Re: Telecom Notice of Consultation CRTC 2015-134, Review of basic telecommunications services – Responses to Requests for Information 1. Pursuant to paragraph 44 of Telecom Notice of Consultation CRTC 2015-134, Review of basic telecommunications services, as amended by staff letter of 28 May, Saskatchewan Telecommunications (SaskTel) submits its responses to Requests for Information in the above noted proceeding.

2. Portions of the information provided in response to the interrogatories is provided in confidence in accordance with section 39 of the Telecommunications Act, section 32 of the Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission Rules of Practice and Procedure (CRTC Rules), Broadcasting and Telecom Information Bulletin CRTC 2010-961, and section 20 of the Access to Information Act.

3. This confidential information is commercially sensitive and is treated consistently in a confidential manner by SaskTel. Disclosure of the information provided could reasonably be expected to result in material financial loss and prejudice to the competitive position of SaskTel.

4. SaskTel submits portions of the following interrogatory responses in confidence with the Commission for the reason stated within the response.

SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-3 NC 2015-134
SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-4 NC 2015-134
SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-6 NC 2015-134
SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-7 NC 2015-134
SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-8 NC 2015-134
Mr. John Traversy
14 July 2015
**** 2 of 4
SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-9 NC 2015-134
SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-10 NC 2015-134
SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-11 NC 2015-134
Sincerely,
**** McKay
for **** Hersche
Senior Director - Regulatory Affairs
AM/nb
Attachments
cc: John Macri, CRTC, ******@***.com
**** Bailey, CRTC, ****.******@***.com

Distribution list as per CRTC letter of 28 May 2015 Mr. John Traversy

14 July 2015
**** 3 of 4
Distribution ****

******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com,

******@***.com, ******@***.com,

******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ****.******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com,

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14 July 2015
**** 4 of 4

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******@***.com, ******@***.com,

******@***.com, ******@***.com, helene.pellerin@saint-lambert.ca, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com

***End of Document***
SASKTEL RESPONSE TO INTERROGATORY

14 JULY 2015 SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-1 NC 2015-134 PAGE 1 OF 4

INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. IDENTIFY THE NUMBER AND CORRESPONDING PERCENTAGE OF RESIDENTIAL CUSTOMERS SUBSCRIBING TO THE SERVICES LISTED BELOW AS OF DECEMBER 2014 BY EACH PROVINCE/TERRITORY WHERE THE COMPANY PROVIDES SERVICE:

A) THE LOWEST PRICED WIRELINE VOICE SERVICE; AND B) THE LOWEST PRICED POSTPAID MOBILE WIRELESS VOICE PLAN.

FOR EACH SERVICE, SPECIFY THE PERCENTAGE OF CUSTOMERS LOCATED IN I) HIGH COST SERVING AREAS (HCSAS) AND II) NON-HCSAS. PROVIDE A DESCRIPTION OF EACH SERVICE OFFERING (E.G. OPTIONAL SERVICES OR ENHANCED FEATURES; NUMBER OF LOCAL MINUTES FOR DAYTIME, EVENINGS, AND WEEKENDS; LONG DISTANCE MINUTES; NUMBER OF TEXT MESSAGES INCLUDED). SPECIFY 1) THE NON-DISCOUNTED PRICE FOR EACH SERVICE, 2) WHETHER THE PRICE IS AVAILABLE THROUGHOUT THE PROVINCE/TERRITORY PROVIDING THE REASONS FOR ANY DIFFERENCES, AND 3) ANY ADDITIONAL MONTHLY CHARGES THAT MAY APPLY.

A. a) In terms of residential wireline voice services, SaskTel provides service in its forborne and non-forborne exchanges in accordance with its General Tariff – Basic Services CRTC 21411 Item 110.12 – Network Access Service. The service includes individual local ****-Tone service with unlimited local calling within the customers’ exchange; access to low-speed internet at local rates;

access to the long distance network of the customers’ choice and to operator/directory services; and access to enhanced calling features, emergency services, message relay services and privacy and protection features. Also included is a listing in the local telephone book and one copy of the local telephone book per year.

The rate paid for wireline voice service varies based on the customer location within a rate band, as well as whether they are located inside or outside a base rate area.

SaskTel’s rate band structure is defined in General Tariff – Basic Services CRTC 21411 Item 100.12 – Rate Band Structure, and is provided below:

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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Band Description Classification

A Downtown core areas of **** and
Saskatoon.
Non-HCSA

B Remaining areas of the **** and Saskatoon exchanges.

Non-HCSA

C Exchange areas of Estevan, Moose Jaw, **** Battleford, Prince ****, **** Current, Yorkton, and Weyburn.

Non-HCSA
D Not Applicable to SaskTel. N/A

E Wire Centres with less than 1500 total Network Access Service (NAS).

HCSA

F Wire Centres with greater than 1500 total lines and less than 8000 total lines and where the average loop length is greater than 4

kilometres.
HCSA

G Wire Centres located north of the agricultural area of Saskatchewan as defined in SaskTel’s General Tariff-Basic Services on Extra

Provisioning Charges.
HCSA

Base Rate Areas are defined in General Tariff – Basic Services CRTC 21411 Item 82 as follows:

Base Rate Area - The specific section or part of an Exchange Area within which Local Access Services are furnished at basic monthly rates and contains the designated Rate Centre for toll and other Interexchange Services. The Base Rate Area has a serving central office.

Island Base Rate (IBRA) - An area within an Exchange Area, remote from the Base Rate Area, within which Local Access Services are furnished. It is billed at a basic monthly rate that is dependent upon Rate Band criteria; however, it is not the designated Rate Centre and does not necessarily have a serving central office. An Island Base Rate has a stable population of 50 or more permanent SASKTEL RESPONSE TO INTERROGATORY

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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION households or businesses with telephone service in close proximity with each other.

Please refer to the following table for information regarding the price paid for local voice service by rate band.

SaskTel notes that 46% of its residential wireline customers subscribe to service in HCSAs, while the remaining 54% are in non-HCSAs.

b) SaskTel’s lowest priced postpaid wireless voice plan is the Talk 25 plan at $25.00/month. The plan includes 100 daytime local minutes and unlimited local evening and weekend calling. The rate for additional daytime minutes is $0.30/minute, and long distance minutes are rated at $0.45/min for calls placed within Canada to Canada & the United States, and $1.50/min for calls placed Rate Band BRA/IBRA type ****/month

($)
A N/A 21.54
B Inside 21.54
B Outside 24.87
C Inside 22.00
C Outside 25.83
C Inside – former Rotary Dial
customers in ****
Battleford
19.50
C Outside – former Rotary Dial
customers in ****
Battleford
23.33
E Inside/Outside 30.64
F Inside/Outside 30.64
G Inside/Outside 30.64
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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION from the United States to Canada or the United States. The plan also includes Three-Way Calling, Call Transfer, Call Waiting and pay-per-use Text ($0.20/sent message) and Picture messaging ($0.75/sent message).

In terms of customer distribution for wireless customers, as the customers are mobile SaskTel is unable to determine with any high degree of certainty where the customer is located. However, based on telephone number assigned to the device, SaskTel notes that 49% of its wireless customers would be considered to subscribe to service in HCSAs, while the remaining 51% are in non-HCSAs.

***End of Document***
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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. IDENTIFY THE LOWEST PRICED PREPAID WIRELESS VOICE PLAN OFFERED AS OF DECEMBER 2014 BY EACH PROVINCE/TERRITORY WHERE THE COMPANY PROVIDES SERVICE. PROVIDE A DESCRIPTION OF THE SERVICE OFFERING, AS WELL AS ANY ASSOCIATED CONDITIONS (E.G. PER CALL CONNECTION, ROLL OVER MINUTES, OTHER ASSOCIATED CHARGES). INDICATE THE PRICE PER MINUTE OF A LOCAL CALL. SPECIFY WHETHER 1) THE PLAN IS OFFERED THROUGHOUT THE PROVINCE/TERRITORY, AND 2) THERE ARE DIFFERENCES IN PRICING FOR THAT PLAN ACROSS THE PROVINCE/TERRITORY PROVIDING THE REASONS FOR ANY DIFFERENCES.

A. The lowest priced prepaid wireless voice plan that SaskTel offers is its Prepaid Pay Per Use plan. This plan has a minimum $8.00/month charge and includes $0.10/minute local calling, $0.25/minute long distance calling, and $0.20 per SMS sent charges. Also included in the service are Mini Mail voice mail, call waiting, call transfer and three-way calling. As per all SaskTel wireless plans, the service is available at the same price across the entire province where SaskTel has wireless service available.

***End of Document***
FILED IN CONFIDENCE WITH THE CRTC
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PAGE 1 OF 2
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. IDENTIFY, FOR EACH PROVINCE/TERRITORY WHERE THE COMPANY PROVIDES SERVICE, THE NUMBER AND CORRESPONDING PERCENTAGE OF YOUR RESIDENTIAL CUSTOMERS AS OF DECEMBER 2014 WHO WERE SUBSCRIBING TO A BROADBAND INTERNET PLAN CLOSEST TO THE COMMISSION’S TARGET SPEEDS OF 5 MEGABITS PER SECOND (MBPS) DOWNLOAD AND 1 MBPS UPLOAD.

SPECIFY THE PERCENTAGE OF THESE CUSTOMERS LOCATED IN I) HCSAS AND II) NON-HCSAS. PROVIDE A DESCRIPTION OF THE BROADBAND INTERNET PLAN (E.G. SPEEDS, DATA CAPS, OVERAGE CHARGES). SPECIFY 1) THE NON-DISCOUNTED PRICE FOR THE SERVICE, AND 2) WHETHER THE PRICE IS AVAILABLE THROUGHOUT THE PROVINCE/TERRITORY PROVIDING THE REASONS FOR ANY DIFFERENCES.

A. SaskTel is filing portions of this response in confidence with the Commission in accordance with section 39 of the Telecommunications Act, section 32 of the Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission Rules of Practice and Procedure (CRTC Rules), Broadcasting and Telecom Information Bulletin CRTC 2010-961, and section 20 of the Access to Information Act. Detailed demand information is treated consistently in a confidential manner by SaskTel. Release of this information on the public record would provide current and potential competitors with detailed knowledge of the types of broadband access demanded by SaskTel’s customers. This information would not normally be available to them and that would allow them to compete more effectively with SaskTel and that would prejudice the competitive position of the company, resulting in direct and material financial loss.

SaskTel had a total of # or 67% of its residential broadband subscribers subscribed to one of its broadband internet plans which were closest to the Commission’s target speed of 5 Mbps download and 1 Mbps upload. Of these customers, 58% were located in non-HCSAs, while the remaining 42% were located in HCSAs.

# Filed in confidence with the CRTC
#
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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Please refer to the following table regarding the broadband internet plans offered to customers which are closest to the Commission’s target speeds.

Service High ****
Plus
High ****
Basic
High ****
Fusion
HTS Satellite Internet
Availability 23 large
communities
288 smaller
communities
59 rural
towers
Within specific areas of
province within HTS
coverage area

Monthly Fee $49.95 $49.95 $79.95 $64.99 to $84.99 Upstream

(up to)
640 Kbps 640 Kbps 1 Mbps 1 Mbps
Downstream
(up to)
5 Mbps 5 Mbps 5 Mbps 5 Mbps
Monthly
Bandwidth

Unlimited Unlimited 50 GB 20 GB ($64.99) 30 GB ($74.95)

40 GB ($84.99)
Overage
Charges

N/A N/A N/A (Note 1) 20 GB – Soft cap (Note 2) 30 GB – Soft cap (Note 2)

40 GB - $5/GB

Note 1: Once a customer has reached the 50 GB monthly bandwidth cap, the customer’s speeds are reduced to 2 Mbps download and 256 Kbps upload for the remainder of their billing period, at which time full speed is restored.

Note 2: Once a customer has reached their monthly bandwidth cap, the customer’s speeds are reduced to 300 Kbps download and 100 Kbps upload for the remainder of their billing period, at which time full speed is restored.

SaskTel notes that the differences in rates between the above noted plans are based on the technology utilized to deliver the service. The DSL-based services are priced the same, while the High **** Fusion (based on LTE-TDD technology) and HTS Satellite Internet (based on HTS satellite technology) services are priced higher due to the additional cost incurred by the company to provision these services over their respective technologies.

***End of Document***
FILED IN CONFIDENCE WITH THE CRTC
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PAGE 1 OF 3
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. IDENTIFY THE FIVE MOST POPULAR FEATURES (E.G. VOICEMAIL, CALL DISPLAY, EXTRA USAGE PLAN, EMAIL ACCOUNT) CHOSEN BY YOUR RESIDENTIAL CUSTOMERS FOR MOBILE WIRELESS SERVICES. PROVIDE A DESCRIPTION OF THOSE FEATURES (INCLUDING THE NON-DISCOUNTED PRICE) AND THE CORRESPONDING NUMBER AND PERCENTAGE OF CUSTOMERS SUBSCRIBING TO THEM. IN ADDITION, SPECIFY THE NUMBER AND PERCENTAGE OF THESE CUSTOMERS LOCATED IN I) HCSAS AND II) NON-HCSAS FOR EACH PROVINCE/TERRITORY WHERE THE COMPANY PROVIDES MOBILE WIRELESS SERVICE.

A. Pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act, SaskTel is filing demand related information in confidence with the Commission. The information in question is detailed information that is confidential and is treated consistently in a confidential manner by SaskTel. Release of this information on the public record would provide current and potential competitors with detailed knowledge of the use of SaskTel’s network by various carriers. This information would not normally be available to them and that would allow them to compete more effectively with SaskTel and that would prejudice the competitive position of the company, resulting in direct and material financial loss. An abridged version has been provided.

The five most popular features for mobile wireless services are as follows:

1) Text Messaging (SMS) – unlimited SMS ($13.00/month stand-alone) This feature includes unlimited sent text messages. SaskTel does not charge for incoming text messaging. Unlimited SMS can be purchased as a stand-alone subscription to any voice plan, or is included in many SaskTel converged rate plans.

2) Call Display – incoming/outgoing call display ($8.00/month stand-alone for incoming, outgoing free)

Call display has two distinct parts:
FILED IN CONFIDENCE WITH THE CRTC
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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION i. Incoming Call Display – shows the number of an incoming cellular or landline call to a cellular phone.

ii. Outgoing Call Display – sends a cellular number to be displayed on other cellular or landline phones.

Customers can have incoming display, outgoing display or both. Call Display can be purchased as a stand-alone subscription to any voice plan, or is included in many SaskTel converged rate plans.

3) Unlimited Canada **** Distance add-on ($10.00/month) This feature provides unlimited calls from anywhere within Canada to anywhere in Canada or the U.S. (includes local and long distance airtime). It can be purchased as a stand-alone subscription.

4) Picture Messaging (MMS) ($0.75 per sent MMS) Picture/Video Messaging allows SaskTel customers – provided their wireless device is capable – to send and receive MMS (multimedia) messages (picture/video messages) with each other, as well as send and receive MMS (picture/video messages) with customers subscribed to other carriers.

Customers are charged per sent MMS unless they subscribe to a Wireless Data Service plan or Converged Wireless Rate Plan.

5) Voice Mail (Basic: $5.00/month, Enhanced: $10.00/month, Mini Mail:

$3.00/month)

The Voice Messaging Service answers calls when customers are away from their phone, already on their phone, too busy to answer their phone, or when their phone is turned off.

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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Customers can retrieve messages from wherever they are, 24 hours a day, using a cellular or landline phone. Alternatively, customers can access their voice mailbox online from SaskTel.com for free.

Basic and Enhanced voice mail services allow for 25 messages to be stored, have a message duration of 3 minutes and archives messages for 14 days. Mini Mail voice mail service allows for 5 messages to be stored, have a message duration of 2 minutes and archives messages for 7 days.

Please refer to the following table for demand values for these services.

Service Number of
subscribers
non-HCSA
Number of
subscribers
HCSA
Total
Number of
subscribers
Percentage
of
subscribers
Text Messaging (SMS) # # # 64.4%
Call Display # # # 70.2%
Canada Unlimited LD # # # 11.7%
Picture Messaging
(MMS)
# # # 51.4%
Voice Mail # # # 36.7%
# Filed in confidence with the CRTC
***End of Document***
SASKTEL RESPONSE TO INTERROGATORY

14 JULY 2015 SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-5 NC 2015-134 PAGE 1 OF 2

INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. IDENTIFY THE NUMBER AND CORRESPONDING PERCENTAGE OF RESIDENTIAL CUSTOMERS SUBSCRIBING TO THE SERVICES LISTED BELOW AS OF DECEMBER 2014 FOR EACH PROVINCE/TERRITORY WHERE THE COMPANY PROVIDES SERVICE:

A) THE THREE MOST POPULAR WIRELINE VOICE PLANS; AND B) THE THREE MOST POPULAR WIRELINE INTERNET PLANS.

SPECIFY THE PERCENTAGE OF THESE CUSTOMERS LOCATED IN I) HCSAS AND II) NON-HCSAS. PROVIDE A DESCRIPTION OF EACH SERVICE OFFERING (E.G.

OPTIONAL SERVICES; NUMBER OF LOCAL MINUTES FOR DAYTIME, EVENINGS, AND WEEKENDS; LONG DISTANCE MINUTES; SPEEDS, DATA CAPS, OVERAGE CHARGES). SPECIFY THE NON-DISCOUNTED PRICE FOR THE SERVICE AND ANY ADDITIONAL MONTHLY CHARGES THAT MAY APPLY.

A. a) SaskTel does not provide wireline voice plans, and is therefore unable to provide a response as requested. Rather, customers purchase network access service from SaskTel which includes individual local ****-Tone service with unlimited local calling within the customer’s exchange; access to low-speed internet at local rates; access to the long distance network of the customers’ choice and to operator/directory services; access to enhanced calling features, emergency services, message relay services and privacy and protection features. Also included is a listing in the local telephone book and one copy of the local telephone book per year.

Rates and demand numbers for basic local service are provided in SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-1 NC 2015-134. Customers wishing to add enhanced features or long distance packages to their basic service are able to do so with stand-alone features, a feature package or a long distance plan.

b) Please refer to the following table regarding the three most popular wireline internet plans:

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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Plan Download

****
(Mbps)
Upload
****
(Kbps)
****
($)
% of
customers
in HCSA
(Note 1)
% of
customers in
non-HCSA
(Note 2)
High ****
Basic
1.5 or 5.0* 128 or
640*
49.95 21.3% 0.03%
High ****
Classic
1.5 384 39.95 0.63% 13.36%
High ****
Plus
5.0 640 49.95 8.88% 39.00%

Note 1: For the specific service out of total High **** customers Note 2: For the specific service out of total High **** customers * Customers in eligible communities receive 5.0 Mbps download/640 Kbps upload speeds

All High **** Internet plans listed above receive 10 SaskTel.net email addresses with 1 GB of storage each, 24/7 technical support, Unlimited Usage, and modem.

***End of Document***
FILED IN CONFIDENCE WITH THE CRTC
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PAGE 1 OF 2
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. PROVIDE THE MONTHLY AVERAGE USAGE OF DATA [IN GIGABYTES (GB)] FOR RESIDENTIAL CUSTOMERS FOR THE YEAR 2014 FOR I) WIRELINE INTERNET SERVICE, AND II) MOBILE WIRELESS INTERNET SERVICE.

A. Pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act, SaskTel is filing demand related information in confidence with the Commission. The information in question is detailed information that is confidential and is treated consistently in a confidential manner by SaskTel. Release of this information on the public record would provide current and potential competitors with detailed knowledge of the use of SaskTel’s network by various carriers. This information would not normally be available to them and that would allow them to compete more effectively with SaskTel and that would prejudice the competitive position of the company, resulting in direct and material financial loss. An abridged version has been provided.

i) SaskTel does not collect user statistics that would be used to determine the average usage of residential customers for customers that are provisioned over Fibre to the Premise (FTTP) or Digital Subscriber Line (DSL) technology. As such, it is unable to provide a response to the question posed for customers served by those technologies.

It does collect monthly usage per subscriber on its High **** Fusion fixed wireless service, and these totals are provided in the table below. Please note that SaskTel commercially launched its Fusion product in **** of 2014, therefore data is only available from that point forward.

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PAGE 2 OF 2
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Month

Average customer
usage (GB)
Apr #
May #
Jun #
Jul #
Aug #
Sep #
Oct #
Nov #
Dec #

ii) On average, SaskTel wireless users consumed # GB of data each month in 2014. A detailed month by month breakdown for 2014 is not available.

# Filed in confidence with the CRTC
***End of Document***
#
FILED IN CONFIDENCE WITH THE CRTC
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PAGE 1 OF 8
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. FOR EACH CATEGORY OF TELECOMMUNICATIONS SERVICE (I.E. WIRELINE VOICE, MOBILE WIRELESS VOICE, WIRELINE INTERNET, MOBILE WIRELESS INTERNET, FIXED WIRELESS INTERNET AND SATELLITE INTERNET) PROVIDED BY YOUR COMPANY, IDENTIFY AND DESCRIBE WHAT SERVICE OFFERINGS (E.G. DISCOUNTED PLANS, SPECIAL PRICING) OR INITIATIVES (E.G. BILL MANAGEMENT TOOLS, TOLL DENIAL) ARE AVAILABLE TO ASSIST CERTAIN SEGMENTS OF THE POPULATION FOR WHICH ACCESS OR AFFORDABILITY MAY BE A CONCERN, SUCH AS SENIORS, LOW INCOME CANADIANS, PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES, AND STUDENTS. DESCRIBE ANY OTHER SIMILAR OFFERINGS OR INITIATIVES THAT ARE AVAILABLE TO OTHER SPECIFIC SEGMENTS OF THE POPULATION. PROVIDE FOR THE YEAR 2014, THE NUMBER AND PERCENTAGE OF CUSTOMERS WHO USED THESE OFFERINGS OR INITIATIVES.

A. Pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act, SaskTel is filing demand related information in confidence with the Commission. The information in question is detailed information that is confidential and is treated consistently in a confidential manner by SaskTel. Release of this information on the public record would provide current and potential competitors with detailed knowledge of the use of SaskTel’s network by various carriers. This information would not normally be available to them and that would allow them to compete more effectively with SaskTel and that would prejudice the competitive position of the company, resulting in direct and material financial loss. An abridged version has been provided.

SaskTel has a number of service offerings that are available to certain segments of the population for which access or affordability may affect their ability to procure telecommunications products and services.

Wireline Voice Service

Bad Debt Repayment Plan – General Tariff Basic Services 21411 - Item 170.10 The Bad Debt Repayment Plan (BDRPP) is a one-time offering to residential customers that assists them in paying back their outstanding bad debt(s) with SaskTel. Customers under BDRPP will receive access to SaskTel’s basic telephone service but they must FILED IN CONFIDENCE WITH THE CRTC

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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION subscribe to Residential **** Management Tools (total toll restriction) and agree to the repayment schedule and associated conditions under BDRPP. BDRPP will be activated at time of installation.

SaskTel currently has # customers or 0.005% of its residential customers on this plan.

Toll Restrictor - General Tariff Basic Services 21411 - Item 170.15 Toll Restrictor curbs a telephone user’s ability to make long distance calls, access 900/976 service, or access Directory Assistance (DA) and Directory Assistance Call Completion (DACC). Toll Restriction is provided within the software of SaskTel’s switches.

SaskTel currently has # customers or 6.4% of its residential customers on this plan.

Residential **** Management Tools - General Tariff Basic Services 21411 - Item 170.05 Residential **** Management Tools are services which enable residential customers to acquire basic telephone service while restricting access to the long distance (LD) network. The type of toll restriction determines what LD network services can be accessed.

The Installment **** Plan also enables the customer’s service connection charge for network access and terminal equipment to be paid over a period of up to six months.

SaskTel is unable to accurately provide the number of customers on these plans as they are not tracked and would require extensive manual effort to determine the number.

# Filed in confidence with the CRTC
#
#
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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Wireless Voice Services

School Bus Safety Plan

SaskTel offers a cellular plan exclusively for cellular phones in vehicles that transport children to and from school and school-related events.

The plan is $15.00/month and includes 60 minutes of local calling with additional minutes being rates at $0.50/minute.

SaskTel currently has # customers on this plan.

Incoming and Outgoing Call Denial

SaskTel offers Call Denial service to customers wishing to restrict the calling patterns on their cellular devices. With Outgoing Call Denial, customers are only able to receive calls, while Incoming Call Denial only allows customers to place outgoing calls.

SaskTel currently has # customers on this plan.

Toll Denial (CDMA network only)

SaskTel offers Toll Denial service to its CDMA customers that allow them to only place local calls. The customer is still able to receive incoming long distance calls from other customers.

SaskTel currently has # customers on this plan.

Special Needs

SaskTel has undertaken many activities to ensure that persons with disabilities have equal and full access to telecommunications and/or programming products and services.

# Filed in confidence with the CRTC
#
#
#
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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION SaskTel is adhering to the many requirements established by the Commission to reduce obstacles to the delivery and receipt of communication services to disabled people. At times, most often at the request of the Saskatchewan disabled community, SaskTel has adopted specific programs or services that exceed national goals.

Telecommunications

The following is a list of special needs telecommunications services that SaskTel provides to disabled persons in Saskatchewan. SaskTel notes that it does not readily track the number of customers who utilize its special needs services:

- SaskTel provides alternate format phone bill and bill inserts using either Braille large print, or diskettes, depending on the request of the end customer.

- Directory Assistance is provided to registered special needs customers at no charge. SaskTel also provides directory assistance call completion at no charge for these customers.

- Telewriters (TTY) allow for communication by typed messages over telephone lines. A Telewriter unit is provided to Registered Users (deaf or speech impaired) at no charge. A second Telewriter can be requested for a Principal Contact, also provided at no charge.

- Telephone Ring Signaller is available at no charge to Registered TTY User.

- SaskTel Relay Service (SRS) assists TTY and IP Relay users to place and receive telephone calls from other TTY/IP Relay users and non-TTY/IP Relay users 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

- Toll calls made through SaskTel’s Relay Service receive a 50% discount.

- Voice Carry Over (VCO) and Hearing Carry Over (HCO) allow TTY users to speak for themselves and use the TTY to read the response of the other party.

Hearing Carry Over TTY users can listen to the other party and use the TTY to type their message. There are no additional charges for VCO and HCO options and no special equipment is required, just a standard TTY.

- TTY Directory Designation is an option for disabled persons where they can have the code TTY displayed following their listed name in the DirectWest directory to FILED IN CONFIDENCE WITH THE CRTC

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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION allow readers to recognize that the customer listed has a Telewriter. There is no charge for this service.

- Voicemail to Text service converts voice mails into text. The converted messages are then delivered as an email or as a text message to the customers’ cell phone. The service is available as pay-per-use or through various service plans.

- Online Voice Mail service allows customers with vision or mobility disabilities to fully administer their voice mail service via the internet and a personal computer or web-enabled device, rather than using a telephone set. The service allows the customer to listen to and manage their messages, change greetings, and to set up new message notifications to be sent to email or text message, in addition to all other administrative options via a secure website. There is no charge for this service.

- In conjunction with the Canadian Paraplegic Association, SaskTel provides a special cellular rate plan for its members. It includes free network access and 100 free minutes a month, Three-Way Calling, Call Transfer and Call Waiting. All other options and additional minutes are chargeable to the user.

- Artificial Larynx Machines are devices that make speech possible for individuals with speech impairments. SaskTel will provide one Artificial Larynx Machine to customers with a speech disability at no charge.

- Telephone Ring Signaller and ringer amplifiers are available.

- Stand-alone ringers for single-line sets and amplified photo telephones are available.

- **** call is available at no charge. (Approved users) - Big button phones are available.

- Teletrainers (telephone simulators) are provided free of charge to people and organizations that request them. These units include instructional videos, pamphlets, and booklets and are used mainly through schools for Special Education classes and with young children to teach them how to properly use the telephone.

In Saskatchewan, payphones also have a number of features available that provide accessibility to deaf or hearing impaired subscribers:

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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION - All payphones are hearing aid compatible.

- All payphones provide connectability and signal compatibility for customer-provided TTYs and Voice Carry Over (VCO) devices.

- All payphones allow connection to SaskTel Relay Service (local calls from payphones which use SRS are free of charge, and toll calls using SRS are made at reduced rates).

- Each Millennium payphone has a volume control button and some payphones have a built-in data jack which can be connected to a portable computer.

- The majority of Millennium payphones are equipped with a Keypad TTY solution, which allows deaf or hearing impaired customers to use the telephone keypad in a manner similar to cellular text messaging in order to place TTY calls. SaskTel is continuing to install the Keypad TTY solution, with the goal of having all Millennium payphones equipped, as to comply with the directives from the CRTC in Telecom Decision CRTC 2004-47, Access to pay telephone service.

- Where demand exists, payphones are permanently-equipped with TTYs. Such payphones are marked with the universal TTY symbol.

Broadcasting

SaskTel maxTV™ Service offers the following features and services to address the needs of persons with disabilities:

- An Interactive Program Guide is incorporated into the digital set top box. It allows customers to search current and future programming, and to develop customized channel line-ups by using the Favorites menu option. With this option, customers can more easily access programming that is tailored to their needs, such as Closed Captioning programming or Described Video channels.

- Described Video programming provides a narrative description of a television program’s key visual elements so that blind or visually impaired customers understand what is occurring on the screen. SaskTel currently passes through described video programming for local, over-the-air signals and nine specialty programming services, and is in compliance with the Commission’s determinations in regards to Described Video.

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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION - Closed Captioning enables deaf and hearing impaired customers to read what is happening in programming. SaskTel passes through closed captioning provided by programming services and is increasingly offering closed captioning on maxTV™ Video on Demand.

- VoicePrint is a national reading service that provides programming of benefit to blind or visually impaired customers. It provides full-text reading of stories, information, news and features published by a variety of newspapers, magazines and periodicals.

Student Promotions

SaskTel offers a number of specific promotions aimed at the student market. These offers apply to part or full time Saskatchewan post-secondary students with a valid Student ID for the 2015/2016 academic year. SaskTel is unable to provide accurate take rates for these promotions given the constant turnover associated with providing services to the student population.

Internet

Eligible students receive infiNET High **** Mach I (100 Mbps down/20 Mbps up) for $30.00 per month (regular $99.95/month) or High **** Ultra (25 Mbps down/2 Mbps up) for $25.00 per month (regular $79.95/month).

Wireless

Students receive $20.00 per month off select premium cellular plans when they activate a new smartphone on a 2 year contract. These plans are shown below:

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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Ultimate

70
Students get it for
$50/mo.**
Regular $70/mo.
 Unlimited local minutes
 150 Canadian long
distance minutes
 10 GB of Canada-wide
data
 Unlimited text, picture and
video messaging
 Call Display and Mini
Voice Mail
Ultimate 13th
Man
Students get it for
$65/mo.**
Regular $85/mo.
 Unlimited local minutes
 Unlimited long distance
minutes
 13 GB of Canada-wide
data
 Unlimited text, picture and
video messaging
 Call Display and
Enhanced Voice Mail
Ultimate 100
Students get it for
$80/mo.**
Regular $100/mo.
 Unlimited local minutes
 Unlimited long distance
minutes
 Unlimited Canada-wide
data
 Unlimited text, picture and
video messaging
 Call Display and Enhanced
Voice Mail
maxTV™ and Internet:

Students also are eligible to receive a promotion on basic maxTV entertainment services in conjunction with High **** Internet. For students in fibre-served areas they can package basic maxTV and infiNET Mach I for $60.00/month (regular $126.95), while those in DSL-served areas can package maxTV and High **** Plus (10 Mbps down/800 Kbps up) for $50.00/month (regular $76.95).

***End of Document***

http://www.sasktel.com/store/view-plan-by-type/browse/Personal/Wireless/Rate-plans/Voice-and-data-plans/_/N-270whttp://www.sasktel.com/store/view-plan-by-type/browse/Personal/Wireless/Rate-plans/Voice-and-data-plans/_/N-270whttp://www.sasktel.com/store/view-plan-by-type/browse/Personal/Wireless/Rate-plans/Voice-and-data-plans/_/N-270whttp://www.sasktel.com/store/view-plan-by-type/browse/Personal/Wireless/Rate-plans/Voice-and-data-plans/_/N-270whttp://www.sasktel.com/store/view-plan-by-type/browse/Personal/Wireless/Rate-plans/Voice-and-data-plans/_/N-270wFILED IN CONFIDENCE WITH THE CRTC

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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. WITH RESPECT TO YOUR COMPANY’S OPERATING TERRITORY, PROVIDE THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION FOR INTERNET SERVICES (EXCLUDING DIAL-UP) THAT YOU OFFER:

A) THE TOTAL NUMBER OF HOUSEHOLDS THAT YOUR COMPANY IS CAPABLE OF SERVING;

B) THE TOTAL NUMBER OF HOUSEHOLDS SERVED BY YOUR COMPANY;

AND

C) THE TOTAL NUMBER OF HOUSEHOLDS SERVED THAT MEET THE COMMISSION’S BROADBAND INTERNET TARGET SPEEDS OF 5 MBPS DOWNLOAD / 1 MBPS UPLOAD.

A. Pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act, SaskTel is filing demand related information in confidence with the Commission. The information in question is detailed information that is confidential and is treated consistently in a confidential manner by SaskTel. Release of this information on the public record would provide current and potential competitors with detailed knowledge of the use of SaskTel’s network by various carriers. This information would not normally be available to them and that would allow them to compete more effectively with SaskTel and that would prejudice the competitive position of the company, resulting in direct and material financial loss. An abridged version has been provided.

a) SaskTel does not directly track the number of households it is capable of serving.

However, utilizing 2011 census data it assumes it is capable of serving approximately 336,209 households within the province.

b) As of 31 May 2015, SaskTel currently serves # households with internet services excluding dial-up.

# Filed in confidence with the CRTC
#
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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION c) As of 31 May 2015, SaskTel currently serves # customers with an internet service that meets or exceeds the Commission’s broadband internet target speeds of 5 Mbps download/1 Mbps upload. That said, SaskTel notes that it serves an additional # households with broadband internet service at speeds of 5 Mbps download/640 Kbps upload and an additional # households with broadband internet service at speeds of 10 Mbps download/800 Kbps upload. SaskTel notes that these speeds do meet or exceed the Commission's targets with respect to download speeds, which is what SaskTel's customers are concerned with. The customer experience gained with increasing upload speeds from 640 Kbps or 800 Kbps to 1 Mbps would be negligible and come at an uneconomic cost.

# Filed in confidence with the CRTC
***End of Document***
#
#
#
SASKTEL RESPONSE TO INTERROGATORY

14 JULY 2015 SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-9 NC 2015-134 PAGE 1 OF 2

INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. WITH RESPECT TO YOUR COMPANY’S OPERATING TERRITORY, PROVIDE THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION FOR AREAS THAT ARE CURRENTLY UNSERVED OR UNDERSERVED AS OF DECEMBER 2014:

A) THE TECHNOLOGIES USED IN THE ACCESS FACILITIES FOR SERVING SUBSCRIBERS (OR HOUSEHOLDS), SUCH AS FIXED WIRELESS ACCESS (LICENSED OR UNLICENSED), SATELLITE (DIRECT TO HOME), CABLE MODEM, DIGITAL SUBSCRIBER LINE (DSL), FIBRE-OPTICS AND MOBILE WIRELESS;

B) FOR EACH TECHNOLOGY IN (A) ABOVE, THE AVERAGE UPSTREAM AND DOWNSTREAM INTERNET SPEEDS THAT YOU OFFER;

C) THE TECHNOLOGIES USED FOR CONNECTING TO THE POP AND AVERAGE CAPACITIES IN MBPS TO / FROM THE POP); AND D) A MAP SHOWING YOUR OPERATING TERRITORY WITH THE TYPES AND LOCATIONS OF ACCESS FACILITIES IN MAPINFO OR COMPATIBLE FORMAT.

A. In regards to the responses to this question, SaskTel is defining unserved and underserved areas to be those areas where it provides internet service, excluding dial-up, which does not meet the Commission’s target speed of 5 Mbps download and 1 Mbps upload. In unserved areas, SaskTel provides no service.

a) SaskTel provides broadband internet service to unserved and underserved areas utilizing wireline xDSL and licensed fixed wireless LTE-TDD technology operating at 2500 MHz. SaskTel does provide mobile wireless coverage in these areas, however, it does not market these services as a broadband internet service.

b) xDSL technology is provisioned to provide speeds of up to 5 Mbps download/640 Kbps upload as well as 10 Mbps download/800 Kbps upload in these areas. In very minimal areas, the service is provided at 1.5 Mbps download/128 Kbps upload. This is dependent upon the length of the customer’s service drop from the DSLAM unit, the speed profile for the community SaskTel has provisioned, and the package chosen by the customer. Fixed wireless over LTE-TDD is SASKTEL RESPONSE TO INTERROGATORY

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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION provisioned to provide speeds of up to 5 Mbps download/1 Mbps upload to end customers.

c) The vast majority of POPs in SaskTel’s network are connected to the main SaskTel internet infrastructure utilizing Fibre backhaul. There are a very limited number of POPs that connect via licensed Microwave radio or copper based DS1’s.

d) Please see SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-9 NC 2015-134 ATTACHMENT 1.

***End of Document***
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PAGE 1 OF 2
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. WITH RESPECT TO YOUR COMPANY’S OPERATING TERRITORY, PROVIDE THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION IN AREAS THAT ARE CURRENTLY UNSERVED OR UNDERSERVED AS OF DECEMBER 2014:

A) THE TOTAL NUMBER OF POPS;

B) THE TECHNOLOGIES USED FOR BACKHAUL TO / FROM EACH POP;

C) FOR EACH TECHNOLOGY PROVIDED IN RESPONSE TO B. ABOVE, I) TOTAL AVAILABLE CAPACITY IN MBPS (TO / FROM THE POP), AND II) TOTAL CAPACITY CURRENTLY USED BROKEN DOWN BY PEAK AND NON-PEAK USAGE PERIODS; AND

D) A MAP SHOWING YOUR OPERATING AREA WITH THE TYPES AND LOCATIONS OF POPS IN MAPINFO OR COMPATIBLE FORMAT.

A. Pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act, SaskTel is filing detailed network component location and provisioning related information in confidence with the Commission. The information in question is detailed information that is confidential and is treated consistently in a confidential manner by SaskTel. Release of this information on the public record would provide current and potential competitors with detailed knowledge of the use of SaskTel’s network by various carriers. This information would not normally be available to them and that would allow them to compete more effectively with SaskTel and that would prejudice the competitive position of the company, resulting in direct and material financial loss. An abridged version of the attachment has not been provided as it would be meaningless.

In regards to the responses to this question, SaskTel is defining unserved and underserved areas to be those areas where it provides internet service, excluding dial-up, which does not meet the Commission’s target speed of 5 Mbps download and 1 Mbps upload.

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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION a) SaskTel has a total of # POPs in underserved or unserved areas within the province.

b) The vast majority of POPs in SaskTel’s network are connected to the main SaskTel internet infrastructure utilizing Fibre backhaul. There are a very limited number of POPs that connect via licensed Microwave radio or copper-based DS1’s.

c) SaskTel has sufficient capacity to meet demand at each one of its POPs. The exact amount of capacity available and used would vary for every POP. An aggregated value for either of these measures is not available and would, in any case, be meaningless as the relevant capacity gap is that which exists at each individual POP. An average value would also not illustrate individual areas of concern. In any case, SaskTel does not provision its network in this manner which is why the information is not available. Rather, for the SaskTel IP Core and Regional Ethernet Transport, Subject Matter Experts review weekly reports on all links and cross sections augmenting capacity when reaching the threshold utilization of # and some cases having to augment prior to reaching the threshold trigger due to provisioning time frames.

d) Please see SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-10 NC 2015-134 ATTACHMENT 1.

# Filed in confidence with the CRTC
***End of Document***
#
#
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PAGE 1 OF 5
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. TO BETTER UNDERSTAND HISTORICAL AND PROJECTED NETWORK UTILIZATION AND DEMAND FOR BROADBAND INTERNET ACCESS SERVICES, PROVIDE RESPONSES TO THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS.

A) DESCRIBE THE VARIOUS ENGINEERING ASSUMPTIONS ASSOCIATED WITH NETWORK DEPLOYMENTS/UPGRADES, SUCH AS PERCENTAGE OF ACTIVE USERS (I.E. HOUSEHOLDS) AT PEAK PERIODS AND AT OTHER TIMES OF DAY, AS WELL AS THEIR PEAK USAGE DEMANDS. PROVIDE THE OVERSUBSCRIPTION RATIOS USED.

B) ARE DIFFERENT ENGINEERING ASSUMPTIONS UTILIZED WHEN PLANNING NETWORK DEPLOYMENTS/UPGRADES IN DIFFERENT GEOGRAPHIC AREAS, WHEN DIFFERENT TECHNOLOGIES ARE USED, OR WHERE DIFFERENT SPEED TIERS ARE OFFERED TO END USERS? IF YES, PLEASE EXPLAIN THESE DIFFERENCES.

C) FOR EACH OF THE YEARS 2010 TO 2014, PROVIDE 1) THE NETWORK ENGINEERING ASSUMPTION FOR THROUGHPUT BANDWIDTH ALLOCATED TO EACH END USER EXPRESSED IN KILOBITS PER SECOND (KBPS) (I.E. ENGINEERED THROUGHPUT), AND 2) THE AVERAGE VOLUME OF DATA USED PER END USER EXPRESSED IN GIGABYTES (GB) PER MONTH.

D) FOR EACH OF THE YEARS 2015 TO 2019, PROVIDE THE FORECASTS FOR THE INFORMATION REQUESTED IN PART C) ABOVE.

A. Pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act, SaskTel is filing detailed network demand related information in confidence with the Commission. The information in question is detailed information that is confidential and is treated consistently in a confidential manner by SaskTel. Release of this information on the public record would provide current and potential competitors with detailed knowledge of SaskTel’s network design. This information would not normally be available to them and that would allow them to compete more effectively with SaskTel and that would prejudice the competitive position of the company, resulting in direct and material financial loss. An abridged version is been provided for the public record.

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PAGE 2 OF 5
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION a) For FTTP, the engineering assumption is that the Optical Line Terminal (OLT) is capable of serving up to 2048 customers, provisioned via a fibre drop and with GPON based service within a 15KM to 30KM radius dependent on equipment vintage. Unlike copper based xDSL or fixed wireless services, the speed delivered to the end customer is not distance dependent, rather it is dependent on the electronics deployed within the network and at the customer premise.

With respect to network management practices, SaskTel does not currently apply a **** Use Policy to its FTTP Internet services; subscribers are permitted to download/upload an unlimited amount of bandwidth each month.

The engineering assumption for SaskTel’s xDSL infrastructure is that a DSLAM shelf is provisioned to provide service for up to 192 customers. If required, additional DSLAM shelves can be added to the cabinets as customer demand increases in a given community. xDSL infrastructure is provisioned on an asymmetrical basis, with higher portions of the available bandwidth dedicated to download as opposed to upload. The speed available to the end customer is dependent on the length of the customers copper loop between their home and the DSLAM unit itself. With respect to network management practices, SaskTel does not currently apply a **** Use Policy to its DSL Internet services;

subscribers are permitted to download/upload an unlimited amount of bandwidth each month. Should network congestion become an issue for residential households in the proposed communities to serve, SaskTel will consider increasing capacity, DSLAM shelves, etc. at various components in the network to meet customer demand.

The engineering assumptions for SaskTel’s High **** Fusion wireless internet solution see each tower provisioned with up to three LTE-TDD sectors. With 20 MHz of bandwidth, each sector is capable of providing service to approximately FILED IN CONFIDENCE WITH THE CRTC

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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 65-90 customers dependent upon customer usage, distribution and received signal strength. LTE-TDD technology differs from mobile wireless LTE in that it utilizes one frequency of spectrum where transmit and receive channels take turns on the same frequency band. This allows asymmetric traffic assignment allowing for more bandwidth allocation to the download speed of the customer.

In the case of SaskTel’s deployment, SaskTel has chosen a ratio that provides 5 Mbps in the downlink direction and 1 Mbps in the uplink direction. Customers’ speeds are limited to 2 Mbps download and 256 Kbps upload after they reach their 50 GB monthly cap. Existing Fusion customers are currently using approximately 45 GB per month on average.

b) The engineering assumptions and service mix offered remain the same for FTTP deployments regardless of the geographic area in which the technology is deployed. SaskTel notes that the decision to extend a FTTP deployment is made on an economic basis as any deployment of FTTP in brownfield or greenfield areas is capital intensive due to the required installation of not only equipment, but new fibre feeder and distribution, GPON splitters and the placement of a fibre drop to each customer.

For xDSL solutions, engineering assumptions are based upon the customer loop length from the DSLAM cabinet. Different speed options are available dependent on the vintage of DSLAM provisioned (i.e. ADSL, VDSL or VDSL2) and the overall loop lengths of the customers served by the DSLAM unit itself.

For SaskTel’s High **** Fusion wireless Internet solution, all towers are provisioned in the same manner regardless of geographic location. While today only one speed option is offered as continued development occurs, LTE-TDD technology is envisioned to offer additional download/upload speeds and FILED IN CONFIDENCE WITH THE CRTC

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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION automatic adjustment of the upload to download ratios. Annual software and hardware upgrades typically increase the efficiencies and capacities of existing networks and the migration to LTE Advanced technology may allow for carrier aggregation in the future.

c) SaskTel notes the company does not apply any usage-based billing to either its wholesale or its retail services and does not collect the detailed usage records that would be required to do so. As such, it is unable to provide a response to the Commission regarding the average throughput bandwidth provided to each customer. That said, SaskTel has collected monthly outgoing internet traffic peaks leaving the SaskTel network and incoming internet traffic entering the SaskTel network since 2000. **** devices attached to SaskTel’s interconnected peering and transit interfaces collect the traffic peak statistic of the interface, and not individual user peak traffic for each internet service speed.

These probes do not include traffic that stays on the SaskTel network. Using a simple calculation of the annual traffic peak divided by total internet subscribers it is able to provide the following data:

Year
Assumption for throughput
bandwidth to each end user
(Kbps)
2010 #
2011 #
2012 #
2013 #
2014 #
# Filed in confidence with the CRTC
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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION d) i) As noted above SaskTel does not have the data required to provide a response to part ii). However, it is able to provide the following assumed growth in throughput bandwidth to each end user utilizing similar simple calculations of the assumed annual traffic peak divided by total internet subscribers.

Year
Assumption for throughput
bandwidth to each end user
(Kbps)
2015 #
2016 #
2017 #
2018 #
2019 #
# Filed in confidence with the CRTC
***End of Document***
150714_SaskTel_Cvr_Ltr_NC15-134
SaskTel_CRTC_1
SaskTel_CRTC_10_ABR
SaskTel_CRTC_11_ABR
SaskTel_CRTC_9

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2395735 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - (PDF) 150714_SaskTel_Responses_RFIs_NC15-134_ABR.pdf
**** Hersche
Senior Director -
Regulatory Affairs
2121 Saskatchewan Drive
****, Saskatchewan
*** ***
Telephone: (306) 777-5346

Fax: (306) 565-6216 Electronic Fax: (306) 791-1457 Internet: ******@***.com

14 July 2015
via GCKey and e-mail
File No. 8663-C12-201503186
Mr. John Traversy
Secretary General
Canadian Radio-television and
Telecommunications Commission
Ottawa, ON *** ***
**** Mr. Traversy:

Re: Telecom Notice of Consultation CRTC 2015-134, Review of basic telecommunications services – Responses to Requests for Information 1. Pursuant to paragraph 44 of Telecom Notice of Consultation CRTC 2015-134, Review of basic telecommunications services, as amended by staff letter of 28 May, Saskatchewan Telecommunications (SaskTel) submits its responses to Requests for Information in the above noted proceeding.

2. Portions of the information provided in response to the interrogatories is provided in confidence in accordance with section 39 of the Telecommunications Act, section 32 of the Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission Rules of Practice and Procedure (CRTC Rules), Broadcasting and Telecom Information Bulletin CRTC 2010-961, and section 20 of the Access to Information Act.

3. This confidential information is commercially sensitive and is treated consistently in a confidential manner by SaskTel. Disclosure of the information provided could reasonably be expected to result in material financial loss and prejudice to the competitive position of SaskTel.

4. SaskTel submits portions of the following interrogatory responses in confidence with the Commission for the reason stated within the response.

SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-3 NC 2015-134
SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-4 NC 2015-134
SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-6 NC 2015-134
SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-7 NC 2015-134
SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-8 NC 2015-134
Mr. John Traversy
14 July 2015
**** 2 of 4
SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-9 NC 2015-134
SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-10 NC 2015-134
SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-11 NC 2015-134
Sincerely,
**** McKay
for **** Hersche
Senior Director - Regulatory Affairs
AM/nb
Attachments
cc: John Macri, CRTC, ******@***.com
**** Bailey, CRTC, ****.******@***.com

Distribution list as per CRTC letter of 28 May 2015 Mr. John Traversy

14 July 2015
**** 3 of 4
Distribution ****

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14 July 2015
**** 4 of 4

******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com,

******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ****.******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, broller-******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com,

******@***.com, ******@***.com,

******@***.com, ******@***.com, helene.pellerin@saint-lambert.ca, ******@***.com, ******@***.com, ******@***.com

***End of Document***
SASKTEL RESPONSE TO INTERROGATORY

14 JULY 2015 SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-1 NC 2015-134 PAGE 1 OF 4

INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. IDENTIFY THE NUMBER AND CORRESPONDING PERCENTAGE OF RESIDENTIAL CUSTOMERS SUBSCRIBING TO THE SERVICES LISTED BELOW AS OF DECEMBER 2014 BY EACH PROVINCE/TERRITORY WHERE THE COMPANY PROVIDES SERVICE:

A) THE LOWEST PRICED WIRELINE VOICE SERVICE; AND B) THE LOWEST PRICED POSTPAID MOBILE WIRELESS VOICE PLAN.

FOR EACH SERVICE, SPECIFY THE PERCENTAGE OF CUSTOMERS LOCATED IN I) HIGH COST SERVING AREAS (HCSAS) AND II) NON-HCSAS. PROVIDE A DESCRIPTION OF EACH SERVICE OFFERING (E.G. OPTIONAL SERVICES OR ENHANCED FEATURES; NUMBER OF LOCAL MINUTES FOR DAYTIME, EVENINGS, AND WEEKENDS; LONG DISTANCE MINUTES; NUMBER OF TEXT MESSAGES INCLUDED). SPECIFY 1) THE NON-DISCOUNTED PRICE FOR EACH SERVICE, 2) WHETHER THE PRICE IS AVAILABLE THROUGHOUT THE PROVINCE/TERRITORY PROVIDING THE REASONS FOR ANY DIFFERENCES, AND 3) ANY ADDITIONAL MONTHLY CHARGES THAT MAY APPLY.

A. a) In terms of residential wireline voice services, SaskTel provides service in its forborne and non-forborne exchanges in accordance with its General Tariff – Basic Services CRTC 21411 Item 110.12 – Network Access Service. The service includes individual local ****-Tone service with unlimited local calling within the customers’ exchange; access to low-speed internet at local rates;

access to the long distance network of the customers’ choice and to operator/directory services; and access to enhanced calling features, emergency services, message relay services and privacy and protection features. Also included is a listing in the local telephone book and one copy of the local telephone book per year.

The rate paid for wireline voice service varies based on the customer location within a rate band, as well as whether they are located inside or outside a base rate area.

SaskTel’s rate band structure is defined in General Tariff – Basic Services CRTC 21411 Item 100.12 – Rate Band Structure, and is provided below:

SASKTEL RESPONSE TO INTERROGATORY

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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Band Description Classification

A Downtown core areas of **** and
Saskatoon.
Non-HCSA

B Remaining areas of the **** and Saskatoon exchanges.

Non-HCSA

C Exchange areas of Estevan, Moose Jaw, **** Battleford, Prince ****, **** Current, Yorkton, and Weyburn.

Non-HCSA
D Not Applicable to SaskTel. N/A

E Wire Centres with less than 1500 total Network Access Service (NAS).

HCSA

F Wire Centres with greater than 1500 total lines and less than 8000 total lines and where the average loop length is greater than 4

kilometres.
HCSA

G Wire Centres located north of the agricultural area of Saskatchewan as defined in SaskTel’s General Tariff-Basic Services on Extra

Provisioning Charges.
HCSA

Base Rate Areas are defined in General Tariff – Basic Services CRTC 21411 Item 82 as follows:

Base Rate Area - The specific section or part of an Exchange Area within which Local Access Services are furnished at basic monthly rates and contains the designated Rate Centre for toll and other Interexchange Services. The Base Rate Area has a serving central office.

Island Base Rate (IBRA) - An area within an Exchange Area, remote from the Base Rate Area, within which Local Access Services are furnished. It is billed at a basic monthly rate that is dependent upon Rate Band criteria; however, it is not the designated Rate Centre and does not necessarily have a serving central office. An Island Base Rate has a stable population of 50 or more permanent SASKTEL RESPONSE TO INTERROGATORY

14 JULY 2015 SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-1 NC 2015-134 PAGE 3 OF 4

INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION households or businesses with telephone service in close proximity with each other.

Please refer to the following table for information regarding the price paid for local voice service by rate band.

SaskTel notes that 46% of its residential wireline customers subscribe to service in HCSAs, while the remaining 54% are in non-HCSAs.

b) SaskTel’s lowest priced postpaid wireless voice plan is the Talk 25 plan at $25.00/month. The plan includes 100 daytime local minutes and unlimited local evening and weekend calling. The rate for additional daytime minutes is $0.30/minute, and long distance minutes are rated at $0.45/min for calls placed within Canada to Canada & the United States, and $1.50/min for calls placed Rate Band BRA/IBRA type ****/month

($)
A N/A 21.54
B Inside 21.54
B Outside 24.87
C Inside 22.00
C Outside 25.83
C Inside – former Rotary Dial
customers in ****
Battleford
19.50
C Outside – former Rotary Dial
customers in ****
Battleford
23.33
E Inside/Outside 30.64
F Inside/Outside 30.64
G Inside/Outside 30.64
SASKTEL RESPONSE TO INTERROGATORY

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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION from the United States to Canada or the United States. The plan also includes Three-Way Calling, Call Transfer, Call Waiting and pay-per-use Text ($0.20/sent message) and Picture messaging ($0.75/sent message).

In terms of customer distribution for wireless customers, as the customers are mobile SaskTel is unable to determine with any high degree of certainty where the customer is located. However, based on telephone number assigned to the device, SaskTel notes that 49% of its wireless customers would be considered to subscribe to service in HCSAs, while the remaining 51% are in non-HCSAs.

***End of Document***
SASKTEL RESPONSE TO INTERROGATORY

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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. IDENTIFY THE LOWEST PRICED PREPAID WIRELESS VOICE PLAN OFFERED AS OF DECEMBER 2014 BY EACH PROVINCE/TERRITORY WHERE THE COMPANY PROVIDES SERVICE. PROVIDE A DESCRIPTION OF THE SERVICE OFFERING, AS WELL AS ANY ASSOCIATED CONDITIONS (E.G. PER CALL CONNECTION, ROLL OVER MINUTES, OTHER ASSOCIATED CHARGES). INDICATE THE PRICE PER MINUTE OF A LOCAL CALL. SPECIFY WHETHER 1) THE PLAN IS OFFERED THROUGHOUT THE PROVINCE/TERRITORY, AND 2) THERE ARE DIFFERENCES IN PRICING FOR THAT PLAN ACROSS THE PROVINCE/TERRITORY PROVIDING THE REASONS FOR ANY DIFFERENCES.

A. The lowest priced prepaid wireless voice plan that SaskTel offers is its Prepaid Pay Per Use plan. This plan has a minimum $8.00/month charge and includes $0.10/minute local calling, $0.25/minute long distance calling, and $0.20 per SMS sent charges. Also included in the service are Mini Mail voice mail, call waiting, call transfer and three-way calling. As per all SaskTel wireless plans, the service is available at the same price across the entire province where SaskTel has wireless service available.

***End of Document***
FILED IN CONFIDENCE WITH THE CRTC
SASKTEL RESPONSE TO INTERROGATORY

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PAGE 1 OF 2
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. IDENTIFY, FOR EACH PROVINCE/TERRITORY WHERE THE COMPANY PROVIDES SERVICE, THE NUMBER AND CORRESPONDING PERCENTAGE OF YOUR RESIDENTIAL CUSTOMERS AS OF DECEMBER 2014 WHO WERE SUBSCRIBING TO A BROADBAND INTERNET PLAN CLOSEST TO THE COMMISSION’S TARGET SPEEDS OF 5 MEGABITS PER SECOND (MBPS) DOWNLOAD AND 1 MBPS UPLOAD.

SPECIFY THE PERCENTAGE OF THESE CUSTOMERS LOCATED IN I) HCSAS AND II) NON-HCSAS. PROVIDE A DESCRIPTION OF THE BROADBAND INTERNET PLAN (E.G. SPEEDS, DATA CAPS, OVERAGE CHARGES). SPECIFY 1) THE NON-DISCOUNTED PRICE FOR THE SERVICE, AND 2) WHETHER THE PRICE IS AVAILABLE THROUGHOUT THE PROVINCE/TERRITORY PROVIDING THE REASONS FOR ANY DIFFERENCES.

A. SaskTel is filing portions of this response in confidence with the Commission in accordance with section 39 of the Telecommunications Act, section 32 of the Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission Rules of Practice and Procedure (CRTC Rules), Broadcasting and Telecom Information Bulletin CRTC 2010-961, and section 20 of the Access to Information Act. Detailed demand information is treated consistently in a confidential manner by SaskTel. Release of this information on the public record would provide current and potential competitors with detailed knowledge of the types of broadband access demanded by SaskTel’s customers. This information would not normally be available to them and that would allow them to compete more effectively with SaskTel and that would prejudice the competitive position of the company, resulting in direct and material financial loss.

SaskTel had a total of # or 67% of its residential broadband subscribers subscribed to one of its broadband internet plans which were closest to the Commission’s target speed of 5 Mbps download and 1 Mbps upload. Of these customers, 58% were located in non-HCSAs, while the remaining 42% were located in HCSAs.

# Filed in confidence with the CRTC
#
FILED IN CONFIDENCE WITH THE CRTC
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PAGE 2 OF 2
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Please refer to the following table regarding the broadband internet plans offered to customers which are closest to the Commission’s target speeds.

Service High ****
Plus
High ****
Basic
High ****
Fusion
HTS Satellite Internet
Availability 23 large
communities
288 smaller
communities
59 rural
towers
Within specific areas of
province within HTS
coverage area

Monthly Fee $49.95 $49.95 $79.95 $64.99 to $84.99 Upstream

(up to)
640 Kbps 640 Kbps 1 Mbps 1 Mbps
Downstream
(up to)
5 Mbps 5 Mbps 5 Mbps 5 Mbps
Monthly
Bandwidth

Unlimited Unlimited 50 GB 20 GB ($64.99) 30 GB ($74.95)

40 GB ($84.99)
Overage
Charges

N/A N/A N/A (Note 1) 20 GB – Soft cap (Note 2) 30 GB – Soft cap (Note 2)

40 GB - $5/GB

Note 1: Once a customer has reached the 50 GB monthly bandwidth cap, the customer’s speeds are reduced to 2 Mbps download and 256 Kbps upload for the remainder of their billing period, at which time full speed is restored.

Note 2: Once a customer has reached their monthly bandwidth cap, the customer’s speeds are reduced to 300 Kbps download and 100 Kbps upload for the remainder of their billing period, at which time full speed is restored.

SaskTel notes that the differences in rates between the above noted plans are based on the technology utilized to deliver the service. The DSL-based services are priced the same, while the High **** Fusion (based on LTE-TDD technology) and HTS Satellite Internet (based on HTS satellite technology) services are priced higher due to the additional cost incurred by the company to provision these services over their respective technologies.

***End of Document***
FILED IN CONFIDENCE WITH THE CRTC
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PAGE 1 OF 3
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. IDENTIFY THE FIVE MOST POPULAR FEATURES (E.G. VOICEMAIL, CALL DISPLAY, EXTRA USAGE PLAN, EMAIL ACCOUNT) CHOSEN BY YOUR RESIDENTIAL CUSTOMERS FOR MOBILE WIRELESS SERVICES. PROVIDE A DESCRIPTION OF THOSE FEATURES (INCLUDING THE NON-DISCOUNTED PRICE) AND THE CORRESPONDING NUMBER AND PERCENTAGE OF CUSTOMERS SUBSCRIBING TO THEM. IN ADDITION, SPECIFY THE NUMBER AND PERCENTAGE OF THESE CUSTOMERS LOCATED IN I) HCSAS AND II) NON-HCSAS FOR EACH PROVINCE/TERRITORY WHERE THE COMPANY PROVIDES MOBILE WIRELESS SERVICE.

A. Pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act, SaskTel is filing demand related information in confidence with the Commission. The information in question is detailed information that is confidential and is treated consistently in a confidential manner by SaskTel. Release of this information on the public record would provide current and potential competitors with detailed knowledge of the use of SaskTel’s network by various carriers. This information would not normally be available to them and that would allow them to compete more effectively with SaskTel and that would prejudice the competitive position of the company, resulting in direct and material financial loss. An abridged version has been provided.

The five most popular features for mobile wireless services are as follows:

1) Text Messaging (SMS) – unlimited SMS ($13.00/month stand-alone) This feature includes unlimited sent text messages. SaskTel does not charge for incoming text messaging. Unlimited SMS can be purchased as a stand-alone subscription to any voice plan, or is included in many SaskTel converged rate plans.

2) Call Display – incoming/outgoing call display ($8.00/month stand-alone for incoming, outgoing free)

Call display has two distinct parts:
FILED IN CONFIDENCE WITH THE CRTC
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PAGE 2 OF 3
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION i. Incoming Call Display – shows the number of an incoming cellular or landline call to a cellular phone.

ii. Outgoing Call Display – sends a cellular number to be displayed on other cellular or landline phones.

Customers can have incoming display, outgoing display or both. Call Display can be purchased as a stand-alone subscription to any voice plan, or is included in many SaskTel converged rate plans.

3) Unlimited Canada **** Distance add-on ($10.00/month) This feature provides unlimited calls from anywhere within Canada to anywhere in Canada or the U.S. (includes local and long distance airtime). It can be purchased as a stand-alone subscription.

4) Picture Messaging (MMS) ($0.75 per sent MMS) Picture/Video Messaging allows SaskTel customers – provided their wireless device is capable – to send and receive MMS (multimedia) messages (picture/video messages) with each other, as well as send and receive MMS (picture/video messages) with customers subscribed to other carriers.

Customers are charged per sent MMS unless they subscribe to a Wireless Data Service plan or Converged Wireless Rate Plan.

5) Voice Mail (Basic: $5.00/month, Enhanced: $10.00/month, Mini Mail:

$3.00/month)

The Voice Messaging Service answers calls when customers are away from their phone, already on their phone, too busy to answer their phone, or when their phone is turned off.

FILED IN CONFIDENCE WITH THE CRTC
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PAGE 3 OF 3
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Customers can retrieve messages from wherever they are, 24 hours a day, using a cellular or landline phone. Alternatively, customers can access their voice mailbox online from SaskTel.com for free.

Basic and Enhanced voice mail services allow for 25 messages to be stored, have a message duration of 3 minutes and archives messages for 14 days. Mini Mail voice mail service allows for 5 messages to be stored, have a message duration of 2 minutes and archives messages for 7 days.

Please refer to the following table for demand values for these services.

Service Number of
subscribers
non-HCSA
Number of
subscribers
HCSA
Total
Number of
subscribers
Percentage
of
subscribers
Text Messaging (SMS) # # # 64.4%
Call Display # # # 70.2%
Canada Unlimited LD # # # 11.7%
Picture Messaging
(MMS)
# # # 51.4%
Voice Mail # # # 36.7%
# Filed in confidence with the CRTC
***End of Document***
SASKTEL RESPONSE TO INTERROGATORY

14 JULY 2015 SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-5 NC 2015-134 PAGE 1 OF 2

INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. IDENTIFY THE NUMBER AND CORRESPONDING PERCENTAGE OF RESIDENTIAL CUSTOMERS SUBSCRIBING TO THE SERVICES LISTED BELOW AS OF DECEMBER 2014 FOR EACH PROVINCE/TERRITORY WHERE THE COMPANY PROVIDES SERVICE:

A) THE THREE MOST POPULAR WIRELINE VOICE PLANS; AND B) THE THREE MOST POPULAR WIRELINE INTERNET PLANS.

SPECIFY THE PERCENTAGE OF THESE CUSTOMERS LOCATED IN I) HCSAS AND II) NON-HCSAS. PROVIDE A DESCRIPTION OF EACH SERVICE OFFERING (E.G.

OPTIONAL SERVICES; NUMBER OF LOCAL MINUTES FOR DAYTIME, EVENINGS, AND WEEKENDS; LONG DISTANCE MINUTES; SPEEDS, DATA CAPS, OVERAGE CHARGES). SPECIFY THE NON-DISCOUNTED PRICE FOR THE SERVICE AND ANY ADDITIONAL MONTHLY CHARGES THAT MAY APPLY.

A. a) SaskTel does not provide wireline voice plans, and is therefore unable to provide a response as requested. Rather, customers purchase network access service from SaskTel which includes individual local ****-Tone service with unlimited local calling within the customer’s exchange; access to low-speed internet at local rates; access to the long distance network of the customers’ choice and to operator/directory services; access to enhanced calling features, emergency services, message relay services and privacy and protection features. Also included is a listing in the local telephone book and one copy of the local telephone book per year.

Rates and demand numbers for basic local service are provided in SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-1 NC 2015-134. Customers wishing to add enhanced features or long distance packages to their basic service are able to do so with stand-alone features, a feature package or a long distance plan.

b) Please refer to the following table regarding the three most popular wireline internet plans:

SASKTEL RESPONSE TO INTERROGATORY

14 JULY 2015 SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-5 NC 2015-134 PAGE 2 OF 2

INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Plan Download

****
(Mbps)
Upload
****
(Kbps)
****
($)
% of
customers
in HCSA
(Note 1)
% of
customers in
non-HCSA
(Note 2)
High ****
Basic
1.5 or 5.0* 128 or
640*
49.95 21.3% 0.03%
High ****
Classic
1.5 384 39.95 0.63% 13.36%
High ****
Plus
5.0 640 49.95 8.88% 39.00%

Note 1: For the specific service out of total High **** customers Note 2: For the specific service out of total High **** customers * Customers in eligible communities receive 5.0 Mbps download/640 Kbps upload speeds

All High **** Internet plans listed above receive 10 SaskTel.net email addresses with 1 GB of storage each, 24/7 technical support, Unlimited Usage, and modem.

***End of Document***
FILED IN CONFIDENCE WITH THE CRTC
SASKTEL RESPONSE TO INTERROGATORY

14 JULY 2015 SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-6 NC 2015-134 ABRIDGED

PAGE 1 OF 2
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. PROVIDE THE MONTHLY AVERAGE USAGE OF DATA [IN GIGABYTES (GB)] FOR RESIDENTIAL CUSTOMERS FOR THE YEAR 2014 FOR I) WIRELINE INTERNET SERVICE, AND II) MOBILE WIRELESS INTERNET SERVICE.

A. Pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act, SaskTel is filing demand related information in confidence with the Commission. The information in question is detailed information that is confidential and is treated consistently in a confidential manner by SaskTel. Release of this information on the public record would provide current and potential competitors with detailed knowledge of the use of SaskTel’s network by various carriers. This information would not normally be available to them and that would allow them to compete more effectively with SaskTel and that would prejudice the competitive position of the company, resulting in direct and material financial loss. An abridged version has been provided.

i) SaskTel does not collect user statistics that would be used to determine the average usage of residential customers for customers that are provisioned over Fibre to the Premise (FTTP) or Digital Subscriber Line (DSL) technology. As such, it is unable to provide a response to the question posed for customers served by those technologies.

It does collect monthly usage per subscriber on its High **** Fusion fixed wireless service, and these totals are provided in the table below. Please note that SaskTel commercially launched its Fusion product in **** of 2014, therefore data is only available from that point forward.

FILED IN CONFIDENCE WITH THE CRTC
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PAGE 2 OF 2
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Month

Average customer
usage (GB)
Apr #
May #
Jun #
Jul #
Aug #
Sep #
Oct #
Nov #
Dec #

ii) On average, SaskTel wireless users consumed # GB of data each month in 2014. A detailed month by month breakdown for 2014 is not available.

# Filed in confidence with the CRTC
***End of Document***
#
FILED IN CONFIDENCE WITH THE CRTC
SASKTEL RESPONSE TO INTERROGATORY

14 JULY 2015 SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-7 NC 2015-134 ABRIDGED

PAGE 1 OF 8
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. FOR EACH CATEGORY OF TELECOMMUNICATIONS SERVICE (I.E. WIRELINE VOICE, MOBILE WIRELESS VOICE, WIRELINE INTERNET, MOBILE WIRELESS INTERNET, FIXED WIRELESS INTERNET AND SATELLITE INTERNET) PROVIDED BY YOUR COMPANY, IDENTIFY AND DESCRIBE WHAT SERVICE OFFERINGS (E.G. DISCOUNTED PLANS, SPECIAL PRICING) OR INITIATIVES (E.G. BILL MANAGEMENT TOOLS, TOLL DENIAL) ARE AVAILABLE TO ASSIST CERTAIN SEGMENTS OF THE POPULATION FOR WHICH ACCESS OR AFFORDABILITY MAY BE A CONCERN, SUCH AS SENIORS, LOW INCOME CANADIANS, PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES, AND STUDENTS. DESCRIBE ANY OTHER SIMILAR OFFERINGS OR INITIATIVES THAT ARE AVAILABLE TO OTHER SPECIFIC SEGMENTS OF THE POPULATION. PROVIDE FOR THE YEAR 2014, THE NUMBER AND PERCENTAGE OF CUSTOMERS WHO USED THESE OFFERINGS OR INITIATIVES.

A. Pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act, SaskTel is filing demand related information in confidence with the Commission. The information in question is detailed information that is confidential and is treated consistently in a confidential manner by SaskTel. Release of this information on the public record would provide current and potential competitors with detailed knowledge of the use of SaskTel’s network by various carriers. This information would not normally be available to them and that would allow them to compete more effectively with SaskTel and that would prejudice the competitive position of the company, resulting in direct and material financial loss. An abridged version has been provided.

SaskTel has a number of service offerings that are available to certain segments of the population for which access or affordability may affect their ability to procure telecommunications products and services.

Wireline Voice Service

Bad Debt Repayment Plan – General Tariff Basic Services 21411 - Item 170.10 The Bad Debt Repayment Plan (BDRPP) is a one-time offering to residential customers that assists them in paying back their outstanding bad debt(s) with SaskTel. Customers under BDRPP will receive access to SaskTel’s basic telephone service but they must FILED IN CONFIDENCE WITH THE CRTC

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PAGE 2 OF 8
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION subscribe to Residential **** Management Tools (total toll restriction) and agree to the repayment schedule and associated conditions under BDRPP. BDRPP will be activated at time of installation.

SaskTel currently has # customers or 0.005% of its residential customers on this plan.

Toll Restrictor - General Tariff Basic Services 21411 - Item 170.15 Toll Restrictor curbs a telephone user’s ability to make long distance calls, access 900/976 service, or access Directory Assistance (DA) and Directory Assistance Call Completion (DACC). Toll Restriction is provided within the software of SaskTel’s switches.

SaskTel currently has # customers or 6.4% of its residential customers on this plan.

Residential **** Management Tools - General Tariff Basic Services 21411 - Item 170.05 Residential **** Management Tools are services which enable residential customers to acquire basic telephone service while restricting access to the long distance (LD) network. The type of toll restriction determines what LD network services can be accessed.

The Installment **** Plan also enables the customer’s service connection charge for network access and terminal equipment to be paid over a period of up to six months.

SaskTel is unable to accurately provide the number of customers on these plans as they are not tracked and would require extensive manual effort to determine the number.

# Filed in confidence with the CRTC
#
#
FILED IN CONFIDENCE WITH THE CRTC
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PAGE 3 OF 8
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Wireless Voice Services

School Bus Safety Plan

SaskTel offers a cellular plan exclusively for cellular phones in vehicles that transport children to and from school and school-related events.

The plan is $15.00/month and includes 60 minutes of local calling with additional minutes being rates at $0.50/minute.

SaskTel currently has # customers on this plan.

Incoming and Outgoing Call Denial

SaskTel offers Call Denial service to customers wishing to restrict the calling patterns on their cellular devices. With Outgoing Call Denial, customers are only able to receive calls, while Incoming Call Denial only allows customers to place outgoing calls.

SaskTel currently has # customers on this plan.

Toll Denial (CDMA network only)

SaskTel offers Toll Denial service to its CDMA customers that allow them to only place local calls. The customer is still able to receive incoming long distance calls from other customers.

SaskTel currently has # customers on this plan.

Special Needs

SaskTel has undertaken many activities to ensure that persons with disabilities have equal and full access to telecommunications and/or programming products and services.

# Filed in confidence with the CRTC
#
#
#
FILED IN CONFIDENCE WITH THE CRTC
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PAGE 4 OF 8
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION SaskTel is adhering to the many requirements established by the Commission to reduce obstacles to the delivery and receipt of communication services to disabled people. At times, most often at the request of the Saskatchewan disabled community, SaskTel has adopted specific programs or services that exceed national goals.

Telecommunications

The following is a list of special needs telecommunications services that SaskTel provides to disabled persons in Saskatchewan. SaskTel notes that it does not readily track the number of customers who utilize its special needs services:

- SaskTel provides alternate format phone bill and bill inserts using either Braille large print, or diskettes, depending on the request of the end customer.

- Directory Assistance is provided to registered special needs customers at no charge. SaskTel also provides directory assistance call completion at no charge for these customers.

- Telewriters (TTY) allow for communication by typed messages over telephone lines. A Telewriter unit is provided to Registered Users (deaf or speech impaired) at no charge. A second Telewriter can be requested for a Principal Contact, also provided at no charge.

- Telephone Ring Signaller is available at no charge to Registered TTY User.

- SaskTel Relay Service (SRS) assists TTY and IP Relay users to place and receive telephone calls from other TTY/IP Relay users and non-TTY/IP Relay users 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

- Toll calls made through SaskTel’s Relay Service receive a 50% discount.

- Voice Carry Over (VCO) and Hearing Carry Over (HCO) allow TTY users to speak for themselves and use the TTY to read the response of the other party.

Hearing Carry Over TTY users can listen to the other party and use the TTY to type their message. There are no additional charges for VCO and HCO options and no special equipment is required, just a standard TTY.

- TTY Directory Designation is an option for disabled persons where they can have the code TTY displayed following their listed name in the DirectWest directory to FILED IN CONFIDENCE WITH THE CRTC

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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION allow readers to recognize that the customer listed has a Telewriter. There is no charge for this service.

- Voicemail to Text service converts voice mails into text. The converted messages are then delivered as an email or as a text message to the customers’ cell phone. The service is available as pay-per-use or through various service plans.

- Online Voice Mail service allows customers with vision or mobility disabilities to fully administer their voice mail service via the internet and a personal computer or web-enabled device, rather than using a telephone set. The service allows the customer to listen to and manage their messages, change greetings, and to set up new message notifications to be sent to email or text message, in addition to all other administrative options via a secure website. There is no charge for this service.

- In conjunction with the Canadian Paraplegic Association, SaskTel provides a special cellular rate plan for its members. It includes free network access and 100 free minutes a month, Three-Way Calling, Call Transfer and Call Waiting. All other options and additional minutes are chargeable to the user.

- Artificial Larynx Machines are devices that make speech possible for individuals with speech impairments. SaskTel will provide one Artificial Larynx Machine to customers with a speech disability at no charge.

- Telephone Ring Signaller and ringer amplifiers are available.

- Stand-alone ringers for single-line sets and amplified photo telephones are available.

- **** call is available at no charge. (Approved users) - Big button phones are available.

- Teletrainers (telephone simulators) are provided free of charge to people and organizations that request them. These units include instructional videos, pamphlets, and booklets and are used mainly through schools for Special Education classes and with young children to teach them how to properly use the telephone.

In Saskatchewan, payphones also have a number of features available that provide accessibility to deaf or hearing impaired subscribers:

FILED IN CONFIDENCE WITH THE CRTC
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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION - All payphones are hearing aid compatible.

- All payphones provide connectability and signal compatibility for customer-provided TTYs and Voice Carry Over (VCO) devices.

- All payphones allow connection to SaskTel Relay Service (local calls from payphones which use SRS are free of charge, and toll calls using SRS are made at reduced rates).

- Each Millennium payphone has a volume control button and some payphones have a built-in data jack which can be connected to a portable computer.

- The majority of Millennium payphones are equipped with a Keypad TTY solution, which allows deaf or hearing impaired customers to use the telephone keypad in a manner similar to cellular text messaging in order to place TTY calls. SaskTel is continuing to install the Keypad TTY solution, with the goal of having all Millennium payphones equipped, as to comply with the directives from the CRTC in Telecom Decision CRTC 2004-47, Access to pay telephone service.

- Where demand exists, payphones are permanently-equipped with TTYs. Such payphones are marked with the universal TTY symbol.

Broadcasting

SaskTel maxTV™ Service offers the following features and services to address the needs of persons with disabilities:

- An Interactive Program Guide is incorporated into the digital set top box. It allows customers to search current and future programming, and to develop customized channel line-ups by using the Favorites menu option. With this option, customers can more easily access programming that is tailored to their needs, such as Closed Captioning programming or Described Video channels.

- Described Video programming provides a narrative description of a television program’s key visual elements so that blind or visually impaired customers understand what is occurring on the screen. SaskTel currently passes through described video programming for local, over-the-air signals and nine specialty programming services, and is in compliance with the Commission’s determinations in regards to Described Video.

FILED IN CONFIDENCE WITH THE CRTC
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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION - Closed Captioning enables deaf and hearing impaired customers to read what is happening in programming. SaskTel passes through closed captioning provided by programming services and is increasingly offering closed captioning on maxTV™ Video on Demand.

- VoicePrint is a national reading service that provides programming of benefit to blind or visually impaired customers. It provides full-text reading of stories, information, news and features published by a variety of newspapers, magazines and periodicals.

Student Promotions

SaskTel offers a number of specific promotions aimed at the student market. These offers apply to part or full time Saskatchewan post-secondary students with a valid Student ID for the 2015/2016 academic year. SaskTel is unable to provide accurate take rates for these promotions given the constant turnover associated with providing services to the student population.

Internet

Eligible students receive infiNET High **** Mach I (100 Mbps down/20 Mbps up) for $30.00 per month (regular $99.95/month) or High **** Ultra (25 Mbps down/2 Mbps up) for $25.00 per month (regular $79.95/month).

Wireless

Students receive $20.00 per month off select premium cellular plans when they activate a new smartphone on a 2 year contract. These plans are shown below:

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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Ultimate

70
Students get it for
$50/mo.**
Regular $70/mo.
 Unlimited local minutes
 150 Canadian long
distance minutes
 10 GB of Canada-wide
data
 Unlimited text, picture and
video messaging
 Call Display and Mini
Voice Mail
Ultimate 13th
Man
Students get it for
$65/mo.**
Regular $85/mo.
 Unlimited local minutes
 Unlimited long distance
minutes
 13 GB of Canada-wide
data
 Unlimited text, picture and
video messaging
 Call Display and
Enhanced Voice Mail
Ultimate 100
Students get it for
$80/mo.**
Regular $100/mo.
 Unlimited local minutes
 Unlimited long distance
minutes
 Unlimited Canada-wide
data
 Unlimited text, picture and
video messaging
 Call Display and Enhanced
Voice Mail
maxTV™ and Internet:

Students also are eligible to receive a promotion on basic maxTV entertainment services in conjunction with High **** Internet. For students in fibre-served areas they can package basic maxTV and infiNET Mach I for $60.00/month (regular $126.95), while those in DSL-served areas can package maxTV and High **** Plus (10 Mbps down/800 Kbps up) for $50.00/month (regular $76.95).

***End of Document***

http://www.sasktel.com/store/view-plan-by-type/browse/Personal/Wireless/Rate-plans/Voice-and-data-plans/_/N-270whttp://www.sasktel.com/store/view-plan-by-type/browse/Personal/Wireless/Rate-plans/Voice-and-data-plans/_/N-270whttp://www.sasktel.com/store/view-plan-by-type/browse/Personal/Wireless/Rate-plans/Voice-and-data-plans/_/N-270whttp://www.sasktel.com/store/view-plan-by-type/browse/Personal/Wireless/Rate-plans/Voice-and-data-plans/_/N-270whttp://www.sasktel.com/store/view-plan-by-type/browse/Personal/Wireless/Rate-plans/Voice-and-data-plans/_/N-270wFILED IN CONFIDENCE WITH THE CRTC

SASKTEL RESPONSE TO INTERROGATORY

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PAGE 1 OF 2
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. WITH RESPECT TO YOUR COMPANY’S OPERATING TERRITORY, PROVIDE THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION FOR INTERNET SERVICES (EXCLUDING DIAL-UP) THAT YOU OFFER:

A) THE TOTAL NUMBER OF HOUSEHOLDS THAT YOUR COMPANY IS CAPABLE OF SERVING;

B) THE TOTAL NUMBER OF HOUSEHOLDS SERVED BY YOUR COMPANY;

AND

C) THE TOTAL NUMBER OF HOUSEHOLDS SERVED THAT MEET THE COMMISSION’S BROADBAND INTERNET TARGET SPEEDS OF 5 MBPS DOWNLOAD / 1 MBPS UPLOAD.

A. Pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act, SaskTel is filing demand related information in confidence with the Commission. The information in question is detailed information that is confidential and is treated consistently in a confidential manner by SaskTel. Release of this information on the public record would provide current and potential competitors with detailed knowledge of the use of SaskTel’s network by various carriers. This information would not normally be available to them and that would allow them to compete more effectively with SaskTel and that would prejudice the competitive position of the company, resulting in direct and material financial loss. An abridged version has been provided.

a) SaskTel does not directly track the number of households it is capable of serving.

However, utilizing 2011 census data it assumes it is capable of serving approximately 336,209 households within the province.

b) As of 31 May 2015, SaskTel currently serves # households with internet services excluding dial-up.

# Filed in confidence with the CRTC
#
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INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION c) As of 31 May 2015, SaskTel currently serves # customers with an internet service that meets or exceeds the Commission’s broadband internet target speeds of 5 Mbps download/1 Mbps upload. That said, SaskTel notes that it serves an additional # households with broadband internet service at speeds of 5 Mbps download/640 Kbps upload and an additional # households with broadband internet service at speeds of 10 Mbps download/800 Kbps upload. SaskTel notes that these speeds do meet or exceed the Commission's targets with respect to download speeds, which is what SaskTel's customers are concerned with. The customer experience gained with increasing upload speeds from 640 Kbps or 800 Kbps to 1 Mbps would be negligible and come at an uneconomic cost.

# Filed in confidence with the CRTC
***End of Document***
#
#
#
SASKTEL RESPONSE TO INTERROGATORY

14 JULY 2015 SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-9 NC 2015-134 PAGE 1 OF 2

INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. WITH RESPECT TO YOUR COMPANY’S OPERATING TERRITORY, PROVIDE THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION FOR AREAS THAT ARE CURRENTLY UNSERVED OR UNDERSERVED AS OF DECEMBER 2014:

A) THE TECHNOLOGIES USED IN THE ACCESS FACILITIES FOR SERVING SUBSCRIBERS (OR HOUSEHOLDS), SUCH AS FIXED WIRELESS ACCESS (LICENSED OR UNLICENSED), SATELLITE (DIRECT TO HOME), CABLE MODEM, DIGITAL SUBSCRIBER LINE (DSL), FIBRE-OPTICS AND MOBILE WIRELESS;

B) FOR EACH TECHNOLOGY IN (A) ABOVE, THE AVERAGE UPSTREAM AND DOWNSTREAM INTERNET SPEEDS THAT YOU OFFER;

C) THE TECHNOLOGIES USED FOR CONNECTING TO THE POP AND AVERAGE CAPACITIES IN MBPS TO / FROM THE POP); AND D) A MAP SHOWING YOUR OPERATING TERRITORY WITH THE TYPES AND LOCATIONS OF ACCESS FACILITIES IN MAPINFO OR COMPATIBLE FORMAT.

A. In regards to the responses to this question, SaskTel is defining unserved and underserved areas to be those areas where it provides internet service, excluding dial-up, which does not meet the Commission’s target speed of 5 Mbps download and 1 Mbps upload. In unserved areas, SaskTel provides no service.

a) SaskTel provides broadband internet service to unserved and underserved areas utilizing wireline xDSL and licensed fixed wireless LTE-TDD technology operating at 2500 MHz. SaskTel does provide mobile wireless coverage in these areas, however, it does not market these services as a broadband internet service.

b) xDSL technology is provisioned to provide speeds of up to 5 Mbps download/640 Kbps upload as well as 10 Mbps download/800 Kbps upload in these areas. In very minimal areas, the service is provided at 1.5 Mbps download/128 Kbps upload. This is dependent upon the length of the customer’s service drop from the DSLAM unit, the speed profile for the community SaskTel has provisioned, and the package chosen by the customer. Fixed wireless over LTE-TDD is SASKTEL RESPONSE TO INTERROGATORY

14 JULY 2015 SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-9 NC 2015-134 PAGE 2 OF 2

INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION provisioned to provide speeds of up to 5 Mbps download/1 Mbps upload to end customers.

c) The vast majority of POPs in SaskTel’s network are connected to the main SaskTel internet infrastructure utilizing Fibre backhaul. There are a very limited number of POPs that connect via licensed Microwave radio or copper based DS1’s.

d) Please see SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-9 NC 2015-134 ATTACHMENT 1.

***End of Document***
FILED IN CONFIDENCE WITH THE CRTC
SASKTEL RESPONSE TO INTERROGATORY

14 JULY 2015 SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-10 NC 2015-134 ABRIDGED

PAGE 1 OF 2
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. WITH RESPECT TO YOUR COMPANY’S OPERATING TERRITORY, PROVIDE THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION IN AREAS THAT ARE CURRENTLY UNSERVED OR UNDERSERVED AS OF DECEMBER 2014:

A) THE TOTAL NUMBER OF POPS;

B) THE TECHNOLOGIES USED FOR BACKHAUL TO / FROM EACH POP;

C) FOR EACH TECHNOLOGY PROVIDED IN RESPONSE TO B. ABOVE, I) TOTAL AVAILABLE CAPACITY IN MBPS (TO / FROM THE POP), AND II) TOTAL CAPACITY CURRENTLY USED BROKEN DOWN BY PEAK AND NON-PEAK USAGE PERIODS; AND

D) A MAP SHOWING YOUR OPERATING AREA WITH THE TYPES AND LOCATIONS OF POPS IN MAPINFO OR COMPATIBLE FORMAT.

A. Pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act, SaskTel is filing detailed network component location and provisioning related information in confidence with the Commission. The information in question is detailed information that is confidential and is treated consistently in a confidential manner by SaskTel. Release of this information on the public record would provide current and potential competitors with detailed knowledge of the use of SaskTel’s network by various carriers. This information would not normally be available to them and that would allow them to compete more effectively with SaskTel and that would prejudice the competitive position of the company, resulting in direct and material financial loss. An abridged version of the attachment has not been provided as it would be meaningless.

In regards to the responses to this question, SaskTel is defining unserved and underserved areas to be those areas where it provides internet service, excluding dial-up, which does not meet the Commission’s target speed of 5 Mbps download and 1 Mbps upload.

FILED IN CONFIDENCE WITH THE CRTC
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PAGE 2 OF 2
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION a) SaskTel has a total of # POPs in underserved or unserved areas within the province.

b) The vast majority of POPs in SaskTel’s network are connected to the main SaskTel internet infrastructure utilizing Fibre backhaul. There are a very limited number of POPs that connect via licensed Microwave radio or copper-based DS1’s.

c) SaskTel has sufficient capacity to meet demand at each one of its POPs. The exact amount of capacity available and used would vary for every POP. An aggregated value for either of these measures is not available and would, in any case, be meaningless as the relevant capacity gap is that which exists at each individual POP. An average value would also not illustrate individual areas of concern. In any case, SaskTel does not provision its network in this manner which is why the information is not available. Rather, for the SaskTel IP Core and Regional Ethernet Transport, Subject Matter Experts review weekly reports on all links and cross sections augmenting capacity when reaching the threshold utilization of # and some cases having to augment prior to reaching the threshold trigger due to provisioning time frames.

d) Please see SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-10 NC 2015-134 ATTACHMENT 1.

# Filed in confidence with the CRTC
***End of Document***
#
#
FILED IN CONFIDENCE WITH THE CRTC
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PAGE 1 OF 5
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. TO BETTER UNDERSTAND HISTORICAL AND PROJECTED NETWORK UTILIZATION AND DEMAND FOR BROADBAND INTERNET ACCESS SERVICES, PROVIDE RESPONSES TO THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS.

A) DESCRIBE THE VARIOUS ENGINEERING ASSUMPTIONS ASSOCIATED WITH NETWORK DEPLOYMENTS/UPGRADES, SUCH AS PERCENTAGE OF ACTIVE USERS (I.E. HOUSEHOLDS) AT PEAK PERIODS AND AT OTHER TIMES OF DAY, AS WELL AS THEIR PEAK USAGE DEMANDS. PROVIDE THE OVERSUBSCRIPTION RATIOS USED.

B) ARE DIFFERENT ENGINEERING ASSUMPTIONS UTILIZED WHEN PLANNING NETWORK DEPLOYMENTS/UPGRADES IN DIFFERENT GEOGRAPHIC AREAS, WHEN DIFFERENT TECHNOLOGIES ARE USED, OR WHERE DIFFERENT SPEED TIERS ARE OFFERED TO END USERS? IF YES, PLEASE EXPLAIN THESE DIFFERENCES.

C) FOR EACH OF THE YEARS 2010 TO 2014, PROVIDE 1) THE NETWORK ENGINEERING ASSUMPTION FOR THROUGHPUT BANDWIDTH ALLOCATED TO EACH END USER EXPRESSED IN KILOBITS PER SECOND (KBPS) (I.E. ENGINEERED THROUGHPUT), AND 2) THE AVERAGE VOLUME OF DATA USED PER END USER EXPRESSED IN GIGABYTES (GB) PER MONTH.

D) FOR EACH OF THE YEARS 2015 TO 2019, PROVIDE THE FORECASTS FOR THE INFORMATION REQUESTED IN PART C) ABOVE.

A. Pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act, SaskTel is filing detailed network demand related information in confidence with the Commission. The information in question is detailed information that is confidential and is treated consistently in a confidential manner by SaskTel. Release of this information on the public record would provide current and potential competitors with detailed knowledge of SaskTel’s network design. This information would not normally be available to them and that would allow them to compete more effectively with SaskTel and that would prejudice the competitive position of the company, resulting in direct and material financial loss. An abridged version is been provided for the public record.

FILED IN CONFIDENCE WITH THE CRTC
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PAGE 2 OF 5
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION a) For FTTP, the engineering assumption is that the Optical Line Terminal (OLT) is capable of serving up to 2048 customers, provisioned via a fibre drop and with GPON based service within a 15KM to 30KM radius dependent on equipment vintage. Unlike copper based xDSL or fixed wireless services, the speed delivered to the end customer is not distance dependent, rather it is dependent on the electronics deployed within the network and at the customer premise.

With respect to network management practices, SaskTel does not currently apply a **** Use Policy to its FTTP Internet services; subscribers are permitted to download/upload an unlimited amount of bandwidth each month.

The engineering assumption for SaskTel’s xDSL infrastructure is that a DSLAM shelf is provisioned to provide service for up to 192 customers. If required, additional DSLAM shelves can be added to the cabinets as customer demand increases in a given community. xDSL infrastructure is provisioned on an asymmetrical basis, with higher portions of the available bandwidth dedicated to download as opposed to upload. The speed available to the end customer is dependent on the length of the customers copper loop between their home and the DSLAM unit itself. With respect to network management practices, SaskTel does not currently apply a **** Use Policy to its DSL Internet services;

subscribers are permitted to download/upload an unlimited amount of bandwidth each month. Should network congestion become an issue for residential households in the proposed communities to serve, SaskTel will consider increasing capacity, DSLAM shelves, etc. at various components in the network to meet customer demand.

The engineering assumptions for SaskTel’s High **** Fusion wireless internet solution see each tower provisioned with up to three LTE-TDD sectors. With 20 MHz of bandwidth, each sector is capable of providing service to approximately FILED IN CONFIDENCE WITH THE CRTC

SASKTEL RESPONSE TO INTERROGATORY

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PAGE 3 OF 5
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 65-90 customers dependent upon customer usage, distribution and received signal strength. LTE-TDD technology differs from mobile wireless LTE in that it utilizes one frequency of spectrum where transmit and receive channels take turns on the same frequency band. This allows asymmetric traffic assignment allowing for more bandwidth allocation to the download speed of the customer.

In the case of SaskTel’s deployment, SaskTel has chosen a ratio that provides 5 Mbps in the downlink direction and 1 Mbps in the uplink direction. Customers’ speeds are limited to 2 Mbps download and 256 Kbps upload after they reach their 50 GB monthly cap. Existing Fusion customers are currently using approximately 45 GB per month on average.

b) The engineering assumptions and service mix offered remain the same for FTTP deployments regardless of the geographic area in which the technology is deployed. SaskTel notes that the decision to extend a FTTP deployment is made on an economic basis as any deployment of FTTP in brownfield or greenfield areas is capital intensive due to the required installation of not only equipment, but new fibre feeder and distribution, GPON splitters and the placement of a fibre drop to each customer.

For xDSL solutions, engineering assumptions are based upon the customer loop length from the DSLAM cabinet. Different speed options are available dependent on the vintage of DSLAM provisioned (i.e. ADSL, VDSL or VDSL2) and the overall loop lengths of the customers served by the DSLAM unit itself.

For SaskTel’s High **** Fusion wireless Internet solution, all towers are provisioned in the same manner regardless of geographic location. While today only one speed option is offered as continued development occurs, LTE-TDD technology is envisioned to offer additional download/upload speeds and FILED IN CONFIDENCE WITH THE CRTC

SASKTEL RESPONSE TO INTERROGATORY

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PAGE 4 OF 5
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION automatic adjustment of the upload to download ratios. Annual software and hardware upgrades typically increase the efficiencies and capacities of existing networks and the migration to LTE Advanced technology may allow for carrier aggregation in the future.

c) SaskTel notes the company does not apply any usage-based billing to either its wholesale or its retail services and does not collect the detailed usage records that would be required to do so. As such, it is unable to provide a response to the Commission regarding the average throughput bandwidth provided to each customer. That said, SaskTel has collected monthly outgoing internet traffic peaks leaving the SaskTel network and incoming internet traffic entering the SaskTel network since 2000. **** devices attached to SaskTel’s interconnected peering and transit interfaces collect the traffic peak statistic of the interface, and not individual user peak traffic for each internet service speed.

These probes do not include traffic that stays on the SaskTel network. Using a simple calculation of the annual traffic peak divided by total internet subscribers it is able to provide the following data:

Year
Assumption for throughput
bandwidth to each end user
(Kbps)
2010 #
2011 #
2012 #
2013 #
2014 #
# Filed in confidence with the CRTC
FILED IN CONFIDENCE WITH THE CRTC
SASKTEL RESPONSE TO INTERROGATORY

14 JULY 2015 SASKTEL(CRTC)7MAY15-11 NC 2015-134 ABRIDGED

PAGE 5 OF 5
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION d) i) As noted above SaskTel does not have the data required to provide a response to part ii). However, it is able to provide the following assumed growth in throughput bandwidth to each end user utilizing similar simple calculations of the assumed annual traffic peak divided by total internet subscribers.

Year
Assumption for throughput
bandwidth to each end user
(Kbps)
2015 #
2016 #
2017 #
2018 #
2019 #
# Filed in confidence with the CRTC
***End of Document***
150714_SaskTel_Cvr_Ltr_NC15-134
SaskTel_CRTC_1
SaskTel_CRTC_10_ABR
SaskTel_CRTC_11_ABR
SaskTel_CRTC_9

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2394279 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - Festival Hydro Services Inc..pdf

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2394279 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - Festival Hydro Services Inc..pdf

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2394279 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - Festival Hydro Services Inc..pdf

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2394279 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - Festival Hydro Services Inc..pdf

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2395600 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - 150714-The Companies-CRTC-7May15-8 TNC 2015-134 Att_ABR.pdf

14 July 2015 The Companies(CRTC)7May15-8 TNC 2015-134Attachment

Abridged
**** 1 of 1
Part a) Part b) Part c)

Residence Customers Residence CustomersHHs Covered by Residence Customers Identified in Part b) Identified in Part b) Internet Network as at Dec 2014 Year-end Who Could be Served with Who Could be Served withFootprint (Note 1) 5/1 Mbps Actual 5 Mbps Download ActualBell Aliant Atlantic # # # #

Bell Aliant Central # # # #
Bell Canada # # # #
CVQ (Note 2) # # # #
DMTS # # # #
KMTS # # # #
NorthernTel # # # #
Northwestel # # # #
Ontera # # # #
Télébec (Note 3) # # # #
Total # # # #
Note 1:
Note 2:
Note 3:

# Filed in confidence with the CRTC.

CVQ response for a) reflects households (HHs) served by cable facilities footpint by either CVQ or Télébec.

Télébec response for a) reflects HHs served by DSL only facilities. Télébec cable footprint not included.

We have interpreted the measure requested (ie. Total number of households served) to mean customers.

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2395600 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - 150714-The Companies-CRTC-7May15-8 TNC 2015-134 Att_ABR.pdf

14 July 2015 The Companies(CRTC)7May15-8 TNC 2015-134Attachment

Abridged
**** 1 of 1
Part a) Part b) Part c)

Residence Customers Residence CustomersHHs Covered by Residence Customers Identified in Part b) Identified in Part b) Internet Network as at Dec 2014 Year-end Who Could be Served with Who Could be Served withFootprint (Note 1) 5/1 Mbps Actual 5 Mbps Download ActualBell Aliant Atlantic # # # #

Bell Aliant Central # # # #
Bell Canada # # # #
CVQ (Note 2) # # # #
DMTS # # # #
KMTS # # # #
NorthernTel # # # #
Northwestel # # # #
Ontera # # # #
Télébec (Note 3) # # # #
Total # # # #
Note 1:
Note 2:
Note 3:

# Filed in confidence with the CRTC.

CVQ response for a) reflects households (HHs) served by cable facilities footpint by either CVQ or Télébec.

Télébec response for a) reflects HHs served by DSL only facilities. Télébec cable footprint not included.

We have interpreted the measure requested (ie. Total number of households served) to mean customers.

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2395600 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - 150714-The Companies-CRTC-7May15-8 TNC 2015-134 Att_ABR.pdf

14 July 2015 The Companies(CRTC)7May15-8 TNC 2015-134Attachment

Abridged
**** 1 of 1
Part a) Part b) Part c)

Residence Customers Residence CustomersHHs Covered by Residence Customers Identified in Part b) Identified in Part b) Internet Network as at Dec 2014 Year-end Who Could be Served with Who Could be Served withFootprint (Note 1) 5/1 Mbps Actual 5 Mbps Download ActualBell Aliant Atlantic # # # #

Bell Aliant Central # # # #
Bell Canada # # # #
CVQ (Note 2) # # # #
DMTS # # # #
KMTS # # # #
NorthernTel # # # #
Northwestel # # # #
Ontera # # # #
Télébec (Note 3) # # # #
Total # # # #
Note 1:
Note 2:
Note 3:

# Filed in confidence with the CRTC.

CVQ response for a) reflects households (HHs) served by cable facilities footpint by either CVQ or Télébec.

Télébec response for a) reflects HHs served by DSL only facilities. Télébec cable footprint not included.

We have interpreted the measure requested (ie. Total number of households served) to mean customers.

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2395600 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - 150714-The Companies-CRTC-7May15-8 TNC 2015-134 Att_ABR.pdf

14 July 2015 The Companies(CRTC)7May15-8 TNC 2015-134Attachment

Abridged
**** 1 of 1
Part a) Part b) Part c)

Residence Customers Residence CustomersHHs Covered by Residence Customers Identified in Part b) Identified in Part b) Internet Network as at Dec 2014 Year-end Who Could be Served with Who Could be Served withFootprint (Note 1) 5/1 Mbps Actual 5 Mbps Download ActualBell Aliant Atlantic # # # #

Bell Aliant Central # # # #
Bell Canada # # # #
CVQ (Note 2) # # # #
DMTS # # # #
KMTS # # # #
NorthernTel # # # #
Northwestel # # # #
Ontera # # # #
Télébec (Note 3) # # # #
Total # # # #
Note 1:
Note 2:
Note 3:

# Filed in confidence with the CRTC.

CVQ response for a) reflects households (HHs) served by cable facilities footpint by either CVQ or Télébec.

Télébec response for a) reflects HHs served by DSL only facilities. Télébec cable footprint not included.

We have interpreted the measure requested (ie. Total number of households served) to mean customers.

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2384193 - 2015-134 - Response request for information - BC Broadband Association (BCBA) - Letter.pdf
248 **** St, ****, BC, *** ***
www.bcba.ca
**** 26, 2015
Mr. John Traversy
Secretary General
Canadian Radio-television and
Telecommunications Commission
Ottawa, ON, *** ***

Re: Telecom Notice of Consultation CRTC 2015-134 - Review of basic telecommunications services (File No. 8663-C12-201503186) - Response to Request for Information

**** Mr. Traversy:

1. The BC Broadband Association (“BCBA”) is in receipt of a letter from the Commission dated May 7, 2015, requesting for information relevant to examining the telecommunications services that Canadians require to participate meaningfully in the digital economy.

2. The BCBA is a group of telecommunications service providers, equipment suppliers and infrastructure constructors in Western Canada (see Attachment 1 for list of members). Our association does not run any networks of its own but many of our members do. We will try to speak to the type of networks they run.

3. Q#1. With respect to your organization’s telecommunications networks or facilities (built and/or owned) or telecommunications services offered, provide the following information:

4. A. The type of network that was built (e.g. fixed, mobile) along with the capacity to the various locations (e.g., schools, hotspots, end-users) and the technology used (e.g. fibre, cable, digital subscriber line, mobile, satellite, Wi-Fi);

5. Response: Our ISP members have built fixed wireless networks, fibre networks, satellite internet systems. They have also built supporting infrastructure to allow them to deploy wholesale ADSL/TPIA and fibre optic network elements. Capacity varies widely from 1Mbps – 10 Gbps.

6. B. The broadband service speeds available to subscribers, and the method used to determine that those speeds would meet subscribers’ needs;

7. Response: Our member’s package speeds vary widely depending on type of technology used to serve and the location of these services. In general urban providers offer speeds up to 25Mbps and rural providers up to 10Mbps.

8. C. The amount of investment and the funding mechanism(s) used 9. Response: Our members include small community networks and national providers. They use a variety of funding mechanisms including leasing, loans, capital investment from investors, earned profits and government grant programs.

10. D. The details of any partnership undertaken with other organizations for the network deployment;

248 **** St, ****, BC, *** ***
www.bcba.ca

11. Response: While our members often compete directly with each other in certain spaces, they do cooperate with each other for larger programs and deployment considerations.

During the recent Digital Canada 150 application process we actively worked together to ensure that grant applications did not overlap.

12. E. The reasons behind your decision to deploy a broadband network; and 13. Response: Our members typically have deployed networks where a need has arisen due to inadequate existing services or lack of competition.

14. F. Your approach to the use of the network by service providers (if applicable), including: i.

the company or companies that provide(s) retail service; and ii. a description of the method used to select the TSP (if there is a single service provider;

15. Response: As we do not operate our own network this is not a question we can answer.

16. Q#2. If retail services are available over your network, provide the following information:

17. A. The types of telecommunications service available (i.e. wireline voice, mobile wireless voice, wireline Internet and mobile wireless Internet) as well as the price for each service offering, and a description of the service characteristics included in each retail offering (e.g. speed, data usage, voice minutes);

18. Response: As stated previously our members pricing and packages vary widely based on type of technology used to connect and location the services are provided.

19. B. The three most popular retail offerings for each type of service identified in a) above;

and

20. Response: As we don’t directly offer any services to the public we cannot provide this information.

21. C. For each category of telecommunications service provided (i.e. wireline voice, mobile wireless voice, wireline Internet and mobile wireless Internet), a description of the service offerings (e.g. discounted plans, special pricing) or initiatives (e.g. bill management tools, toll denial) available to assist certain segments of the population for which access or affordability may be a concern (e.g. seniors, low income Canadians, people with disabilities, students).

22. Response: We are not aware of any specific programs available from our membership to lower income or disabilities.

23. Our association would like to thank the Commission in considering us to be part of this proceeding.

Sincerely yours,
Bob ****
President – BCBA
248 **** St, ****, BC, *** ***
www.bcba.ca
Attachment 1 – **** of BCBA Members
As of 22-June 2015
Name of Company City
1 a2b Fiber Vancouver, BC
2 ABC Communications ****, BC

3 Advanced Interactive Canada Inc. Burnaby, BC 4 AirSpeed Wireless Inc. **** Arm, BC

5 Alliance Business Solutions Inc Nanaimo, BC 6 Base Technology Ltd. Whistler, BC

7 BCNET Vancouver, BC

8 Beacon Wireless Inc Ganges, Saltspring Island, BC 9 Broadband Surfer Canada Inc. Spruce Grove, AB 10 Central Coast Communications Hagensborg, BC 11 China Creek Internet Services Ltd Princeton, BC 12 Citywest Cable and Telephone Prince ****, BC 13 Columbia Basin Trust Castlegar, BC,

14 Columbia Wireless Inc ****, BC,
15 D.S.G. Communications Ltd. ****, BC

16 Edgewood Community Internet Society Edgewood, BC 17 Go4objectives Ltd **** Vancouver, BC

18 GwaiiTel Masset, BC
19 ISpeed Communications Kelowna, BC
20 Kaslo Infonet Society Kaslo, BC,
21 KP Performance St. ****, Alberta

22 Lookieloo.net Sales & Purchases Ltd Chilliwack, BC 23 Lytton Area Wireless Society Lytton, BC 24 MBSI Canada Ltd Medicine Hat AB

25 MCSNet St. ****, AB
26 Minto Communications **** Bridge, BC

27 Narwhal-e Connect Corporation ****, BC 28 Netago ****, Alberta

29 Network Integrated Communications Ltd Chilliwack, BC 30 **** Island Communications Campbell River, BC 31 Peace Region Internet Society **** Creek, BC 32 Perfect World Innovations Inc. **** Vancouver, BC 33 QCIslands Net Ltd. Queen ****, BC

34 Qnet, Coquitlam Optical Network Corp. Coquitlam, BC 35 RBBS Telecom Inc Cranbrook, BC

36 Seaview Communications Ltd Tofino, BC
37 SIS Systems Ltd. Edmonton, AB
248 **** St, ****, BC, *** ***
www.bcba.ca

38 **** Solutions International Inc. ****, BC 39 Tercel Telecom Ltd ****, BC

40 **** Communications **** Lake, BC

41 Twin Island Communications Mansons Landing, BC 42 Uniserve Communications Co. Vancouver, BC 43 Waglisla Cablevision Ltd. Waglisla, BC 44 Xplornet Communications Inc. Markham, Ontario *** End of document ***

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2384193 - 2015-134 - Response request for information - BC Broadband Association (BCBA) - Letter.pdf
248 **** St, ****, BC, *** ***
www.bcba.ca
**** 26, 2015
Mr. John Traversy
Secretary General
Canadian Radio-television and
Telecommunications Commission
Ottawa, ON, *** ***

Re: Telecom Notice of Consultation CRTC 2015-134 - Review of basic telecommunications services (File No. 8663-C12-201503186) - Response to Request for Information

**** Mr. Traversy:

1. The BC Broadband Association (“BCBA”) is in receipt of a letter from the Commission dated May 7, 2015, requesting for information relevant to examining the telecommunications services that Canadians require to participate meaningfully in the digital economy.

2. The BCBA is a group of telecommunications service providers, equipment suppliers and infrastructure constructors in Western Canada (see Attachment 1 for list of members). Our association does not run any networks of its own but many of our members do. We will try to speak to the type of networks they run.

3. Q#1. With respect to your organization’s telecommunications networks or facilities (built and/or owned) or telecommunications services offered, provide the following information:

4. A. The type of network that was built (e.g. fixed, mobile) along with the capacity to the various locations (e.g., schools, hotspots, end-users) and the technology used (e.g. fibre, cable, digital subscriber line, mobile, satellite, Wi-Fi);

5. Response: Our ISP members have built fixed wireless networks, fibre networks, satellite internet systems. They have also built supporting infrastructure to allow them to deploy wholesale ADSL/TPIA and fibre optic network elements. Capacity varies widely from 1Mbps – 10 Gbps.

6. B. The broadband service speeds available to subscribers, and the method used to determine that those speeds would meet subscribers’ needs;

7. Response: Our member’s package speeds vary widely depending on type of technology used to serve and the location of these services. In general urban providers offer speeds up to 25Mbps and rural providers up to 10Mbps.

8. C. The amount of investment and the funding mechanism(s) used 9. Response: Our members include small community networks and national providers. They use a variety of funding mechanisms including leasing, loans, capital investment from investors, earned profits and government grant programs.

10. D. The details of any partnership undertaken with other organizations for the network deployment;

248 **** St, ****, BC, *** ***
www.bcba.ca

11. Response: While our members often compete directly with each other in certain spaces, they do cooperate with each other for larger programs and deployment considerations.

During the recent Digital Canada 150 application process we actively worked together to ensure that grant applications did not overlap.

12. E. The reasons behind your decision to deploy a broadband network; and 13. Response: Our members typically have deployed networks where a need has arisen due to inadequate existing services or lack of competition.

14. F. Your approach to the use of the network by service providers (if applicable), including: i.

the company or companies that provide(s) retail service; and ii. a description of the method used to select the TSP (if there is a single service provider;

15. Response: As we do not operate our own network this is not a question we can answer.

16. Q#2. If retail services are available over your network, provide the following information:

17. A. The types of telecommunications service available (i.e. wireline voice, mobile wireless voice, wireline Internet and mobile wireless Internet) as well as the price for each service offering, and a description of the service characteristics included in each retail offering (e.g. speed, data usage, voice minutes);

18. Response: As stated previously our members pricing and packages vary widely based on type of technology used to connect and location the services are provided.

19. B. The three most popular retail offerings for each type of service identified in a) above;

and

20. Response: As we don’t directly offer any services to the public we cannot provide this information.

21. C. For each category of telecommunications service provided (i.e. wireline voice, mobile wireless voice, wireline Internet and mobile wireless Internet), a description of the service offerings (e.g. discounted plans, special pricing) or initiatives (e.g. bill management tools, toll denial) available to assist certain segments of the population for which access or affordability may be a concern (e.g. seniors, low income Canadians, people with disabilities, students).

22. Response: We are not aware of any specific programs available from our membership to lower income or disabilities.

23. Our association would like to thank the Commission in considering us to be part of this proceeding.

Sincerely yours,
Bob ****
President – BCBA
248 **** St, ****, BC, *** ***
www.bcba.ca
Attachment 1 – **** of BCBA Members
As of 22-June 2015
Name of Company City
1 a2b Fiber Vancouver, BC
2 ABC Communications ****, BC

3 Advanced Interactive Canada Inc. Burnaby, BC 4 AirSpeed Wireless Inc. **** Arm, BC

5 Alliance Business Solutions Inc Nanaimo, BC 6 Base Technology Ltd. Whistler, BC

7 BCNET Vancouver, BC

8 Beacon Wireless Inc Ganges, Saltspring Island, BC 9 Broadband Surfer Canada Inc. Spruce Grove, AB 10 Central Coast Communications Hagensborg, BC 11 China Creek Internet Services Ltd Princeton, BC 12 Citywest Cable and Telephone Prince ****, BC 13 Columbia Basin Trust Castlegar, BC,

14 Columbia Wireless Inc ****, BC,
15 D.S.G. Communications Ltd. ****, BC

16 Edgewood Community Internet Society Edgewood, BC 17 Go4objectives Ltd **** Vancouver, BC

18 GwaiiTel Masset, BC
19 ISpeed Communications Kelowna, BC
20 Kaslo Infonet Society Kaslo, BC,
21 KP Performance St. ****, Alberta

22 Lookieloo.net Sales & Purchases Ltd Chilliwack, BC 23 Lytton Area Wireless Society Lytton, BC 24 MBSI Canada Ltd Medicine Hat AB

25 MCSNet St. ****, AB
26 Minto Communications **** Bridge, BC

27 Narwhal-e Connect Corporation ****, BC 28 Netago ****, Alberta

29 Network Integrated Communications Ltd Chilliwack, BC 30 **** Island Communications Campbell River, BC 31 Peace Region Internet Society **** Creek, BC 32 Perfect World Innovations Inc. **** Vancouver, BC 33 QCIslands Net Ltd. Queen ****, BC

34 Qnet, Coquitlam Optical Network Corp. Coquitlam, BC 35 RBBS Telecom Inc Cranbrook, BC

36 Seaview Communications Ltd Tofino, BC
37 SIS Systems Ltd. Edmonton, AB
248 **** St, ****, BC, *** ***
www.bcba.ca

38 **** Solutions International Inc. ****, BC 39 Tercel Telecom Ltd ****, BC

40 **** Communications **** Lake, BC

41 Twin Island Communications Mansons Landing, BC 42 Uniserve Communications Co. Vancouver, BC 43 Waglisla Cablevision Ltd. Waglisla, BC 44 Xplornet Communications Inc. Markham, Ontario *** End of document ***

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2384193 - 2015-134 - Response request for information - BC Broadband Association (BCBA) - Letter.pdf
248 **** St, ****, BC, *** ***
www.bcba.ca
**** 26, 2015
Mr. John Traversy
Secretary General
Canadian Radio-television and
Telecommunications Commission
Ottawa, ON, *** ***

Re: Telecom Notice of Consultation CRTC 2015-134 - Review of basic telecommunications services (File No. 8663-C12-201503186) - Response to Request for Information

**** Mr. Traversy:

1. The BC Broadband Association (“BCBA”) is in receipt of a letter from the Commission dated May 7, 2015, requesting for information relevant to examining the telecommunications services that Canadians require to participate meaningfully in the digital economy.

2. The BCBA is a group of telecommunications service providers, equipment suppliers and infrastructure constructors in Western Canada (see Attachment 1 for list of members). Our association does not run any networks of its own but many of our members do. We will try to speak to the type of networks they run.

3. Q#1. With respect to your organization’s telecommunications networks or facilities (built and/or owned) or telecommunications services offered, provide the following information:

4. A. The type of network that was built (e.g. fixed, mobile) along with the capacity to the various locations (e.g., schools, hotspots, end-users) and the technology used (e.g. fibre, cable, digital subscriber line, mobile, satellite, Wi-Fi);

5. Response: Our ISP members have built fixed wireless networks, fibre networks, satellite internet systems. They have also built supporting infrastructure to allow them to deploy wholesale ADSL/TPIA and fibre optic network elements. Capacity varies widely from 1Mbps – 10 Gbps.

6. B. The broadband service speeds available to subscribers, and the method used to determine that those speeds would meet subscribers’ needs;

7. Response: Our member’s package speeds vary widely depending on type of technology used to serve and the location of these services. In general urban providers offer speeds up to 25Mbps and rural providers up to 10Mbps.

8. C. The amount of investment and the funding mechanism(s) used 9. Response: Our members include small community networks and national providers. They use a variety of funding mechanisms including leasing, loans, capital investment from investors, earned profits and government grant programs.

10. D. The details of any partnership undertaken with other organizations for the network deployment;

248 **** St, ****, BC, *** ***
www.bcba.ca

11. Response: While our members often compete directly with each other in certain spaces, they do cooperate with each other for larger programs and deployment considerations.

During the recent Digital Canada 150 application process we actively worked together to ensure that grant applications did not overlap.

12. E. The reasons behind your decision to deploy a broadband network; and 13. Response: Our members typically have deployed networks where a need has arisen due to inadequate existing services or lack of competition.

14. F. Your approach to the use of the network by service providers (if applicable), including: i.

the company or companies that provide(s) retail service; and ii. a description of the method used to select the TSP (if there is a single service provider;

15. Response: As we do not operate our own network this is not a question we can answer.

16. Q#2. If retail services are available over your network, provide the following information:

17. A. The types of telecommunications service available (i.e. wireline voice, mobile wireless voice, wireline Internet and mobile wireless Internet) as well as the price for each service offering, and a description of the service characteristics included in each retail offering (e.g. speed, data usage, voice minutes);

18. Response: As stated previously our members pricing and packages vary widely based on type of technology used to connect and location the services are provided.

19. B. The three most popular retail offerings for each type of service identified in a) above;

and

20. Response: As we don’t directly offer any services to the public we cannot provide this information.

21. C. For each category of telecommunications service provided (i.e. wireline voice, mobile wireless voice, wireline Internet and mobile wireless Internet), a description of the service offerings (e.g. discounted plans, special pricing) or initiatives (e.g. bill management tools, toll denial) available to assist certain segments of the population for which access or affordability may be a concern (e.g. seniors, low income Canadians, people with disabilities, students).

22. Response: We are not aware of any specific programs available from our membership to lower income or disabilities.

23. Our association would like to thank the Commission in considering us to be part of this proceeding.

Sincerely yours,
Bob ****
President – BCBA
248 **** St, ****, BC, *** ***
www.bcba.ca
Attachment 1 – **** of BCBA Members
As of 22-June 2015
Name of Company City
1 a2b Fiber Vancouver, BC
2 ABC Communications ****, BC

3 Advanced Interactive Canada Inc. Burnaby, BC 4 AirSpeed Wireless Inc. **** Arm, BC

5 Alliance Business Solutions Inc Nanaimo, BC 6 Base Technology Ltd. Whistler, BC

7 BCNET Vancouver, BC

8 Beacon Wireless Inc Ganges, Saltspring Island, BC 9 Broadband Surfer Canada Inc. Spruce Grove, AB 10 Central Coast Communications Hagensborg, BC 11 China Creek Internet Services Ltd Princeton, BC 12 Citywest Cable and Telephone Prince ****, BC 13 Columbia Basin Trust Castlegar, BC,

14 Columbia Wireless Inc ****, BC,
15 D.S.G. Communications Ltd. ****, BC

16 Edgewood Community Internet Society Edgewood, BC 17 Go4objectives Ltd **** Vancouver, BC

18 GwaiiTel Masset, BC
19 ISpeed Communications Kelowna, BC
20 Kaslo Infonet Society Kaslo, BC,
21 KP Performance St. ****, Alberta

22 Lookieloo.net Sales & Purchases Ltd Chilliwack, BC 23 Lytton Area Wireless Society Lytton, BC 24 MBSI Canada Ltd Medicine Hat AB

25 MCSNet St. ****, AB
26 Minto Communications **** Bridge, BC

27 Narwhal-e Connect Corporation ****, BC 28 Netago ****, Alberta

29 Network Integrated Communications Ltd Chilliwack, BC 30 **** Island Communications Campbell River, BC 31 Peace Region Internet Society **** Creek, BC 32 Perfect World Innovations Inc. **** Vancouver, BC 33 QCIslands Net Ltd. Queen ****, BC

34 Qnet, Coquitlam Optical Network Corp. Coquitlam, BC 35 RBBS Telecom Inc Cranbrook, BC

36 Seaview Communications Ltd Tofino, BC
37 SIS Systems Ltd. Edmonton, AB
248 **** St, ****, BC, *** ***
www.bcba.ca

38 **** Solutions International Inc. ****, BC 39 Tercel Telecom Ltd ****, BC

40 **** Communications **** Lake, BC

41 Twin Island Communications Mansons Landing, BC 42 Uniserve Communications Co. Vancouver, BC 43 Waglisla Cablevision Ltd. Waglisla, BC 44 Xplornet Communications Inc. Markham, Ontario *** End of document ***

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2384193 - 2015-134 - Response request for information - BC Broadband Association (BCBA) - Letter.pdf
248 **** St, ****, BC, *** ***
www.bcba.ca
**** 26, 2015
Mr. John Traversy
Secretary General
Canadian Radio-television and
Telecommunications Commission
Ottawa, ON, *** ***

Re: Telecom Notice of Consultation CRTC 2015-134 - Review of basic telecommunications services (File No. 8663-C12-201503186) - Response to Request for Information

**** Mr. Traversy:

1. The BC Broadband Association (“BCBA”) is in receipt of a letter from the Commission dated May 7, 2015, requesting for information relevant to examining the telecommunications services that Canadians require to participate meaningfully in the digital economy.

2. The BCBA is a group of telecommunications service providers, equipment suppliers and infrastructure constructors in Western Canada (see Attachment 1 for list of members). Our association does not run any networks of its own but many of our members do. We will try to speak to the type of networks they run.

3. Q#1. With respect to your organization’s telecommunications networks or facilities (built and/or owned) or telecommunications services offered, provide the following information:

4. A. The type of network that was built (e.g. fixed, mobile) along with the capacity to the various locations (e.g., schools, hotspots, end-users) and the technology used (e.g. fibre, cable, digital subscriber line, mobile, satellite, Wi-Fi);

5. Response: Our ISP members have built fixed wireless networks, fibre networks, satellite internet systems. They have also built supporting infrastructure to allow them to deploy wholesale ADSL/TPIA and fibre optic network elements. Capacity varies widely from 1Mbps – 10 Gbps.

6. B. The broadband service speeds available to subscribers, and the method used to determine that those speeds would meet subscribers’ needs;

7. Response: Our member’s package speeds vary widely depending on type of technology used to serve and the location of these services. In general urban providers offer speeds up to 25Mbps and rural providers up to 10Mbps.

8. C. The amount of investment and the funding mechanism(s) used 9. Response: Our members include small community networks and national providers. They use a variety of funding mechanisms including leasing, loans, capital investment from investors, earned profits and government grant programs.

10. D. The details of any partnership undertaken with other organizations for the network deployment;

248 **** St, ****, BC, *** ***
www.bcba.ca

11. Response: While our members often compete directly with each other in certain spaces, they do cooperate with each other for larger programs and deployment considerations.

During the recent Digital Canada 150 application process we actively worked together to ensure that grant applications did not overlap.

12. E. The reasons behind your decision to deploy a broadband network; and 13. Response: Our members typically have deployed networks where a need has arisen due to inadequate existing services or lack of competition.

14. F. Your approach to the use of the network by service providers (if applicable), including: i.

the company or companies that provide(s) retail service; and ii. a description of the method used to select the TSP (if there is a single service provider;

15. Response: As we do not operate our own network this is not a question we can answer.

16. Q#2. If retail services are available over your network, provide the following information:

17. A. The types of telecommunications service available (i.e. wireline voice, mobile wireless voice, wireline Internet and mobile wireless Internet) as well as the price for each service offering, and a description of the service characteristics included in each retail offering (e.g. speed, data usage, voice minutes);

18. Response: As stated previously our members pricing and packages vary widely based on type of technology used to connect and location the services are provided.

19. B. The three most popular retail offerings for each type of service identified in a) above;

and

20. Response: As we don’t directly offer any services to the public we cannot provide this information.

21. C. For each category of telecommunications service provided (i.e. wireline voice, mobile wireless voice, wireline Internet and mobile wireless Internet), a description of the service offerings (e.g. discounted plans, special pricing) or initiatives (e.g. bill management tools, toll denial) available to assist certain segments of the population for which access or affordability may be a concern (e.g. seniors, low income Canadians, people with disabilities, students).

22. Response: We are not aware of any specific programs available from our membership to lower income or disabilities.

23. Our association would like to thank the Commission in considering us to be part of this proceeding.

Sincerely yours,
Bob ****
President – BCBA
248 **** St, ****, BC, *** ***
www.bcba.ca
Attachment 1 – **** of BCBA Members
As of 22-June 2015
Name of Company City
1 a2b Fiber Vancouver, BC
2 ABC Communications ****, BC

3 Advanced Interactive Canada Inc. Burnaby, BC 4 AirSpeed Wireless Inc. **** Arm, BC

5 Alliance Business Solutions Inc Nanaimo, BC 6 Base Technology Ltd. Whistler, BC

7 BCNET Vancouver, BC

8 Beacon Wireless Inc Ganges, Saltspring Island, BC 9 Broadband Surfer Canada Inc. Spruce Grove, AB 10 Central Coast Communications Hagensborg, BC 11 China Creek Internet Services Ltd Princeton, BC 12 Citywest Cable and Telephone Prince ****, BC 13 Columbia Basin Trust Castlegar, BC,

14 Columbia Wireless Inc ****, BC,
15 D.S.G. Communications Ltd. ****, BC

16 Edgewood Community Internet Society Edgewood, BC 17 Go4objectives Ltd **** Vancouver, BC

18 GwaiiTel Masset, BC
19 ISpeed Communications Kelowna, BC
20 Kaslo Infonet Society Kaslo, BC,
21 KP Performance St. ****, Alberta

22 Lookieloo.net Sales & Purchases Ltd Chilliwack, BC 23 Lytton Area Wireless Society Lytton, BC 24 MBSI Canada Ltd Medicine Hat AB

25 MCSNet St. ****, AB
26 Minto Communications **** Bridge, BC

27 Narwhal-e Connect Corporation ****, BC 28 Netago ****, Alberta

29 Network Integrated Communications Ltd Chilliwack, BC 30 **** Island Communications Campbell River, BC 31 Peace Region Internet Society **** Creek, BC 32 Perfect World Innovations Inc. **** Vancouver, BC 33 QCIslands Net Ltd. Queen ****, BC

34 Qnet, Coquitlam Optical Network Corp. Coquitlam, BC 35 RBBS Telecom Inc Cranbrook, BC

36 Seaview Communications Ltd Tofino, BC
37 SIS Systems Ltd. Edmonton, AB
248 **** St, ****, BC, *** ***
www.bcba.ca

38 **** Solutions International Inc. ****, BC 39 Tercel Telecom Ltd ****, BC

40 **** Communications **** Lake, BC

41 Twin Island Communications Mansons Landing, BC 42 Uniserve Communications Co. Vancouver, BC 43 Waglisla Cablevision Ltd. Waglisla, BC 44 Xplornet Communications Inc. Markham, Ontario *** End of document ***

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2395427 - 2015-134 - Responses to request for information - DCL response to CRTC 07May15_10ABRIDGED.pdf

DISTRIBUTEL COMMUNICATIONS LIMITED Response to Interrogatory ABRIDGED

14 July 2015 DISTRIBUTEL (CRTC) 07May15-10 TNC 2015-134 **** 1 of 1

**** 1 of 2
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY
CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND
TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION

Q. With respect to your company’s operating territory, provide the following information in areas that are currently unserved or underserved as of December 2014:

1. the total number of PoPs;

2. the technologies used for backhaul to / from each PoP;

3. for each technology provided in response to b. above, i) total available capacity in Mbps (to / from the PoP), and ii) total capacity currently used broken down by peak and non-peak usage periods; and

4. a map showing your operating area with the types and locations of PoPs in MapInfo or compatible format.

A. Distributel’s response to this interrogatory is filed in confidence with the Commission pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act. Release of this information, which is consistently treated in a confidential manner by Distributel, would cause specific direct harm to Distributel by providing existing and potential competitors with invaluable competitively-sensitive information, thereby enabling them to develop business strategies to more effectively compete with Distributel. An abridged version is provided for the public record.

1. #
2. #
3. #
4. #
***END OF DOCUMENT***

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2395427 - 2015-134 - Responses to request for information - DCL response to CRTC 07May15_10ABRIDGED.pdf

DISTRIBUTEL COMMUNICATIONS LIMITED Response to Interrogatory ABRIDGED

14 July 2015 DISTRIBUTEL (CRTC) 07May15-10 TNC 2015-134 **** 1 of 1

**** 1 of 2
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY
CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND
TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION

Q. With respect to your company’s operating territory, provide the following information in areas that are currently unserved or underserved as of December 2014:

1. the total number of PoPs;

2. the technologies used for backhaul to / from each PoP;

3. for each technology provided in response to b. above, i) total available capacity in Mbps (to / from the PoP), and ii) total capacity currently used broken down by peak and non-peak usage periods; and

4. a map showing your operating area with the types and locations of PoPs in MapInfo or compatible format.

A. Distributel’s response to this interrogatory is filed in confidence with the Commission pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act. Release of this information, which is consistently treated in a confidential manner by Distributel, would cause specific direct harm to Distributel by providing existing and potential competitors with invaluable competitively-sensitive information, thereby enabling them to develop business strategies to more effectively compete with Distributel. An abridged version is provided for the public record.

1. #
2. #
3. #
4. #
***END OF DOCUMENT***

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2395427 - 2015-134 - Responses to request for information - DCL response to CRTC 07May15_10ABRIDGED.pdf

DISTRIBUTEL COMMUNICATIONS LIMITED Response to Interrogatory ABRIDGED

14 July 2015 DISTRIBUTEL (CRTC) 07May15-10 TNC 2015-134 **** 1 of 1

**** 1 of 2
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY
CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND
TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION

Q. With respect to your company’s operating territory, provide the following information in areas that are currently unserved or underserved as of December 2014:

1. the total number of PoPs;

2. the technologies used for backhaul to / from each PoP;

3. for each technology provided in response to b. above, i) total available capacity in Mbps (to / from the PoP), and ii) total capacity currently used broken down by peak and non-peak usage periods; and

4. a map showing your operating area with the types and locations of PoPs in MapInfo or compatible format.

A. Distributel’s response to this interrogatory is filed in confidence with the Commission pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act. Release of this information, which is consistently treated in a confidential manner by Distributel, would cause specific direct harm to Distributel by providing existing and potential competitors with invaluable competitively-sensitive information, thereby enabling them to develop business strategies to more effectively compete with Distributel. An abridged version is provided for the public record.

1. #
2. #
3. #
4. #
***END OF DOCUMENT***

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2395427 - 2015-134 - Responses to request for information - DCL response to CRTC 07May15_10ABRIDGED.pdf

DISTRIBUTEL COMMUNICATIONS LIMITED Response to Interrogatory ABRIDGED

14 July 2015 DISTRIBUTEL (CRTC) 07May15-10 TNC 2015-134 **** 1 of 1

**** 1 of 2
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY
CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND
TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION

Q. With respect to your company’s operating territory, provide the following information in areas that are currently unserved or underserved as of December 2014:

1. the total number of PoPs;

2. the technologies used for backhaul to / from each PoP;

3. for each technology provided in response to b. above, i) total available capacity in Mbps (to / from the PoP), and ii) total capacity currently used broken down by peak and non-peak usage periods; and

4. a map showing your operating area with the types and locations of PoPs in MapInfo or compatible format.

A. Distributel’s response to this interrogatory is filed in confidence with the Commission pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act. Release of this information, which is consistently treated in a confidential manner by Distributel, would cause specific direct harm to Distributel by providing existing and potential competitors with invaluable competitively-sensitive information, thereby enabling them to develop business strategies to more effectively compete with Distributel. An abridged version is provided for the public record.

1. #
2. #
3. #
4. #
***END OF DOCUMENT***

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2394915 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - Primus(CRTC)7May15-05 TNC 2015-134 Abridged.pdf

Primus Telecommunications Canada Inc. Response to Interrogatory 14 July 2015 Primus(CRTC)7May15-05 TNC 2015-134 Abridged

**** 1 of 2
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. Identify the number and corresponding percentage of residential customers subscribing to the services listed below as of December 2014 for each province/territory where the company provides service:

a) the three most popular wireline voice plans; and b) the three most popular wireline Internet plans.

Specify the percentage of these customers located in i) HCSAs and ii) non-HCSAs.

Provide a description of each service offering (e.g. optional services; number of local minutes for daytime, evenings, and weekends; long distance minutes; speeds, data caps, overage charges). Specify the non-discounted price for the service and any additional monthly charges that may apply.

A. Pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act, certain information in this response is provided in confidence to the Commission. Release of this information on the public record would provide existing and potential competitors with strategic information with regard to Primus’ business in a competitive market that would not otherwise be available to them. This information could be used by such parties to develop more effective marketing strategies and to focus on specific market segments which could cause Primus specific direct harm. An abridged version of this response is provided for the public record.

a) Primus’ three most popular wireline voice plans are # #

#

#. The number and percentage of Primus’ residential customers subscribing to these plans as of December 2014 in each province/territory the services are available as well as the percentage located in HCSAs and non-HCSAs are shown in the following chart:

# Filed with the Commission in confidence.

Province AB BC MB ON QC
# by
province
# # # # #
% by
province
# # # # #
% in
HCSA
# # # # #
% in
non-
HCSA
# # # # #

Primus(CRTC)7May15-05 TNC 2015-134 Abridged

**** 2 of 2

The monthly non-discounted price for these plans is as follows: # #

#
#

# See Primus(CRTC)7May15-01 TNC 2015-134 for description of the baseline terms and optional services and features applicable to all Primus plans.

b) Primus’ three most popular wireline Internet plans are as follows: # #

#

#. The number and percentage of residential customers subscribing to these plans as of December 2014 in each province/territory the services are available as well as the percentage of customers located in HCSAs and non-HCSAs are shown in the following chart:

The non-discounted monthly price for these plans is as follows: # #

#
#
#

Pricing is national where the services are available, with some customers on a lower or higher price point depending on the terms of their promotional package and/or the point in time they activated their service. No caps or usage charges apply to these Internet plans.

# Filed with the Commission in confidence.

***End of Document ***
Province AB BC MB NS ON QC
# by
province
# # # # # #
% by
province
# # # # # #
% in
HCSA
# # # # # #
% in
non-
HCSA
# # # # # #

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2394915 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - Primus(CRTC)7May15-05 TNC 2015-134 Abridged.pdf

Primus Telecommunications Canada Inc. Response to Interrogatory 14 July 2015 Primus(CRTC)7May15-05 TNC 2015-134 Abridged

**** 1 of 2
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. Identify the number and corresponding percentage of residential customers subscribing to the services listed below as of December 2014 for each province/territory where the company provides service:

a) the three most popular wireline voice plans; and b) the three most popular wireline Internet plans.

Specify the percentage of these customers located in i) HCSAs and ii) non-HCSAs.

Provide a description of each service offering (e.g. optional services; number of local minutes for daytime, evenings, and weekends; long distance minutes; speeds, data caps, overage charges). Specify the non-discounted price for the service and any additional monthly charges that may apply.

A. Pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act, certain information in this response is provided in confidence to the Commission. Release of this information on the public record would provide existing and potential competitors with strategic information with regard to Primus’ business in a competitive market that would not otherwise be available to them. This information could be used by such parties to develop more effective marketing strategies and to focus on specific market segments which could cause Primus specific direct harm. An abridged version of this response is provided for the public record.

a) Primus’ three most popular wireline voice plans are # #

#

#. The number and percentage of Primus’ residential customers subscribing to these plans as of December 2014 in each province/territory the services are available as well as the percentage located in HCSAs and non-HCSAs are shown in the following chart:

# Filed with the Commission in confidence.

Province AB BC MB ON QC
# by
province
# # # # #
% by
province
# # # # #
% in
HCSA
# # # # #
% in
non-
HCSA
# # # # #

Primus(CRTC)7May15-05 TNC 2015-134 Abridged

**** 2 of 2

The monthly non-discounted price for these plans is as follows: # #

#
#

# See Primus(CRTC)7May15-01 TNC 2015-134 for description of the baseline terms and optional services and features applicable to all Primus plans.

b) Primus’ three most popular wireline Internet plans are as follows: # #

#

#. The number and percentage of residential customers subscribing to these plans as of December 2014 in each province/territory the services are available as well as the percentage of customers located in HCSAs and non-HCSAs are shown in the following chart:

The non-discounted monthly price for these plans is as follows: # #

#
#
#

Pricing is national where the services are available, with some customers on a lower or higher price point depending on the terms of their promotional package and/or the point in time they activated their service. No caps or usage charges apply to these Internet plans.

# Filed with the Commission in confidence.

***End of Document ***
Province AB BC MB NS ON QC
# by
province
# # # # # #
% by
province
# # # # # #
% in
HCSA
# # # # # #
% in
non-
HCSA
# # # # # #

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2394915 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - Primus(CRTC)7May15-05 TNC 2015-134 Abridged.pdf

Primus Telecommunications Canada Inc. Response to Interrogatory 14 July 2015 Primus(CRTC)7May15-05 TNC 2015-134 Abridged

**** 1 of 2
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. Identify the number and corresponding percentage of residential customers subscribing to the services listed below as of December 2014 for each province/territory where the company provides service:

a) the three most popular wireline voice plans; and b) the three most popular wireline Internet plans.

Specify the percentage of these customers located in i) HCSAs and ii) non-HCSAs.

Provide a description of each service offering (e.g. optional services; number of local minutes for daytime, evenings, and weekends; long distance minutes; speeds, data caps, overage charges). Specify the non-discounted price for the service and any additional monthly charges that may apply.

A. Pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act, certain information in this response is provided in confidence to the Commission. Release of this information on the public record would provide existing and potential competitors with strategic information with regard to Primus’ business in a competitive market that would not otherwise be available to them. This information could be used by such parties to develop more effective marketing strategies and to focus on specific market segments which could cause Primus specific direct harm. An abridged version of this response is provided for the public record.

a) Primus’ three most popular wireline voice plans are # #

#

#. The number and percentage of Primus’ residential customers subscribing to these plans as of December 2014 in each province/territory the services are available as well as the percentage located in HCSAs and non-HCSAs are shown in the following chart:

# Filed with the Commission in confidence.

Province AB BC MB ON QC
# by
province
# # # # #
% by
province
# # # # #
% in
HCSA
# # # # #
% in
non-
HCSA
# # # # #

Primus(CRTC)7May15-05 TNC 2015-134 Abridged

**** 2 of 2

The monthly non-discounted price for these plans is as follows: # #

#
#

# See Primus(CRTC)7May15-01 TNC 2015-134 for description of the baseline terms and optional services and features applicable to all Primus plans.

b) Primus’ three most popular wireline Internet plans are as follows: # #

#

#. The number and percentage of residential customers subscribing to these plans as of December 2014 in each province/territory the services are available as well as the percentage of customers located in HCSAs and non-HCSAs are shown in the following chart:

The non-discounted monthly price for these plans is as follows: # #

#
#
#

Pricing is national where the services are available, with some customers on a lower or higher price point depending on the terms of their promotional package and/or the point in time they activated their service. No caps or usage charges apply to these Internet plans.

# Filed with the Commission in confidence.

***End of Document ***
Province AB BC MB NS ON QC
# by
province
# # # # # #
% by
province
# # # # # #
% in
HCSA
# # # # # #
% in
non-
HCSA
# # # # # #

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2394915 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - Primus(CRTC)7May15-05 TNC 2015-134 Abridged.pdf

Primus Telecommunications Canada Inc. Response to Interrogatory 14 July 2015 Primus(CRTC)7May15-05 TNC 2015-134 Abridged

**** 1 of 2
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. Identify the number and corresponding percentage of residential customers subscribing to the services listed below as of December 2014 for each province/territory where the company provides service:

a) the three most popular wireline voice plans; and b) the three most popular wireline Internet plans.

Specify the percentage of these customers located in i) HCSAs and ii) non-HCSAs.

Provide a description of each service offering (e.g. optional services; number of local minutes for daytime, evenings, and weekends; long distance minutes; speeds, data caps, overage charges). Specify the non-discounted price for the service and any additional monthly charges that may apply.

A. Pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act, certain information in this response is provided in confidence to the Commission. Release of this information on the public record would provide existing and potential competitors with strategic information with regard to Primus’ business in a competitive market that would not otherwise be available to them. This information could be used by such parties to develop more effective marketing strategies and to focus on specific market segments which could cause Primus specific direct harm. An abridged version of this response is provided for the public record.

a) Primus’ three most popular wireline voice plans are # #

#

#. The number and percentage of Primus’ residential customers subscribing to these plans as of December 2014 in each province/territory the services are available as well as the percentage located in HCSAs and non-HCSAs are shown in the following chart:

# Filed with the Commission in confidence.

Province AB BC MB ON QC
# by
province
# # # # #
% by
province
# # # # #
% in
HCSA
# # # # #
% in
non-
HCSA
# # # # #

Primus(CRTC)7May15-05 TNC 2015-134 Abridged

**** 2 of 2

The monthly non-discounted price for these plans is as follows: # #

#
#

# See Primus(CRTC)7May15-01 TNC 2015-134 for description of the baseline terms and optional services and features applicable to all Primus plans.

b) Primus’ three most popular wireline Internet plans are as follows: # #

#

#. The number and percentage of residential customers subscribing to these plans as of December 2014 in each province/territory the services are available as well as the percentage of customers located in HCSAs and non-HCSAs are shown in the following chart:

The non-discounted monthly price for these plans is as follows: # #

#
#
#

Pricing is national where the services are available, with some customers on a lower or higher price point depending on the terms of their promotional package and/or the point in time they activated their service. No caps or usage charges apply to these Internet plans.

# Filed with the Commission in confidence.

***End of Document ***
Province AB BC MB NS ON QC
# by
province
# # # # # #
% by
province
# # # # # #
% in
HCSA
# # # # # #
% in
non-
HCSA
# # # # # #

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2388639 - 2015-134 - Responses to requests for information - NETAGO.pdf

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2388639 - 2015-134 - Responses to requests for information - NETAGO.pdf

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2388639 - 2015-134 - Responses to requests for information - NETAGO.pdf

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2388639 - 2015-134 - Responses to requests for information - NETAGO.pdf

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2395609 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - 150714-The Companies-CRTC-7May15-3 TNC 2015-134 Att_ABR.pdf
14 July 2015 The Companie(CRTC)7May15-3 TNC 2015-134
Attachment
Abridged
**** 1 of 1
Bell Aliant

NB Note 1: High **** Ultra # # # # DSL internet service 79.45$ Y Up to 7Mbps / 640 Kbps Unlimited N/A NL Note 1: High **** Ultra # # # # DSL internet service 79.45$ Y Up to 7Mbps / 640 Kbps Unlimited N/A NS Note 1: High **** Ultra # # # # DSL internet service 79.45$ Y Up to 7Mbps / 640 Kbps Unlimited N/A ON Note 2: Fibe 5 # # # # DSL internet service 47.95$ Y Up to 5 Mbps / 1 Mbps 40 GB $4.00 per GB PE Note 1: High **** Ultra # # # # DSL internet service 79.45$ Y Up to 7Mbps / 640 Kbps Unlimited N/A QC Note 2: Fibe 5 # # # # DSL internet service 39.95$ Y Up to 5 Mbps / 1 Mbps 20 GB $4.00 per GBBell Canada

ON Note 2: Internet 5 # # # # DSL internet service 44.95$ Y Up to 5 Mbps / 800 Kbps 40 GB $4.00 per GB QC Note 2: Internet 5 # # # # DSL internet service 37.95$ Y Up to 5 Mbps / 800 Kbps 20 GB $4.00 per GBCVQ Internet Stand Alone 10 Mbps (cable only) # # # # Cable internet service 63.95$ Y Up to 10 Mbps/1 Mbps Unlimited N/ADMTS (ON) DSL & DSL Raw # # # # DSL internet services 39.95$ Y Up to 8 Mbps / 1 Mbps Unlimited N/AKMTS (ON) HS5 & HS5 Dry # # # # DSL internet services 38.95$ Y Up to 5 Mbps / 1 Mbps Unlimited N/ANorthernTel (ON)

Note 4: Internet Stand Alone 5 Mbps # # # # DSL internet service 48.95$ Y Up to 5 Mbps / 512 Kbps Unlimited N/ANote 5: **** Phone + HS 8 Mbps Bundle # # # # Phone and DSL internet bundle 68.67$ Y Up to 8 Mbps / 768 Kbps Unlimited N/ANorthwestel

AB Note 6: Internet 5 # # # # Cable internet service 62.95$ Y Up to 5 Mbps / 0.384 Mbps 40 GB $2.50 per GB BC Note 7: Internet 5 # # # # Cable internet service 62.95$ Y Up to 5 Mbps / 0.384 Mbps 40 GB $2.50 per GB NWT Note 8: Internet 5 # # # # Cable internet service 62.95$ Y Up to 5 Mbps / 0.384 Mbps 40 GB $2.50 per GB NU Note 9: Nunavut Internet 5 # # # # DSL internet service, satellite backhaul 179.95$ Y Up to 5 Mbps / 0.512 Mbps 30 GB $15.00 per GB YK Note 10: Internet 5 # # # # Cable internet service 62.95$ Y Up to 5 Mbps / 0.512 Mbps 40 GB $2.50 per GBOntera (ON) High **** # # # # DSL internet service 44.95$ Y Up to 5 Mbps / 0.800 Mbps Unlimited N/ATélébec (QC)

Note 11: SuperDuo 5 Mbps # # # # Phone, LD and DSL internet package 87.90$ N Up to 5 Mbps / 512 Kbps Unlimited N/ANote 12: Forfait Téléphonie + Internet 8 Mbps # # # # Phone and DSL internet bundle 64.23$ Y Up to 8 Mbps/768 Kbps Unlimited N/ANote 13: SuperDuo 10 Mbps (cable only) # # # # Phone and internet package 89.90$ Y Up to 10 Mbps/1 Mbps Unlimited N/ANotes

Note 1:
Note 2:
Note 3:
Note 4:
Note 5:
Note 6:
Note 7:
Note 8:
Note 9:
Note 10:
Note 11:
Note 12:
Note 13:
# Filed in confidence with the CRTC.
Data Cap Overage
Charges
% of
Customers on
Plans Closest
to 5/1Mbps in
HCSA

For Bell Aliant Atlantic, includes current Ultra Internet Plan stand alone offer. Also includes $111.45 bundle offer with High **** Ultra and **** Phone with unlimited calling features, $112.90 bundle offer with High **** Ultra and Satellite TV, $129.45 bundle offer with High **** Ultra and Bell Aliant TV, $155.40 bundle offer with High **** Ultra, Satellite TV, and **** Phone with unlimited calling features, and $149.95 bundle offer with High **** Ultra, Bell Aliant TV, and **** Phone with unlimited calling features. Each of these bundles feature up to 7 Mbps down / 640 Kbps up Internet speed.

For Bell Canada, and Bell Aliant Central in Quebec and Ontario the information shown represents the current internet plans: Fibe 5 ($47.95 for up to 5 Mbps down / 1 Mbps up with 40GB Usage in Ontario, $39.95 for up to 5 Mbps down /1 Mbps up with 20GB Usage in Quebec ), DSL Internet 5 ($44.95 for up to 5 Mbps down / 0.8 Mbps up with 40GB Usage in Ontario, $37.95 for up to 5 Mbps down / 0.8 Mbps up with 20GB Usage in Quebec), and DSL Internet 5 Plus ($49.95 for up to 5 Mbps down / 0.8 Mbps up with 140GB Usage in Ontario, $47.95 for up to 5 Mbps down / 0.8 Mbps up with 120GB Usage in Quebec). Included also grandfathered internet plans Performance($58.95 for up to 6 Mbps / 0.8 Mbps up with 25GB Usage in Ontario & $57.95 for up to 7 Mbps down / 0.8 Mbps up, 60GB Usage in Quebec). These plans all provide download speed in range 4 Mbps < x < 7 Mbps.

Internet Plan(s) Closest to 5Mbps / 1 Mbps, as at 31 December 2014
Universal ****
Availability ( Y/N ) Internet **** (Down/Up)
Included Internet
UsageCompany: Plan or Bundle Name: Description of Service
Non-
discounted
****
# of
Residence
Customers
% of Total
Provincial
Residential
Customers
% of
Customers on
Plans Closest
to 5/1Mbps in
NHCSA

For Bell Canada and Bell Aliant Central within Ontario and Quebec, the Company is excluding volumes for its Bell Wireless Internet 5 for deferral account communities because of the unique nature of the offering and the volumes are negligible.

For DMTS customers on DSL Raw plan, price also includes $3 dry loop charge. Customer counts shown are for DSL and DSL Raw plans. Current lowest speed offer in market is Internet HS 10 $42.95 for up to 10 Mbps down / 800kbps up and unlimited monthly usage.For Northern Tel, includes Internet Stand Alone 5Mbps current offer. Available where replaced SuperValu 5 Mbps $86.95 phone and DSL internet package featuring up to 5 Mbps down / 512 Kbps up with unlimited monthly usage now grandfathered, and also Advanced Telephone 5 Mbps $88.95 phone and internet package featuring up to 5 Mbps down / 512 kbps up with unlimited monthly usage also grandfathered for existing customers.

For Northern Tel, includes **** Phone + HS 8 Mbps Bundle current offer. Also currently in market with similar internet features is **** Phone + LD + HS 8 mbps $77.67 bundle offer of internet, phone and unlimited Can/US LD minutes. There are also existing customers on similar grandfathered bundle offers, **** Phone + Internet 8 Mbps (Forborne) $67.62, **** Phone + Internet 8 Mbps (Non-Forborne) $72.62, and **** Phone + HS 8 Mbps (1LRHS) $70.58 featuring up to 8 Mbps down / 768 Kbps up For Alberta HCSA, includes Internet 5 (Cable). Available where replaced HSI Standard (Cable) $62.95 up to 5 Mbps down / .384 Mbps up with 20 GB monthly usage included and $5.00 per GB overage and grandfathered.

For BC HCSA, includes Internet 5 (Cable). Available where replaced HSI Standard (Cable) $62.95 up to 5 Mbps down / 0.384 Mbps up with 20GB monthly usage included and $5.00 per GB overage, grandfathered to existing customers. includes also DSL Internet 5 $62.97 for up to 5 Mbps down / 0.512 Mbps up with 125 GB usage and $3.00 per GB overage charges which replaced Internet Ultra $87.95 up to 5 Mbps down / 0.512 up 60 GB cap and $5.00 per GB overage, grandfathered.

For NWT, includes Internet 5 (Cable). Offered within NWT cable footprint only and not in satellite communities. Also HSI Standard (Cable) $62.95 up to 5 Mbps down / 0.384 Mbps up with 20GB included and $5.00 per GB overage, grandfathered to existing customers. DSL Internet 5 $62.97 up to 5 Mbps down / 0.512 Mbps up with 125 GB usage and $3.00 per GB overage charges, available where Cable does not reach for a very small group of customers. Satellite communities includes DSL Satellite 2 $64.95 for up to 2.5 Mbps down / .384 Mbps up with 40 GB monthly usage and $3.00 per GB overage, and DSL Satellite Lite $41.95 for up to .768 Mbps down / .128 Mbps up with 10 G monthly usage and $3.00 per GB overage fee.

For NU HCSA includes Nunavut Internet 5 in Iqaluit. In other Satellite communities includes Nunavut Internet 2 $129.95 for up to 2.5 Mbps down / .512 Mbps up with 20 GB monthly usage and $15.00 per GB overage, and also Nunavut Internet 1.5 $99.95 for up to 1.5 Mbps down / .384 Mbps up with 15 G monthly usage and $17.50 per GB overage fee. Also Nunavut Internet Classic $69.95 for up to .768 Mbps down / .256 Mbps up with 10 G monthly usage and $20.00 per GB overage fee, and Nunavut Internet Lite $59.95 for up to .512 Mbps down / .128 Mbps up with 2 G monthly usage and $25.00 per GB overage fee.

For YK, includes Internet 5. Available where Cable TV also HSI Standard (Cable) $62.95 for up to 5 Mbps down / .384 Mbps up with 20GB monthly usage included and $5.00 per GB overage, grandfathered to existing customers. Also DSL Internet 5 $62.97 for up to 5 Mbps down / .512 Mbps up with 125 GB monthly usage and $3.00 per GB overage charges available for small group of customers where cable does not reach, and not offered in Old Crow. Satellite served includes DSL Internet 2 $64.95 for up to 2.5 Mbps down / .384 Mbps up with 40 GB usage $3 per GB overage, and DSL Internet Lite $41.94 for up to .768 Mbps down / .128 Mbps up with 10 GB usage $3.00 per GB overage fee.

For Télébec, includes current SuperDuo 5 Mbps internet and phone package with 1200 LD mins. Also currently in market with similar internet only features is Internet Stand Alone 5 Mbps $51.95 offer. There are also existing customers on similar grandfathered phone and internet package offers DuoValeurPlus 5 Mbps $67.95 and Téléphonie Évolué 5 Mbps $78.95 featuring up to 5 Mbps down / 512 Kbps up with unlimited monthly usage.

For Télébec, includes Forfait Téléphonie + Internet 8 Mbps current bundle offer. Also currently in market with similar internet features is Forfait Téléphonie + HV 8 Mbps $74.23 phone and internet bundle with 1200 LD minutes. There are also existing customers on similar grandfathered phone and internet bundles Forfait Ligne + Internet Haute-Vitesse $45.43, Forfait Ligne + HV 8 Mbps $50.43, and Forfait Ligne + HV 8 Mbps $52.28 all featuring up to 8 Mbps down / 768 Kbps up with unlimited monthly usage.For Télébec, includes current SuperDuo 10 Mbps cable phone and internet package offer. Also currently in market is Internet Stand Alone 10 Mbps $63.95 featuring up to 10 Mbps down /1 Mbps up with unlimited monthly usage. **** these offers available within cable footprint only.

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2395609 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - 150714-The Companies-CRTC-7May15-3 TNC 2015-134 Att_ABR.pdf
14 July 2015 The Companie(CRTC)7May15-3 TNC 2015-134
Attachment
Abridged
**** 1 of 1
Bell Aliant

NB Note 1: High **** Ultra # # # # DSL internet service 79.45$ Y Up to 7Mbps / 640 Kbps Unlimited N/A NL Note 1: High **** Ultra # # # # DSL internet service 79.45$ Y Up to 7Mbps / 640 Kbps Unlimited N/A NS Note 1: High **** Ultra # # # # DSL internet service 79.45$ Y Up to 7Mbps / 640 Kbps Unlimited N/A ON Note 2: Fibe 5 # # # # DSL internet service 47.95$ Y Up to 5 Mbps / 1 Mbps 40 GB $4.00 per GB PE Note 1: High **** Ultra # # # # DSL internet service 79.45$ Y Up to 7Mbps / 640 Kbps Unlimited N/A QC Note 2: Fibe 5 # # # # DSL internet service 39.95$ Y Up to 5 Mbps / 1 Mbps 20 GB $4.00 per GBBell Canada

ON Note 2: Internet 5 # # # # DSL internet service 44.95$ Y Up to 5 Mbps / 800 Kbps 40 GB $4.00 per GB QC Note 2: Internet 5 # # # # DSL internet service 37.95$ Y Up to 5 Mbps / 800 Kbps 20 GB $4.00 per GBCVQ Internet Stand Alone 10 Mbps (cable only) # # # # Cable internet service 63.95$ Y Up to 10 Mbps/1 Mbps Unlimited N/ADMTS (ON) DSL & DSL Raw # # # # DSL internet services 39.95$ Y Up to 8 Mbps / 1 Mbps Unlimited N/AKMTS (ON) HS5 & HS5 Dry # # # # DSL internet services 38.95$ Y Up to 5 Mbps / 1 Mbps Unlimited N/ANorthernTel (ON)

Note 4: Internet Stand Alone 5 Mbps # # # # DSL internet service 48.95$ Y Up to 5 Mbps / 512 Kbps Unlimited N/ANote 5: **** Phone + HS 8 Mbps Bundle # # # # Phone and DSL internet bundle 68.67$ Y Up to 8 Mbps / 768 Kbps Unlimited N/ANorthwestel

AB Note 6: Internet 5 # # # # Cable internet service 62.95$ Y Up to 5 Mbps / 0.384 Mbps 40 GB $2.50 per GB BC Note 7: Internet 5 # # # # Cable internet service 62.95$ Y Up to 5 Mbps / 0.384 Mbps 40 GB $2.50 per GB NWT Note 8: Internet 5 # # # # Cable internet service 62.95$ Y Up to 5 Mbps / 0.384 Mbps 40 GB $2.50 per GB NU Note 9: Nunavut Internet 5 # # # # DSL internet service, satellite backhaul 179.95$ Y Up to 5 Mbps / 0.512 Mbps 30 GB $15.00 per GB YK Note 10: Internet 5 # # # # Cable internet service 62.95$ Y Up to 5 Mbps / 0.512 Mbps 40 GB $2.50 per GBOntera (ON) High **** # # # # DSL internet service 44.95$ Y Up to 5 Mbps / 0.800 Mbps Unlimited N/ATélébec (QC)

Note 11: SuperDuo 5 Mbps # # # # Phone, LD and DSL internet package 87.90$ N Up to 5 Mbps / 512 Kbps Unlimited N/ANote 12: Forfait Téléphonie + Internet 8 Mbps # # # # Phone and DSL internet bundle 64.23$ Y Up to 8 Mbps/768 Kbps Unlimited N/ANote 13: SuperDuo 10 Mbps (cable only) # # # # Phone and internet package 89.90$ Y Up to 10 Mbps/1 Mbps Unlimited N/ANotes

Note 1:
Note 2:
Note 3:
Note 4:
Note 5:
Note 6:
Note 7:
Note 8:
Note 9:
Note 10:
Note 11:
Note 12:
Note 13:
# Filed in confidence with the CRTC.
Data Cap Overage
Charges
% of
Customers on
Plans Closest
to 5/1Mbps in
HCSA

For Bell Aliant Atlantic, includes current Ultra Internet Plan stand alone offer. Also includes $111.45 bundle offer with High **** Ultra and **** Phone with unlimited calling features, $112.90 bundle offer with High **** Ultra and Satellite TV, $129.45 bundle offer with High **** Ultra and Bell Aliant TV, $155.40 bundle offer with High **** Ultra, Satellite TV, and **** Phone with unlimited calling features, and $149.95 bundle offer with High **** Ultra, Bell Aliant TV, and **** Phone with unlimited calling features. Each of these bundles feature up to 7 Mbps down / 640 Kbps up Internet speed.

For Bell Canada, and Bell Aliant Central in Quebec and Ontario the information shown represents the current internet plans: Fibe 5 ($47.95 for up to 5 Mbps down / 1 Mbps up with 40GB Usage in Ontario, $39.95 for up to 5 Mbps down /1 Mbps up with 20GB Usage in Quebec ), DSL Internet 5 ($44.95 for up to 5 Mbps down / 0.8 Mbps up with 40GB Usage in Ontario, $37.95 for up to 5 Mbps down / 0.8 Mbps up with 20GB Usage in Quebec), and DSL Internet 5 Plus ($49.95 for up to 5 Mbps down / 0.8 Mbps up with 140GB Usage in Ontario, $47.95 for up to 5 Mbps down / 0.8 Mbps up with 120GB Usage in Quebec). Included also grandfathered internet plans Performance($58.95 for up to 6 Mbps / 0.8 Mbps up with 25GB Usage in Ontario & $57.95 for up to 7 Mbps down / 0.8 Mbps up, 60GB Usage in Quebec). These plans all provide download speed in range 4 Mbps < x < 7 Mbps.

Internet Plan(s) Closest to 5Mbps / 1 Mbps, as at 31 December 2014
Universal ****
Availability ( Y/N ) Internet **** (Down/Up)
Included Internet
UsageCompany: Plan or Bundle Name: Description of Service
Non-
discounted
****
# of
Residence
Customers
% of Total
Provincial
Residential
Customers
% of
Customers on
Plans Closest
to 5/1Mbps in
NHCSA

For Bell Canada and Bell Aliant Central within Ontario and Quebec, the Company is excluding volumes for its Bell Wireless Internet 5 for deferral account communities because of the unique nature of the offering and the volumes are negligible.

For DMTS customers on DSL Raw plan, price also includes $3 dry loop charge. Customer counts shown are for DSL and DSL Raw plans. Current lowest speed offer in market is Internet HS 10 $42.95 for up to 10 Mbps down / 800kbps up and unlimited monthly usage.For Northern Tel, includes Internet Stand Alone 5Mbps current offer. Available where replaced SuperValu 5 Mbps $86.95 phone and DSL internet package featuring up to 5 Mbps down / 512 Kbps up with unlimited monthly usage now grandfathered, and also Advanced Telephone 5 Mbps $88.95 phone and internet package featuring up to 5 Mbps down / 512 kbps up with unlimited monthly usage also grandfathered for existing customers.

For Northern Tel, includes **** Phone + HS 8 Mbps Bundle current offer. Also currently in market with similar internet features is **** Phone + LD + HS 8 mbps $77.67 bundle offer of internet, phone and unlimited Can/US LD minutes. There are also existing customers on similar grandfathered bundle offers, **** Phone + Internet 8 Mbps (Forborne) $67.62, **** Phone + Internet 8 Mbps (Non-Forborne) $72.62, and **** Phone + HS 8 Mbps (1LRHS) $70.58 featuring up to 8 Mbps down / 768 Kbps up For Alberta HCSA, includes Internet 5 (Cable). Available where replaced HSI Standard (Cable) $62.95 up to 5 Mbps down / .384 Mbps up with 20 GB monthly usage included and $5.00 per GB overage and grandfathered.

For BC HCSA, includes Internet 5 (Cable). Available where replaced HSI Standard (Cable) $62.95 up to 5 Mbps down / 0.384 Mbps up with 20GB monthly usage included and $5.00 per GB overage, grandfathered to existing customers. includes also DSL Internet 5 $62.97 for up to 5 Mbps down / 0.512 Mbps up with 125 GB usage and $3.00 per GB overage charges which replaced Internet Ultra $87.95 up to 5 Mbps down / 0.512 up 60 GB cap and $5.00 per GB overage, grandfathered.

For NWT, includes Internet 5 (Cable). Offered within NWT cable footprint only and not in satellite communities. Also HSI Standard (Cable) $62.95 up to 5 Mbps down / 0.384 Mbps up with 20GB included and $5.00 per GB overage, grandfathered to existing customers. DSL Internet 5 $62.97 up to 5 Mbps down / 0.512 Mbps up with 125 GB usage and $3.00 per GB overage charges, available where Cable does not reach for a very small group of customers. Satellite communities includes DSL Satellite 2 $64.95 for up to 2.5 Mbps down / .384 Mbps up with 40 GB monthly usage and $3.00 per GB overage, and DSL Satellite Lite $41.95 for up to .768 Mbps down / .128 Mbps up with 10 G monthly usage and $3.00 per GB overage fee.

For NU HCSA includes Nunavut Internet 5 in Iqaluit. In other Satellite communities includes Nunavut Internet 2 $129.95 for up to 2.5 Mbps down / .512 Mbps up with 20 GB monthly usage and $15.00 per GB overage, and also Nunavut Internet 1.5 $99.95 for up to 1.5 Mbps down / .384 Mbps up with 15 G monthly usage and $17.50 per GB overage fee. Also Nunavut Internet Classic $69.95 for up to .768 Mbps down / .256 Mbps up with 10 G monthly usage and $20.00 per GB overage fee, and Nunavut Internet Lite $59.95 for up to .512 Mbps down / .128 Mbps up with 2 G monthly usage and $25.00 per GB overage fee.

For YK, includes Internet 5. Available where Cable TV also HSI Standard (Cable) $62.95 for up to 5 Mbps down / .384 Mbps up with 20GB monthly usage included and $5.00 per GB overage, grandfathered to existing customers. Also DSL Internet 5 $62.97 for up to 5 Mbps down / .512 Mbps up with 125 GB monthly usage and $3.00 per GB overage charges available for small group of customers where cable does not reach, and not offered in Old Crow. Satellite served includes DSL Internet 2 $64.95 for up to 2.5 Mbps down / .384 Mbps up with 40 GB usage $3 per GB overage, and DSL Internet Lite $41.94 for up to .768 Mbps down / .128 Mbps up with 10 GB usage $3.00 per GB overage fee.

For Télébec, includes current SuperDuo 5 Mbps internet and phone package with 1200 LD mins. Also currently in market with similar internet only features is Internet Stand Alone 5 Mbps $51.95 offer. There are also existing customers on similar grandfathered phone and internet package offers DuoValeurPlus 5 Mbps $67.95 and Téléphonie Évolué 5 Mbps $78.95 featuring up to 5 Mbps down / 512 Kbps up with unlimited monthly usage.

For Télébec, includes Forfait Téléphonie + Internet 8 Mbps current bundle offer. Also currently in market with similar internet features is Forfait Téléphonie + HV 8 Mbps $74.23 phone and internet bundle with 1200 LD minutes. There are also existing customers on similar grandfathered phone and internet bundles Forfait Ligne + Internet Haute-Vitesse $45.43, Forfait Ligne + HV 8 Mbps $50.43, and Forfait Ligne + HV 8 Mbps $52.28 all featuring up to 8 Mbps down / 768 Kbps up with unlimited monthly usage.For Télébec, includes current SuperDuo 10 Mbps cable phone and internet package offer. Also currently in market is Internet Stand Alone 10 Mbps $63.95 featuring up to 10 Mbps down /1 Mbps up with unlimited monthly usage. **** these offers available within cable footprint only.

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2395609 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - 150714-The Companies-CRTC-7May15-3 TNC 2015-134 Att_ABR.pdf
14 July 2015 The Companie(CRTC)7May15-3 TNC 2015-134
Attachment
Abridged
**** 1 of 1
Bell Aliant

NB Note 1: High **** Ultra # # # # DSL internet service 79.45$ Y Up to 7Mbps / 640 Kbps Unlimited N/A NL Note 1: High **** Ultra # # # # DSL internet service 79.45$ Y Up to 7Mbps / 640 Kbps Unlimited N/A NS Note 1: High **** Ultra # # # # DSL internet service 79.45$ Y Up to 7Mbps / 640 Kbps Unlimited N/A ON Note 2: Fibe 5 # # # # DSL internet service 47.95$ Y Up to 5 Mbps / 1 Mbps 40 GB $4.00 per GB PE Note 1: High **** Ultra # # # # DSL internet service 79.45$ Y Up to 7Mbps / 640 Kbps Unlimited N/A QC Note 2: Fibe 5 # # # # DSL internet service 39.95$ Y Up to 5 Mbps / 1 Mbps 20 GB $4.00 per GBBell Canada

ON Note 2: Internet 5 # # # # DSL internet service 44.95$ Y Up to 5 Mbps / 800 Kbps 40 GB $4.00 per GB QC Note 2: Internet 5 # # # # DSL internet service 37.95$ Y Up to 5 Mbps / 800 Kbps 20 GB $4.00 per GBCVQ Internet Stand Alone 10 Mbps (cable only) # # # # Cable internet service 63.95$ Y Up to 10 Mbps/1 Mbps Unlimited N/ADMTS (ON) DSL & DSL Raw # # # # DSL internet services 39.95$ Y Up to 8 Mbps / 1 Mbps Unlimited N/AKMTS (ON) HS5 & HS5 Dry # # # # DSL internet services 38.95$ Y Up to 5 Mbps / 1 Mbps Unlimited N/ANorthernTel (ON)

Note 4: Internet Stand Alone 5 Mbps # # # # DSL internet service 48.95$ Y Up to 5 Mbps / 512 Kbps Unlimited N/ANote 5: **** Phone + HS 8 Mbps Bundle # # # # Phone and DSL internet bundle 68.67$ Y Up to 8 Mbps / 768 Kbps Unlimited N/ANorthwestel

AB Note 6: Internet 5 # # # # Cable internet service 62.95$ Y Up to 5 Mbps / 0.384 Mbps 40 GB $2.50 per GB BC Note 7: Internet 5 # # # # Cable internet service 62.95$ Y Up to 5 Mbps / 0.384 Mbps 40 GB $2.50 per GB NWT Note 8: Internet 5 # # # # Cable internet service 62.95$ Y Up to 5 Mbps / 0.384 Mbps 40 GB $2.50 per GB NU Note 9: Nunavut Internet 5 # # # # DSL internet service, satellite backhaul 179.95$ Y Up to 5 Mbps / 0.512 Mbps 30 GB $15.00 per GB YK Note 10: Internet 5 # # # # Cable internet service 62.95$ Y Up to 5 Mbps / 0.512 Mbps 40 GB $2.50 per GBOntera (ON) High **** # # # # DSL internet service 44.95$ Y Up to 5 Mbps / 0.800 Mbps Unlimited N/ATélébec (QC)

Note 11: SuperDuo 5 Mbps # # # # Phone, LD and DSL internet package 87.90$ N Up to 5 Mbps / 512 Kbps Unlimited N/ANote 12: Forfait Téléphonie + Internet 8 Mbps # # # # Phone and DSL internet bundle 64.23$ Y Up to 8 Mbps/768 Kbps Unlimited N/ANote 13: SuperDuo 10 Mbps (cable only) # # # # Phone and internet package 89.90$ Y Up to 10 Mbps/1 Mbps Unlimited N/ANotes

Note 1:
Note 2:
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Note 5:
Note 6:
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Note 8:
Note 9:
Note 10:
Note 11:
Note 12:
Note 13:
# Filed in confidence with the CRTC.
Data Cap Overage
Charges
% of
Customers on
Plans Closest
to 5/1Mbps in
HCSA

For Bell Aliant Atlantic, includes current Ultra Internet Plan stand alone offer. Also includes $111.45 bundle offer with High **** Ultra and **** Phone with unlimited calling features, $112.90 bundle offer with High **** Ultra and Satellite TV, $129.45 bundle offer with High **** Ultra and Bell Aliant TV, $155.40 bundle offer with High **** Ultra, Satellite TV, and **** Phone with unlimited calling features, and $149.95 bundle offer with High **** Ultra, Bell Aliant TV, and **** Phone with unlimited calling features. Each of these bundles feature up to 7 Mbps down / 640 Kbps up Internet speed.

For Bell Canada, and Bell Aliant Central in Quebec and Ontario the information shown represents the current internet plans: Fibe 5 ($47.95 for up to 5 Mbps down / 1 Mbps up with 40GB Usage in Ontario, $39.95 for up to 5 Mbps down /1 Mbps up with 20GB Usage in Quebec ), DSL Internet 5 ($44.95 for up to 5 Mbps down / 0.8 Mbps up with 40GB Usage in Ontario, $37.95 for up to 5 Mbps down / 0.8 Mbps up with 20GB Usage in Quebec), and DSL Internet 5 Plus ($49.95 for up to 5 Mbps down / 0.8 Mbps up with 140GB Usage in Ontario, $47.95 for up to 5 Mbps down / 0.8 Mbps up with 120GB Usage in Quebec). Included also grandfathered internet plans Performance($58.95 for up to 6 Mbps / 0.8 Mbps up with 25GB Usage in Ontario & $57.95 for up to 7 Mbps down / 0.8 Mbps up, 60GB Usage in Quebec). These plans all provide download speed in range 4 Mbps < x < 7 Mbps.

Internet Plan(s) Closest to 5Mbps / 1 Mbps, as at 31 December 2014
Universal ****
Availability ( Y/N ) Internet **** (Down/Up)
Included Internet
UsageCompany: Plan or Bundle Name: Description of Service
Non-
discounted
****
# of
Residence
Customers
% of Total
Provincial
Residential
Customers
% of
Customers on
Plans Closest
to 5/1Mbps in
NHCSA

For Bell Canada and Bell Aliant Central within Ontario and Quebec, the Company is excluding volumes for its Bell Wireless Internet 5 for deferral account communities because of the unique nature of the offering and the volumes are negligible.

For DMTS customers on DSL Raw plan, price also includes $3 dry loop charge. Customer counts shown are for DSL and DSL Raw plans. Current lowest speed offer in market is Internet HS 10 $42.95 for up to 10 Mbps down / 800kbps up and unlimited monthly usage.For Northern Tel, includes Internet Stand Alone 5Mbps current offer. Available where replaced SuperValu 5 Mbps $86.95 phone and DSL internet package featuring up to 5 Mbps down / 512 Kbps up with unlimited monthly usage now grandfathered, and also Advanced Telephone 5 Mbps $88.95 phone and internet package featuring up to 5 Mbps down / 512 kbps up with unlimited monthly usage also grandfathered for existing customers.

For Northern Tel, includes **** Phone + HS 8 Mbps Bundle current offer. Also currently in market with similar internet features is **** Phone + LD + HS 8 mbps $77.67 bundle offer of internet, phone and unlimited Can/US LD minutes. There are also existing customers on similar grandfathered bundle offers, **** Phone + Internet 8 Mbps (Forborne) $67.62, **** Phone + Internet 8 Mbps (Non-Forborne) $72.62, and **** Phone + HS 8 Mbps (1LRHS) $70.58 featuring up to 8 Mbps down / 768 Kbps up For Alberta HCSA, includes Internet 5 (Cable). Available where replaced HSI Standard (Cable) $62.95 up to 5 Mbps down / .384 Mbps up with 20 GB monthly usage included and $5.00 per GB overage and grandfathered.

For BC HCSA, includes Internet 5 (Cable). Available where replaced HSI Standard (Cable) $62.95 up to 5 Mbps down / 0.384 Mbps up with 20GB monthly usage included and $5.00 per GB overage, grandfathered to existing customers. includes also DSL Internet 5 $62.97 for up to 5 Mbps down / 0.512 Mbps up with 125 GB usage and $3.00 per GB overage charges which replaced Internet Ultra $87.95 up to 5 Mbps down / 0.512 up 60 GB cap and $5.00 per GB overage, grandfathered.

For NWT, includes Internet 5 (Cable). Offered within NWT cable footprint only and not in satellite communities. Also HSI Standard (Cable) $62.95 up to 5 Mbps down / 0.384 Mbps up with 20GB included and $5.00 per GB overage, grandfathered to existing customers. DSL Internet 5 $62.97 up to 5 Mbps down / 0.512 Mbps up with 125 GB usage and $3.00 per GB overage charges, available where Cable does not reach for a very small group of customers. Satellite communities includes DSL Satellite 2 $64.95 for up to 2.5 Mbps down / .384 Mbps up with 40 GB monthly usage and $3.00 per GB overage, and DSL Satellite Lite $41.95 for up to .768 Mbps down / .128 Mbps up with 10 G monthly usage and $3.00 per GB overage fee.

For NU HCSA includes Nunavut Internet 5 in Iqaluit. In other Satellite communities includes Nunavut Internet 2 $129.95 for up to 2.5 Mbps down / .512 Mbps up with 20 GB monthly usage and $15.00 per GB overage, and also Nunavut Internet 1.5 $99.95 for up to 1.5 Mbps down / .384 Mbps up with 15 G monthly usage and $17.50 per GB overage fee. Also Nunavut Internet Classic $69.95 for up to .768 Mbps down / .256 Mbps up with 10 G monthly usage and $20.00 per GB overage fee, and Nunavut Internet Lite $59.95 for up to .512 Mbps down / .128 Mbps up with 2 G monthly usage and $25.00 per GB overage fee.

For YK, includes Internet 5. Available where Cable TV also HSI Standard (Cable) $62.95 for up to 5 Mbps down / .384 Mbps up with 20GB monthly usage included and $5.00 per GB overage, grandfathered to existing customers. Also DSL Internet 5 $62.97 for up to 5 Mbps down / .512 Mbps up with 125 GB monthly usage and $3.00 per GB overage charges available for small group of customers where cable does not reach, and not offered in Old Crow. Satellite served includes DSL Internet 2 $64.95 for up to 2.5 Mbps down / .384 Mbps up with 40 GB usage $3 per GB overage, and DSL Internet Lite $41.94 for up to .768 Mbps down / .128 Mbps up with 10 GB usage $3.00 per GB overage fee.

For Télébec, includes current SuperDuo 5 Mbps internet and phone package with 1200 LD mins. Also currently in market with similar internet only features is Internet Stand Alone 5 Mbps $51.95 offer. There are also existing customers on similar grandfathered phone and internet package offers DuoValeurPlus 5 Mbps $67.95 and Téléphonie Évolué 5 Mbps $78.95 featuring up to 5 Mbps down / 512 Kbps up with unlimited monthly usage.

For Télébec, includes Forfait Téléphonie + Internet 8 Mbps current bundle offer. Also currently in market with similar internet features is Forfait Téléphonie + HV 8 Mbps $74.23 phone and internet bundle with 1200 LD minutes. There are also existing customers on similar grandfathered phone and internet bundles Forfait Ligne + Internet Haute-Vitesse $45.43, Forfait Ligne + HV 8 Mbps $50.43, and Forfait Ligne + HV 8 Mbps $52.28 all featuring up to 8 Mbps down / 768 Kbps up with unlimited monthly usage.For Télébec, includes current SuperDuo 10 Mbps cable phone and internet package offer. Also currently in market is Internet Stand Alone 10 Mbps $63.95 featuring up to 10 Mbps down /1 Mbps up with unlimited monthly usage. **** these offers available within cable footprint only.

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2395609 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - 150714-The Companies-CRTC-7May15-3 TNC 2015-134 Att_ABR.pdf
14 July 2015 The Companie(CRTC)7May15-3 TNC 2015-134
Attachment
Abridged
**** 1 of 1
Bell Aliant

NB Note 1: High **** Ultra # # # # DSL internet service 79.45$ Y Up to 7Mbps / 640 Kbps Unlimited N/A NL Note 1: High **** Ultra # # # # DSL internet service 79.45$ Y Up to 7Mbps / 640 Kbps Unlimited N/A NS Note 1: High **** Ultra # # # # DSL internet service 79.45$ Y Up to 7Mbps / 640 Kbps Unlimited N/A ON Note 2: Fibe 5 # # # # DSL internet service 47.95$ Y Up to 5 Mbps / 1 Mbps 40 GB $4.00 per GB PE Note 1: High **** Ultra # # # # DSL internet service 79.45$ Y Up to 7Mbps / 640 Kbps Unlimited N/A QC Note 2: Fibe 5 # # # # DSL internet service 39.95$ Y Up to 5 Mbps / 1 Mbps 20 GB $4.00 per GBBell Canada

ON Note 2: Internet 5 # # # # DSL internet service 44.95$ Y Up to 5 Mbps / 800 Kbps 40 GB $4.00 per GB QC Note 2: Internet 5 # # # # DSL internet service 37.95$ Y Up to 5 Mbps / 800 Kbps 20 GB $4.00 per GBCVQ Internet Stand Alone 10 Mbps (cable only) # # # # Cable internet service 63.95$ Y Up to 10 Mbps/1 Mbps Unlimited N/ADMTS (ON) DSL & DSL Raw # # # # DSL internet services 39.95$ Y Up to 8 Mbps / 1 Mbps Unlimited N/AKMTS (ON) HS5 & HS5 Dry # # # # DSL internet services 38.95$ Y Up to 5 Mbps / 1 Mbps Unlimited N/ANorthernTel (ON)

Note 4: Internet Stand Alone 5 Mbps # # # # DSL internet service 48.95$ Y Up to 5 Mbps / 512 Kbps Unlimited N/ANote 5: **** Phone + HS 8 Mbps Bundle # # # # Phone and DSL internet bundle 68.67$ Y Up to 8 Mbps / 768 Kbps Unlimited N/ANorthwestel

AB Note 6: Internet 5 # # # # Cable internet service 62.95$ Y Up to 5 Mbps / 0.384 Mbps 40 GB $2.50 per GB BC Note 7: Internet 5 # # # # Cable internet service 62.95$ Y Up to 5 Mbps / 0.384 Mbps 40 GB $2.50 per GB NWT Note 8: Internet 5 # # # # Cable internet service 62.95$ Y Up to 5 Mbps / 0.384 Mbps 40 GB $2.50 per GB NU Note 9: Nunavut Internet 5 # # # # DSL internet service, satellite backhaul 179.95$ Y Up to 5 Mbps / 0.512 Mbps 30 GB $15.00 per GB YK Note 10: Internet 5 # # # # Cable internet service 62.95$ Y Up to 5 Mbps / 0.512 Mbps 40 GB $2.50 per GBOntera (ON) High **** # # # # DSL internet service 44.95$ Y Up to 5 Mbps / 0.800 Mbps Unlimited N/ATélébec (QC)

Note 11: SuperDuo 5 Mbps # # # # Phone, LD and DSL internet package 87.90$ N Up to 5 Mbps / 512 Kbps Unlimited N/ANote 12: Forfait Téléphonie + Internet 8 Mbps # # # # Phone and DSL internet bundle 64.23$ Y Up to 8 Mbps/768 Kbps Unlimited N/ANote 13: SuperDuo 10 Mbps (cable only) # # # # Phone and internet package 89.90$ Y Up to 10 Mbps/1 Mbps Unlimited N/ANotes

Note 1:
Note 2:
Note 3:
Note 4:
Note 5:
Note 6:
Note 7:
Note 8:
Note 9:
Note 10:
Note 11:
Note 12:
Note 13:
# Filed in confidence with the CRTC.
Data Cap Overage
Charges
% of
Customers on
Plans Closest
to 5/1Mbps in
HCSA

For Bell Aliant Atlantic, includes current Ultra Internet Plan stand alone offer. Also includes $111.45 bundle offer with High **** Ultra and **** Phone with unlimited calling features, $112.90 bundle offer with High **** Ultra and Satellite TV, $129.45 bundle offer with High **** Ultra and Bell Aliant TV, $155.40 bundle offer with High **** Ultra, Satellite TV, and **** Phone with unlimited calling features, and $149.95 bundle offer with High **** Ultra, Bell Aliant TV, and **** Phone with unlimited calling features. Each of these bundles feature up to 7 Mbps down / 640 Kbps up Internet speed.

For Bell Canada, and Bell Aliant Central in Quebec and Ontario the information shown represents the current internet plans: Fibe 5 ($47.95 for up to 5 Mbps down / 1 Mbps up with 40GB Usage in Ontario, $39.95 for up to 5 Mbps down /1 Mbps up with 20GB Usage in Quebec ), DSL Internet 5 ($44.95 for up to 5 Mbps down / 0.8 Mbps up with 40GB Usage in Ontario, $37.95 for up to 5 Mbps down / 0.8 Mbps up with 20GB Usage in Quebec), and DSL Internet 5 Plus ($49.95 for up to 5 Mbps down / 0.8 Mbps up with 140GB Usage in Ontario, $47.95 for up to 5 Mbps down / 0.8 Mbps up with 120GB Usage in Quebec). Included also grandfathered internet plans Performance($58.95 for up to 6 Mbps / 0.8 Mbps up with 25GB Usage in Ontario & $57.95 for up to 7 Mbps down / 0.8 Mbps up, 60GB Usage in Quebec). These plans all provide download speed in range 4 Mbps < x < 7 Mbps.

Internet Plan(s) Closest to 5Mbps / 1 Mbps, as at 31 December 2014
Universal ****
Availability ( Y/N ) Internet **** (Down/Up)
Included Internet
UsageCompany: Plan or Bundle Name: Description of Service
Non-
discounted
****
# of
Residence
Customers
% of Total
Provincial
Residential
Customers
% of
Customers on
Plans Closest
to 5/1Mbps in
NHCSA

For Bell Canada and Bell Aliant Central within Ontario and Quebec, the Company is excluding volumes for its Bell Wireless Internet 5 for deferral account communities because of the unique nature of the offering and the volumes are negligible.

For DMTS customers on DSL Raw plan, price also includes $3 dry loop charge. Customer counts shown are for DSL and DSL Raw plans. Current lowest speed offer in market is Internet HS 10 $42.95 for up to 10 Mbps down / 800kbps up and unlimited monthly usage.For Northern Tel, includes Internet Stand Alone 5Mbps current offer. Available where replaced SuperValu 5 Mbps $86.95 phone and DSL internet package featuring up to 5 Mbps down / 512 Kbps up with unlimited monthly usage now grandfathered, and also Advanced Telephone 5 Mbps $88.95 phone and internet package featuring up to 5 Mbps down / 512 kbps up with unlimited monthly usage also grandfathered for existing customers.

For Northern Tel, includes **** Phone + HS 8 Mbps Bundle current offer. Also currently in market with similar internet features is **** Phone + LD + HS 8 mbps $77.67 bundle offer of internet, phone and unlimited Can/US LD minutes. There are also existing customers on similar grandfathered bundle offers, **** Phone + Internet 8 Mbps (Forborne) $67.62, **** Phone + Internet 8 Mbps (Non-Forborne) $72.62, and **** Phone + HS 8 Mbps (1LRHS) $70.58 featuring up to 8 Mbps down / 768 Kbps up For Alberta HCSA, includes Internet 5 (Cable). Available where replaced HSI Standard (Cable) $62.95 up to 5 Mbps down / .384 Mbps up with 20 GB monthly usage included and $5.00 per GB overage and grandfathered.

For BC HCSA, includes Internet 5 (Cable). Available where replaced HSI Standard (Cable) $62.95 up to 5 Mbps down / 0.384 Mbps up with 20GB monthly usage included and $5.00 per GB overage, grandfathered to existing customers. includes also DSL Internet 5 $62.97 for up to 5 Mbps down / 0.512 Mbps up with 125 GB usage and $3.00 per GB overage charges which replaced Internet Ultra $87.95 up to 5 Mbps down / 0.512 up 60 GB cap and $5.00 per GB overage, grandfathered.

For NWT, includes Internet 5 (Cable). Offered within NWT cable footprint only and not in satellite communities. Also HSI Standard (Cable) $62.95 up to 5 Mbps down / 0.384 Mbps up with 20GB included and $5.00 per GB overage, grandfathered to existing customers. DSL Internet 5 $62.97 up to 5 Mbps down / 0.512 Mbps up with 125 GB usage and $3.00 per GB overage charges, available where Cable does not reach for a very small group of customers. Satellite communities includes DSL Satellite 2 $64.95 for up to 2.5 Mbps down / .384 Mbps up with 40 GB monthly usage and $3.00 per GB overage, and DSL Satellite Lite $41.95 for up to .768 Mbps down / .128 Mbps up with 10 G monthly usage and $3.00 per GB overage fee.

For NU HCSA includes Nunavut Internet 5 in Iqaluit. In other Satellite communities includes Nunavut Internet 2 $129.95 for up to 2.5 Mbps down / .512 Mbps up with 20 GB monthly usage and $15.00 per GB overage, and also Nunavut Internet 1.5 $99.95 for up to 1.5 Mbps down / .384 Mbps up with 15 G monthly usage and $17.50 per GB overage fee. Also Nunavut Internet Classic $69.95 for up to .768 Mbps down / .256 Mbps up with 10 G monthly usage and $20.00 per GB overage fee, and Nunavut Internet Lite $59.95 for up to .512 Mbps down / .128 Mbps up with 2 G monthly usage and $25.00 per GB overage fee.

For YK, includes Internet 5. Available where Cable TV also HSI Standard (Cable) $62.95 for up to 5 Mbps down / .384 Mbps up with 20GB monthly usage included and $5.00 per GB overage, grandfathered to existing customers. Also DSL Internet 5 $62.97 for up to 5 Mbps down / .512 Mbps up with 125 GB monthly usage and $3.00 per GB overage charges available for small group of customers where cable does not reach, and not offered in Old Crow. Satellite served includes DSL Internet 2 $64.95 for up to 2.5 Mbps down / .384 Mbps up with 40 GB usage $3 per GB overage, and DSL Internet Lite $41.94 for up to .768 Mbps down / .128 Mbps up with 10 GB usage $3.00 per GB overage fee.

For Télébec, includes current SuperDuo 5 Mbps internet and phone package with 1200 LD mins. Also currently in market with similar internet only features is Internet Stand Alone 5 Mbps $51.95 offer. There are also existing customers on similar grandfathered phone and internet package offers DuoValeurPlus 5 Mbps $67.95 and Téléphonie Évolué 5 Mbps $78.95 featuring up to 5 Mbps down / 512 Kbps up with unlimited monthly usage.

For Télébec, includes Forfait Téléphonie + Internet 8 Mbps current bundle offer. Also currently in market with similar internet features is Forfait Téléphonie + HV 8 Mbps $74.23 phone and internet bundle with 1200 LD minutes. There are also existing customers on similar grandfathered phone and internet bundles Forfait Ligne + Internet Haute-Vitesse $45.43, Forfait Ligne + HV 8 Mbps $50.43, and Forfait Ligne + HV 8 Mbps $52.28 all featuring up to 8 Mbps down / 768 Kbps up with unlimited monthly usage.For Télébec, includes current SuperDuo 10 Mbps cable phone and internet package offer. Also currently in market is Internet Stand Alone 10 Mbps $63.95 featuring up to 10 Mbps down /1 Mbps up with unlimited monthly usage. **** these offers available within cable footprint only.

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2395125 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - TNOC CRTC 2015-134 Telesat Responses to RFI_Cover Letter.pdf
Tele sat.
File No. 8663-C12-2015503186
July 14, 2015
Mr. John Traversy
Secretary General
Canadian Radio-television and
Telecommunications Commission
Ottawa, Ontario
*** ***

Subject: Telecom Notice of Consultation CRTC 2015-134, Review of basictelecommunications services (TNOC 2015-134) - Requests for Information**** Mr. Traversy,

On May 7, 2015 Telesat received requests for information from the Commission pursuant toparagraph 39 of Telecom Notice of Consultation 2015-134. In its letter the Commissionindicated that telecommunications service providers (TSPs) identified in the associateddistribution list are to file responses to the questions by 30 **** 2015, which was subsequentlyrevised to 14 July 2015. The Commission further noted that a response of "not applicable"should be indicated if the information requested in a specific question does not apply.

Telesat's responses to the request for information are attached. However, Telesat notes thatnone of the requests for information apply to its current activities and, accordingly, "notapplicable" is indicated in each of its responses.

Yours truly,
[Original Signed by Ian ****]
Ian ****
Executive Director,
Government and Regulatory Affairs
***End of Document*

1601 Telesat ****, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada *** ***Automated: +1-*-***-***-**** Tel: +1-613-74B-0123 Fax:+1-*-***-***-**** www.telesat.com

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2395125 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - TNOC CRTC 2015-134 Telesat Responses to RFI_Cover Letter.pdf
Tele sat.
File No. 8663-C12-2015503186
July 14, 2015
Mr. John Traversy
Secretary General
Canadian Radio-television and
Telecommunications Commission
Ottawa, Ontario
*** ***

Subject: Telecom Notice of Consultation CRTC 2015-134, Review of basictelecommunications services (TNOC 2015-134) - Requests for Information**** Mr. Traversy,

On May 7, 2015 Telesat received requests for information from the Commission pursuant toparagraph 39 of Telecom Notice of Consultation 2015-134. In its letter the Commissionindicated that telecommunications service providers (TSPs) identified in the associateddistribution list are to file responses to the questions by 30 **** 2015, which was subsequentlyrevised to 14 July 2015. The Commission further noted that a response of "not applicable"should be indicated if the information requested in a specific question does not apply.

Telesat's responses to the request for information are attached. However, Telesat notes thatnone of the requests for information apply to its current activities and, accordingly, "notapplicable" is indicated in each of its responses.

Yours truly,
[Original Signed by Ian ****]
Ian ****
Executive Director,
Government and Regulatory Affairs
***End of Document*

1601 Telesat ****, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada *** ***Automated: +1-*-***-***-**** Tel: +1-613-74B-0123 Fax:+1-*-***-***-**** www.telesat.com

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2395125 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - TNOC CRTC 2015-134 Telesat Responses to RFI_Cover Letter.pdf
Tele sat.
File No. 8663-C12-2015503186
July 14, 2015
Mr. John Traversy
Secretary General
Canadian Radio-television and
Telecommunications Commission
Ottawa, Ontario
*** ***

Subject: Telecom Notice of Consultation CRTC 2015-134, Review of basictelecommunications services (TNOC 2015-134) - Requests for Information**** Mr. Traversy,

On May 7, 2015 Telesat received requests for information from the Commission pursuant toparagraph 39 of Telecom Notice of Consultation 2015-134. In its letter the Commissionindicated that telecommunications service providers (TSPs) identified in the associateddistribution list are to file responses to the questions by 30 **** 2015, which was subsequentlyrevised to 14 July 2015. The Commission further noted that a response of "not applicable"should be indicated if the information requested in a specific question does not apply.

Telesat's responses to the request for information are attached. However, Telesat notes thatnone of the requests for information apply to its current activities and, accordingly, "notapplicable" is indicated in each of its responses.

Yours truly,
[Original Signed by Ian ****]
Ian ****
Executive Director,
Government and Regulatory Affairs
***End of Document*

1601 Telesat ****, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada *** ***Automated: +1-*-***-***-**** Tel: +1-613-74B-0123 Fax:+1-*-***-***-**** www.telesat.com

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2395125 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - TNOC CRTC 2015-134 Telesat Responses to RFI_Cover Letter.pdf
Tele sat.
File No. 8663-C12-2015503186
July 14, 2015
Mr. John Traversy
Secretary General
Canadian Radio-television and
Telecommunications Commission
Ottawa, Ontario
*** ***

Subject: Telecom Notice of Consultation CRTC 2015-134, Review of basictelecommunications services (TNOC 2015-134) - Requests for Information**** Mr. Traversy,

On May 7, 2015 Telesat received requests for information from the Commission pursuant toparagraph 39 of Telecom Notice of Consultation 2015-134. In its letter the Commissionindicated that telecommunications service providers (TSPs) identified in the associateddistribution list are to file responses to the questions by 30 **** 2015, which was subsequentlyrevised to 14 July 2015. The Commission further noted that a response of "not applicable"should be indicated if the information requested in a specific question does not apply.

Telesat's responses to the request for information are attached. However, Telesat notes thatnone of the requests for information apply to its current activities and, accordingly, "notapplicable" is indicated in each of its responses.

Yours truly,
[Original Signed by Ian ****]
Ian ****
Executive Director,
Government and Regulatory Affairs
***End of Document*

1601 Telesat ****, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada *** ***Automated: +1-*-***-***-**** Tel: +1-613-74B-0123 Fax:+1-*-***-***-**** www.telesat.com

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2395692 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - TELUS_CRTC_7May15-7 ABRIDGED.pdf
TELUS Communications Company
July 14, 2015
ABRIDGED Response to Request for
Information
TNC 2015-134
TELUS(CRTC)7May15-7
**** 1 of 10

7. For each category of telecommunications service (i.e. wireline voice, mobile wireless voice, wireline Internet, mobile wireless Internet, fixed wireless Internet and satellite Internet) provided by your company, identify and describe what service offerings (e.g.

discounted plans, special pricing) or initiatives (e.g. bill management tools, toll denial) are available to assist certain segments of the population for which access or affordability may be a concern, such as seniors, low income Canadians, people with disabilities, and students. Describe any other similar offerings or initiatives that are available to other specific segments of the population. Provide for the year 2014, the number and percentage of customers who used these offerings or initiatives.

Answer

TELUS is filing certain information related to customer subscription of service offerings and initiatives available to assist certain segments of the population including seniors, low income Canadians, persons with disabilities and students in this interrogatory response in confidence with the Commission pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act and Rule 32 of Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission Rules of Practice and Procedure. The information for which confidentiality is being claimed is sensitive commercial information regarding number and percentage of TELUS’ customers subscribing to specific programs or initiatives available to groups such as seniors, low income Canadians, persons with disabilities and students. Disclosure of this information to the company’s competitors would prejudice TELUS’ competitive position by giving them insight into customers’ subscription causing direct commercial harm to TELUS. This information is consistently treated as confidential by TELUS. TELUS asks that these data not be disclosed on the public record of this proceeding. An abridged copy of this interrogatory response is being provided for the public record.

As requested by the Commission, TELUS is describing in the following sections the offers that are available to TELUS’ customers for which access or affordability may be a concern, including seniors, low income Canadians, people with disabilities, and students.

Where available, TELUS provides the number of TELUS’ customers who subscribed to these offerings or initiatives for the year 2014.

However, TELUS is only able to provide percentages of customers using a particular offering or initiative as a percentage of its total wireline or wireless customers. These percentages are not representative of the true uptake as these percentages do not provide the actual percentages of the specific targeted consumer segments that use the services.

TELUS Communications Company
July 14, 2015
ABRIDGED Response to Request for
Information
TNC 2015-134
TELUS(CRTC)7May15-7
**** 2 of 10

Service Offerings and Initiatives for Wireline Services Wireline Voice

**** Management Tools

Customers can manage their expenses associated with their telecommunications services by making use of bill management tools, which target low-income households. These bill management tools provide customers with control over certain services such as long distance services.

**** management tools, for wireline voice services, include a toll-restrict option which allows customers to block, at no charge, outbound long distance calls, including 900/976 services, and inbound collect calls. Customers can also have request to have directory assistance blocked. In December 2014, together these programs have # # subscriptions, representing approximatively # #% of TELUS’ total residential customers. Low-income households may also choose an instalment payment plan that allows residential customers to spread connection service charges over a period of up to six months.

Vacation Disconnect

TELUS offers a temporary disconnection of service. The Vacation Disconnect program is a temporary plan that allows residential customers to lower their monthly charges if they will not require the service for a period of time up to six months. In 2014, # # customers subscribed to this program, representing approximately # #% of TELUS’ total number of residential customers.

Message Relay Service (“MRS”)

TELUS offers both teletypewriter (“TTY”) relay service,1

which is a traditional text-

based relay service, and the recently introduced Internet Protocol relay service2

(“IP

Relay”) that allows deaf and hard-of-hearing individuals to place and receive calls from their personal computers and/or mobile devices.

TELUS relay service offers Voice Carry Over (“VCO”) if the relay user can speak clearly but must use a TTY to see what the other person is saying. VCO allows users to speak for themselves, while the relay operator types what the person says to them. TELUS relay service also offers Hearing Carry Over (“HCO”) if the relay user can hear but must use a TTY to type what he or she needs to say. HCO allows users to hear for themselves, while the relay operator speaks for them by reading what is typed to the other person.

1

Since 1955, see Telecom Decision CRTC 85-29.

2

TELUS launched its IP-Relay service in October 2010.

TELUS Communications Company
July 14, 2015
ABRIDGED Response to Request for
Information
TNC 2015-134
TELUS(CRTC)7May15-7
**** 3 of 10

There is no charge to eligible TELUS customers for using TELUS relay service to place local calls. **** distance calls originating in Quebec, Alberta or British Columbia that are placed through TELUS relay service are charged one-half of the toll rate per minute or fraction thereof on calls terminating in Canada. TELUS customers can subscribe to a TELUS **** Distance plan to receive a discount on calls terminating in the US or overseas. **** Distance calls placed through TELUS relay services may be billed to a calling card, collect or to a third number.

The total number of TELUS registered IP-Relay users as of December 2014 is # #, representing # #% of TELUS’ total number of residential customers. As TELUS indicated in its answer to a Commission request for information on MRS, as part of the follow-up to Video relay service, Telecom Regulatory Policy CRTC 2014-187 (“TRP 2014-187”) filed on **** 30 2014, it is impossible for TELUS to report on the number of its TTY users, because there has never been any requirement for a TTY user to register before using TTY MRS. This service is based on legacy technology, and the Company is not aware of any technical way to link a user to a given TTY device. Also, there would be marginal benefit to link a user to a wireline phone number because TTY users can occasionally bring their TTY device with them and connect it on any other customer’s wireline service, independently of the underlying wireline service provider.

In 2013, TELUS participated in Issues related to the feasibility of establishing a video relay service, Telecom Notice of Consultation CRTC 2013-155. In this proceeding, TELUS advocated for the implementation of video relay services, a superior form of relay services that improves the accessibility of voice telecommunications for deaf, speech impaired and hearing impaired customers who communicate using sign language. As a result of that proceeding, the CRTC issued Video relay service, Telecom Regulatory Policy CRTC 2014-187, in **** 2014 in which it determined that video relay services should be implemented in Canada. TELUS is currently participating in the implementation of this important accessibility service and will contribute to the funding for this national program.

Directory Assistance

Customers who are unable to use the directory because they have an impairment, the existence of which has been certified by an organization, physician, or other individual acceptable to the Company, can apply for a Directory Assistance charge exemption. This exemption applies to Local Directory Assistance and to LD Directory Assistance for numbers within Canada and the US.

In addition, TELUS’ MRS users may request a phone number from TELUS Directory Assistance. This service is available nationally, free of charge, to TELUS’ registered special-needs customers.

TELUS Communications Company
July 14, 2015
ABRIDGED Response to Request for
Information
TNC 2015-134
TELUS(CRTC)7May15-7
**** 4 of 10

The total number of users registered to TELUS Directory Assistance charge exemption as of December 2014 is # #, representing # #% of TELUS’ total number of residential customers.

Payphones

TTY pay telephones are located throughout TELUS’ incumbent serving territories.

Information in Alternative formats

TELUS’ visually impaired customers may choose to receive documents in alternate formats such as large print or Braille (grade 1). The following information is provided upon request at no charge by TELUS in alternative formats to persons with visual impairment, upon request:

3
 Billing statements

 How to register to the National Do Not Call **** ("DNCL") and how to make a complaint to the Commission. This information is also available in TELUS' residential directories and on TELUS' websites  Information about **** Management Tools ("BMTs") – these include instalment payment plan for residential customers and toll restriction service. This information is also available in TELUS' residential directories  Retail Quality of Service ("QoS") information; the existence of QoS indicators with the reference to the CRTC's website along with a statement that this regime may vary depending of the customer's service provider and location is available in TELUS' residential directories

 Notice about the removal of a payphone
 Communications plans on local forbearance

 Information on the limitations of enhanced 911 service for customers with Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) telephone service  Information on dialing plan changes

The total number of users registered to receive information in alternative formats as of December 2014 is # #, representing # #% of TELUS’ total number of residential customers.

3

See Telecom Decision CRTC 2002-13, Broadcasting and Telecom Regulatory Policy CRTC 2009-430, Telecom Regulatory Policy CRTC 2010-132.

TELUS Communications Company
July 14, 2015
ABRIDGED Response to Request for
Information
TNC 2015-134
TELUS(CRTC)7May15-7
**** 5 of 10

Service Offerings and Initiatives for Wireless Services Mobile Wireless Voice

Affordable Wireless Plans

TELUS provides several affordable plan options. Specifically, for its postpaid wireless services, plans start as low as $30 per month (non-discounted). As for prepaid wireless services, the Koodo brand offers a plan at $15 per month, and the TELUS brand for $20.

TELUS also offers a data plan for $20 per month. For more information regarding these plans, including number and percentage of customers’ subscription, please, see responses to questions TELUS(CRTC)7May15-1b) for postpaid plans, and TELUS(CRTC)7May15-2 for prepaid plans.

Program for New Immigrants

TELUS provides a credit policy program for new immigrants, allowing recently arrived immigrants to activate service with TELUS even if they have no credit history or Canadian identification. New immigrants with Canadian government-issued landing papers can activate postpaid devices with TELUS. In 2014, # # customers took advantage of this service, representing # #% of the TELUS’ total number of wireless customers.

Vacation Disconnect:

For vacationers and military personnel on deployment, TELUS offers a temporary disconnection of service. The Vacation Disconnect program is a temporary rate plan that allows customers to lower their monthly charges if they will not require the service for a period of time up to six months. In 2014, # # customers subscribed to this program, representing # #% of TELUS’ total number of wireless customers.

Service Plans

Customers using prepaid wireless services from TELUS and Koodo have the opportunity to select a service plan that does not include any voice minute usage. These plans are useful for customers who are deaf or have severe hearing limitations for which voice communications are not possible or not useful. For example, TELUS offers an a la carte prepaid plan that includes unlimited text, picture and video messaging in Canada and in the US, unlimited international text and incoming messages and 100 MB of data for 30 days for $20

4
.
Wireless Devices:
4

http://www.telus.com/en/bc/mobility/prepaid/plans/?INTCMP=Beta_PrepaidLanding_HeroCTA_SeePlans.

http://www.telus.com/en/bc/mobility/prepaid/plans/?INTCMP=Beta_PrepaidLanding_HeroCTA_SeePlansTELUS Communications Company

July 14, 2015
ABRIDGED Response to Request for
Information
TNC 2015-134
TELUS(CRTC)7May15-7
**** 6 of 10

In TELUS’ response filed dated February 28, 2014 the follow-up process to Broadcasting and Telecom Regulatory Policy CRTC 2009-430, Accessibility of telecommunications and broadcasting services and in TELUS’ Wireless Code report on accessibility, TELUS indicated that it offers a broad range of wireless handsets that provide different service features, many of which might appeal to customers who have special needs.

TELUS makes available a wide range of wireless handsets and software applications for Apple, BlackBerry, Android and Windows devices. These capabilities already include many accessibility features embedded directly in the wireless handset by the handset manufacturer or are easily obtainable from a software application. In addition, prior to the launch of its HSPA and LTE networks, TELUS invested significant time and development effort to ensure that these applications would be fully functional on its wireless networks and easily used by its customers.

Since 2013, TELUS regularly examines the accessibility features of the wireless handsets that it offers to customers. TELUS has requested a total of three external audits that analyzed the newest of its most popular wireless devices. These audits concluded that smartphones contain features that increase accessibility to wireless services by persons with disabilities. These features include audible, visual, and vibration alerts and notifications, tactilely discernible keypads, hearing aid compatibility, teletypewriter (“TTY”) support, predictive text, auto answer with hands-free, voice activated dialing, speakerphone, Bluetooth headset compatibility, speed dialing and many other features.

A list of mobile handsets is available on TELUS’ website in the Accessibility section.

5
It

includes the brands and models offered by TELUS and the features that provide increased access for persons with various types of disabilities.

Procurement Process for New Wireless Devices

As part of the Company’s process for every new device launch, TELUS requests that original equipment manufacturers (“OEMs”) to identify what accessibility features each of their devices supports. TELUS reviews on a regular basis the mobile handsets in its inventory in order to ensure that they meet the highest possible level of accessibility. In addition, a list of mobile handsets is available on TELUS’ website6

in the newly updated
Accessibility section.
7

It includes the brands and models offered by TELUS and the features that provide improved access for persons with disabilities.

5

http://www.telus.com/get-help/accessibility/phone-and-features/accessibility-features-and-mobile-devices/support.do?topic=&subtopic.

6

http://www.telus.com/get-help/accessibility/phone-and-features/accessibility-features-and-mobile-devices/support.do?topic=&subtopic.

7

http://www.telus.com/en/bc/get-help/accessibility/topic.do.

http://www.telus.com/get-help/accessibility/phone-and-features/accessibility-features-and-mobile-devices/support.do?topic=&subtopichttp://www.telus.com/get-help/accessibility/phone-and-features/accessibility-features-and-mobile-devices/support.do?topic=&subtopichttp://www.telus.com/get-help/accessibility/phone-and-features/accessibility-features-and-mobile-devices/support.do?topic=&subtopichttp://www.telus.com/get-help/accessibility/phone-and-features/accessibility-features-and-mobile-devices/support.do?topic=&subtopichttp://www.telus.com/en/bc/get-help/accessibility/topic.doTELUS Communications Company

July 14, 2015
ABRIDGED Response to Request for
Information
TNC 2015-134
TELUS(CRTC)7May15-7
**** 7 of 10
TELUS’ Learning Centres

TELUS provides customized after-sale service to its wireless customers through its TELUS’ Learning Centres

8

available in stores across the country. Conducted by TELUS experts, these one-to-one or group sessions help customers maximise the benefits from their devices and plans. While these learning sessions are available to all TELUS customers, persons with special needs can use the opportunity to focus on the specific features in a smartphone that increase accessibility of wireless communications, depending the customer’s specific needs. Through these customized sessions, customers can get more knowledge on:

 The basics (using email, voice mail. explaining the first bill, etc.);

 Multimedia (taking photos, videos and listening to music);

 Bluetooth® setup;
 Backing up a smartphone;

 Social media (browsing the web, Facebook and Twitter);

 Applications (downloading and use in apps on every operating system);

 Increasing productivity (optimizing calendar, notepad and alarms); and  Advanced device features.

To book a session, customers can simply register online. If they require assistance in registering, the TELUS call centre agents are trained to assist customers in booking a session at the location of their choice. Usually, the duration of a learning session is sixty minutes. However, customers can book more than one session if they wish. In 2014, TELUS continued to increase the number of Learning Centres available to its wireless customers.

Alternative Formats

TELUS’ visually impaired customers may choose to receive documents in alternative formats such as large print or in Braille (grade 1). The following information is provided by TELUS in alternative formats to persons with visuals impairments, upon request:

 billing statements;
 contracts; and
8

http://mobility.telus.com/en/ON/Learning-Centre/.

http://mobility.telus.com/en/ON/Learning-Centre/TELUS Communications Company

July 14, 2015
ABRIDGED Response to Request for
Information
TNC 2015-134
TELUS(CRTC)7May15-7
**** 8 of 10

 any information required by the Commission.

The number of wireless users registered to receive information in alternative formats as of December 2014 is included in the number provided in the “Information in Alternative Formats” under the “Service Offerings and Initiatives for Wireline Services” section above.

Directory Assistance Charge Exemption for Wireless Customers:

To apply for the directory assistance exemption and/or billing in alternate formats, customers may fill out a form that is available online on the Company’s website section dedicated to accessibility

9
or from a customer service representative.

The number of wireless users registered to TELUS Directory Assistance charge exemption as of December 2014 is included in the number provided in total for the “Information in Alternative Formats” under the “Service Offerings and Initiatives for Wireline Services” section above.

Text-to-911
Pursuant to a Commission decision
10
issued in 2013, TELULS has made the changes

required on its network, systems and processes in its wireless operations so that TELUS’ wireless network supports the delivery of T911 service for wireless customers from the deaf, deafened, hard-of-hearing or speech impaired community. TELUS stands ready to perform its responsibilities related to this service in any area in Canada, once the serving public safety answering points (“PSAPs”) have been upgraded.

The total number of eligible users registered to text-to-911 as of December 2014 is # # users, which represents # #% of TELUS’ total number of wireless customers.

Wireless Internet
**** Tool Management for Data Usage

Although available to TELUS’ entire wireless customer base, this tool will be of interest to low-income customers. Customers can monitor their usage and avoid excessive bills.

TELUS will send usage notifications at 75%, 85% and 100% to customers to better track usage, and customers will be able to adjust their usage accordingly. In 2014, # # customers took advantage of this service, it represented close to # #% of TELUS’ total number of wireless customers.

9

http://www.telus.com/get-help/accessibility/topic.do.

http://www.telus.com/get-help/accessibility/topic.doTELUS Communications Company

July 14, 2015
ABRIDGED Response to Request for
Information
TNC 2015-134
TELUS(CRTC)7May15-7
**** 9 of 10
Data Block

Whether using a smartphone, tablet or mobile Internet key, TELUS will block data services and notify customers when they reach $50 in pay-per-use data charges per line in a given month. In 2014, # # customers subscribed to this program, representing # #% of TELUS’ total number of wireless customers.

Other Initiatives:

TELUS’ website and TELUS’ Website Section dedicated to Accessibility TELUS is continuously improving the overall accessibility of its websites in compliance with the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines.

TELUS is totally rebuilding its website as part of its Customer First commitment. This rebuild began with a one-year consultation process with TELUS’ customers and employees, launching an exclusive beta version of the new telus.com website, in order to provide an exceptional client experience to support TELUS’ becoming the most recommended company in the markets it serves. The latest objective of that initiative was reached with the migration of the new telusmobility.com website into the new telus.com website, allowing the offering of a new unified digital experience through a single site.

As part of this process, TELUS re-launched the Accessibility portion of its website dedicated to provide information on products and services that allow increased access to telecommunication for persons with various types of disabilities. This website section has been updated on a regular basis since its re-launch to ensure that relevant information is displayed to customers with special needs in a user-friendly, accessible manner. The website provides online information regarding special-needs wireline and wireless services offered by the Company. It also contains useful information such as a list of wireless handsets that include features providing increased access to wireless services for persons with different disabilities, step-by-step instructions describing how to use many of TELUS’ special needs services, and contact information to seek clarification or assistance relative to TELUS’ service offerings. It also provides information on special tariff exemptions for 411 services, as well as the possibility of receiving information in alternative formats and how to register in order to receive these special services. TELUS has incorporated an easy-to-find home page link to the Accessibility section of its website. This website section is regularly updated to continually improve accessibility.

The above-mentioned website improvements were undertaken to ensure that every page of TELUS’ website meets the W3C guidelines, level A and several level AA standards.

TELUS uses the information obtained in its ongoing consultations with advocacy groups to determine how it could further develop its service offerings to improve the accessibility of its wireless services for people with disabilities.

TELUS Communications Company
July 14, 2015
ABRIDGED Response to Request for
Information
TNC 2015-134
TELUS(CRTC)7May15-7
**** 10 of 10

In addition, TELUS continues its work with the Accessibility Committee of the Canadian Wireless Telecommunications Association (“CWTA”).

11
For example, face-to-face

meetings were held in 2014 between members of the CWTA and advocacy groups representing persons with disabilities.

TELUS Learning Centres

Finally, in support of TELUS’ efforts to improve the client experience and TELUS’ commitment to diversity and inclusiveness, the Company has taken other steps to improve the ways it serves its customers with disabilities.

In 2011, TELUS introduced an “accessible customer service policy12

”. Pursuant to this
internal policy, TELUS:

 welcomes customers who are accompanied by a service animal or support person to TELUS’ public locations;

 familiarizes TELUS team members on the use of wheelchairs, screen readers, listening devices, canes or other assistive devices that may be used by customers to access our stores, products and services;

 documents and shares its accessibility plans with customers and team members;

 listens to its customers’ feedback and takes appropriate action to continuously improve TELUS’ service; and

 enables customers with certain disabilities to apply for exemptions from directory assistance charges and to receive their TELUS bill and various documents in alternate formats.

*** End of document ***
11
http://wirelessaccessibility.ca/.
12

http://about.telus.com/community/english/about_us/for_our_customers/accessibility_at_telus.

http://wirelessaccessibility.ca/

http://about.telus.com/community/english/about_us/for_our_customers/accessibility_at_telus

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2395692 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - TELUS_CRTC_7May15-7 ABRIDGED.pdf
TELUS Communications Company
July 14, 2015
ABRIDGED Response to Request for
Information
TNC 2015-134
TELUS(CRTC)7May15-7
**** 1 of 10

7. For each category of telecommunications service (i.e. wireline voice, mobile wireless voice, wireline Internet, mobile wireless Internet, fixed wireless Internet and satellite Internet) provided by your company, identify and describe what service offerings (e.g.

discounted plans, special pricing) or initiatives (e.g. bill management tools, toll denial) are available to assist certain segments of the population for which access or affordability may be a concern, such as seniors, low income Canadians, people with disabilities, and students. Describe any other similar offerings or initiatives that are available to other specific segments of the population. Provide for the year 2014, the number and percentage of customers who used these offerings or initiatives.

Answer

TELUS is filing certain information related to customer subscription of service offerings and initiatives available to assist certain segments of the population including seniors, low income Canadians, persons with disabilities and students in this interrogatory response in confidence with the Commission pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act and Rule 32 of Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission Rules of Practice and Procedure. The information for which confidentiality is being claimed is sensitive commercial information regarding number and percentage of TELUS’ customers subscribing to specific programs or initiatives available to groups such as seniors, low income Canadians, persons with disabilities and students. Disclosure of this information to the company’s competitors would prejudice TELUS’ competitive position by giving them insight into customers’ subscription causing direct commercial harm to TELUS. This information is consistently treated as confidential by TELUS. TELUS asks that these data not be disclosed on the public record of this proceeding. An abridged copy of this interrogatory response is being provided for the public record.

As requested by the Commission, TELUS is describing in the following sections the offers that are available to TELUS’ customers for which access or affordability may be a concern, including seniors, low income Canadians, people with disabilities, and students.

Where available, TELUS provides the number of TELUS’ customers who subscribed to these offerings or initiatives for the year 2014.

However, TELUS is only able to provide percentages of customers using a particular offering or initiative as a percentage of its total wireline or wireless customers. These percentages are not representative of the true uptake as these percentages do not provide the actual percentages of the specific targeted consumer segments that use the services.

TELUS Communications Company
July 14, 2015
ABRIDGED Response to Request for
Information
TNC 2015-134
TELUS(CRTC)7May15-7
**** 2 of 10

Service Offerings and Initiatives for Wireline Services Wireline Voice

**** Management Tools

Customers can manage their expenses associated with their telecommunications services by making use of bill management tools, which target low-income households. These bill management tools provide customers with control over certain services such as long distance services.

**** management tools, for wireline voice services, include a toll-restrict option which allows customers to block, at no charge, outbound long distance calls, including 900/976 services, and inbound collect calls. Customers can also have request to have directory assistance blocked. In December 2014, together these programs have # # subscriptions, representing approximatively # #% of TELUS’ total residential customers. Low-income households may also choose an instalment payment plan that allows residential customers to spread connection service charges over a period of up to six months.

Vacation Disconnect

TELUS offers a temporary disconnection of service. The Vacation Disconnect program is a temporary plan that allows residential customers to lower their monthly charges if they will not require the service for a period of time up to six months. In 2014, # # customers subscribed to this program, representing approximately # #% of TELUS’ total number of residential customers.

Message Relay Service (“MRS”)

TELUS offers both teletypewriter (“TTY”) relay service,1

which is a traditional text-

based relay service, and the recently introduced Internet Protocol relay service2

(“IP

Relay”) that allows deaf and hard-of-hearing individuals to place and receive calls from their personal computers and/or mobile devices.

TELUS relay service offers Voice Carry Over (“VCO”) if the relay user can speak clearly but must use a TTY to see what the other person is saying. VCO allows users to speak for themselves, while the relay operator types what the person says to them. TELUS relay service also offers Hearing Carry Over (“HCO”) if the relay user can hear but must use a TTY to type what he or she needs to say. HCO allows users to hear for themselves, while the relay operator speaks for them by reading what is typed to the other person.

1

Since 1955, see Telecom Decision CRTC 85-29.

2

TELUS launched its IP-Relay service in October 2010.

TELUS Communications Company
July 14, 2015
ABRIDGED Response to Request for
Information
TNC 2015-134
TELUS(CRTC)7May15-7
**** 3 of 10

There is no charge to eligible TELUS customers for using TELUS relay service to place local calls. **** distance calls originating in Quebec, Alberta or British Columbia that are placed through TELUS relay service are charged one-half of the toll rate per minute or fraction thereof on calls terminating in Canada. TELUS customers can subscribe to a TELUS **** Distance plan to receive a discount on calls terminating in the US or overseas. **** Distance calls placed through TELUS relay services may be billed to a calling card, collect or to a third number.

The total number of TELUS registered IP-Relay users as of December 2014 is # #, representing # #% of TELUS’ total number of residential customers. As TELUS indicated in its answer to a Commission request for information on MRS, as part of the follow-up to Video relay service, Telecom Regulatory Policy CRTC 2014-187 (“TRP 2014-187”) filed on **** 30 2014, it is impossible for TELUS to report on the number of its TTY users, because there has never been any requirement for a TTY user to register before using TTY MRS. This service is based on legacy technology, and the Company is not aware of any technical way to link a user to a given TTY device. Also, there would be marginal benefit to link a user to a wireline phone number because TTY users can occasionally bring their TTY device with them and connect it on any other customer’s wireline service, independently of the underlying wireline service provider.

In 2013, TELUS participated in Issues related to the feasibility of establishing a video relay service, Telecom Notice of Consultation CRTC 2013-155. In this proceeding, TELUS advocated for the implementation of video relay services, a superior form of relay services that improves the accessibility of voice telecommunications for deaf, speech impaired and hearing impaired customers who communicate using sign language. As a result of that proceeding, the CRTC issued Video relay service, Telecom Regulatory Policy CRTC 2014-187, in **** 2014 in which it determined that video relay services should be implemented in Canada. TELUS is currently participating in the implementation of this important accessibility service and will contribute to the funding for this national program.

Directory Assistance

Customers who are unable to use the directory because they have an impairment, the existence of which has been certified by an organization, physician, or other individual acceptable to the Company, can apply for a Directory Assistance charge exemption. This exemption applies to Local Directory Assistance and to LD Directory Assistance for numbers within Canada and the US.

In addition, TELUS’ MRS users may request a phone number from TELUS Directory Assistance. This service is available nationally, free of charge, to TELUS’ registered special-needs customers.

TELUS Communications Company
July 14, 2015
ABRIDGED Response to Request for
Information
TNC 2015-134
TELUS(CRTC)7May15-7
**** 4 of 10

The total number of users registered to TELUS Directory Assistance charge exemption as of December 2014 is # #, representing # #% of TELUS’ total number of residential customers.

Payphones

TTY pay telephones are located throughout TELUS’ incumbent serving territories.

Information in Alternative formats

TELUS’ visually impaired customers may choose to receive documents in alternate formats such as large print or Braille (grade 1). The following information is provided upon request at no charge by TELUS in alternative formats to persons with visual impairment, upon request:

3
 Billing statements

 How to register to the National Do Not Call **** ("DNCL") and how to make a complaint to the Commission. This information is also available in TELUS' residential directories and on TELUS' websites  Information about **** Management Tools ("BMTs") – these include instalment payment plan for residential customers and toll restriction service. This information is also available in TELUS' residential directories  Retail Quality of Service ("QoS") information; the existence of QoS indicators with the reference to the CRTC's website along with a statement that this regime may vary depending of the customer's service provider and location is available in TELUS' residential directories

 Notice about the removal of a payphone
 Communications plans on local forbearance

 Information on the limitations of enhanced 911 service for customers with Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) telephone service  Information on dialing plan changes

The total number of users registered to receive information in alternative formats as of December 2014 is # #, representing # #% of TELUS’ total number of residential customers.

3

See Telecom Decision CRTC 2002-13, Broadcasting and Telecom Regulatory Policy CRTC 2009-430, Telecom Regulatory Policy CRTC 2010-132.

TELUS Communications Company
July 14, 2015
ABRIDGED Response to Request for
Information
TNC 2015-134
TELUS(CRTC)7May15-7
**** 5 of 10

Service Offerings and Initiatives for Wireless Services Mobile Wireless Voice

Affordable Wireless Plans

TELUS provides several affordable plan options. Specifically, for its postpaid wireless services, plans start as low as $30 per month (non-discounted). As for prepaid wireless services, the Koodo brand offers a plan at $15 per month, and the TELUS brand for $20.

TELUS also offers a data plan for $20 per month. For more information regarding these plans, including number and percentage of customers’ subscription, please, see responses to questions TELUS(CRTC)7May15-1b) for postpaid plans, and TELUS(CRTC)7May15-2 for prepaid plans.

Program for New Immigrants

TELUS provides a credit policy program for new immigrants, allowing recently arrived immigrants to activate service with TELUS even if they have no credit history or Canadian identification. New immigrants with Canadian government-issued landing papers can activate postpaid devices with TELUS. In 2014, # # customers took advantage of this service, representing # #% of the TELUS’ total number of wireless customers.

Vacation Disconnect:

For vacationers and military personnel on deployment, TELUS offers a temporary disconnection of service. The Vacation Disconnect program is a temporary rate plan that allows customers to lower their monthly charges if they will not require the service for a period of time up to six months. In 2014, # # customers subscribed to this program, representing # #% of TELUS’ total number of wireless customers.

Service Plans

Customers using prepaid wireless services from TELUS and Koodo have the opportunity to select a service plan that does not include any voice minute usage. These plans are useful for customers who are deaf or have severe hearing limitations for which voice communications are not possible or not useful. For example, TELUS offers an a la carte prepaid plan that includes unlimited text, picture and video messaging in Canada and in the US, unlimited international text and incoming messages and 100 MB of data for 30 days for $20

4
.
Wireless Devices:
4

http://www.telus.com/en/bc/mobility/prepaid/plans/?INTCMP=Beta_PrepaidLanding_HeroCTA_SeePlans.

http://www.telus.com/en/bc/mobility/prepaid/plans/?INTCMP=Beta_PrepaidLanding_HeroCTA_SeePlansTELUS Communications Company

July 14, 2015
ABRIDGED Response to Request for
Information
TNC 2015-134
TELUS(CRTC)7May15-7
**** 6 of 10

In TELUS’ response filed dated February 28, 2014 the follow-up process to Broadcasting and Telecom Regulatory Policy CRTC 2009-430, Accessibility of telecommunications and broadcasting services and in TELUS’ Wireless Code report on accessibility, TELUS indicated that it offers a broad range of wireless handsets that provide different service features, many of which might appeal to customers who have special needs.

TELUS makes available a wide range of wireless handsets and software applications for Apple, BlackBerry, Android and Windows devices. These capabilities already include many accessibility features embedded directly in the wireless handset by the handset manufacturer or are easily obtainable from a software application. In addition, prior to the launch of its HSPA and LTE networks, TELUS invested significant time and development effort to ensure that these applications would be fully functional on its wireless networks and easily used by its customers.

Since 2013, TELUS regularly examines the accessibility features of the wireless handsets that it offers to customers. TELUS has requested a total of three external audits that analyzed the newest of its most popular wireless devices. These audits concluded that smartphones contain features that increase accessibility to wireless services by persons with disabilities. These features include audible, visual, and vibration alerts and notifications, tactilely discernible keypads, hearing aid compatibility, teletypewriter (“TTY”) support, predictive text, auto answer with hands-free, voice activated dialing, speakerphone, Bluetooth headset compatibility, speed dialing and many other features.

A list of mobile handsets is available on TELUS’ website in the Accessibility section.

5
It

includes the brands and models offered by TELUS and the features that provide increased access for persons with various types of disabilities.

Procurement Process for New Wireless Devices

As part of the Company’s process for every new device launch, TELUS requests that original equipment manufacturers (“OEMs”) to identify what accessibility features each of their devices supports. TELUS reviews on a regular basis the mobile handsets in its inventory in order to ensure that they meet the highest possible level of accessibility. In addition, a list of mobile handsets is available on TELUS’ website6

in the newly updated
Accessibility section.
7

It includes the brands and models offered by TELUS and the features that provide improved access for persons with disabilities.

5

http://www.telus.com/get-help/accessibility/phone-and-features/accessibility-features-and-mobile-devices/support.do?topic=&subtopic.

6

http://www.telus.com/get-help/accessibility/phone-and-features/accessibility-features-and-mobile-devices/support.do?topic=&subtopic.

7

http://www.telus.com/en/bc/get-help/accessibility/topic.do.

http://www.telus.com/get-help/accessibility/phone-and-features/accessibility-features-and-mobile-devices/support.do?topic=&subtopichttp://www.telus.com/get-help/accessibility/phone-and-features/accessibility-features-and-mobile-devices/support.do?topic=&subtopichttp://www.telus.com/get-help/accessibility/phone-and-features/accessibility-features-and-mobile-devices/support.do?topic=&subtopichttp://www.telus.com/get-help/accessibility/phone-and-features/accessibility-features-and-mobile-devices/support.do?topic=&subtopichttp://www.telus.com/en/bc/get-help/accessibility/topic.doTELUS Communications Company

July 14, 2015
ABRIDGED Response to Request for
Information
TNC 2015-134
TELUS(CRTC)7May15-7
**** 7 of 10
TELUS’ Learning Centres

TELUS provides customized after-sale service to its wireless customers through its TELUS’ Learning Centres

8

available in stores across the country. Conducted by TELUS experts, these one-to-one or group sessions help customers maximise the benefits from their devices and plans. While these learning sessions are available to all TELUS customers, persons with special needs can use the opportunity to focus on the specific features in a smartphone that increase accessibility of wireless communications, depending the customer’s specific needs. Through these customized sessions, customers can get more knowledge on:

 The basics (using email, voice mail. explaining the first bill, etc.);

 Multimedia (taking photos, videos and listening to music);

 Bluetooth® setup;
 Backing up a smartphone;

 Social media (browsing the web, Facebook and Twitter);

 Applications (downloading and use in apps on every operating system);

 Increasing productivity (optimizing calendar, notepad and alarms); and  Advanced device features.

To book a session, customers can simply register online. If they require assistance in registering, the TELUS call centre agents are trained to assist customers in booking a session at the location of their choice. Usually, the duration of a learning session is sixty minutes. However, customers can book more than one session if they wish. In 2014, TELUS continued to increase the number of Learning Centres available to its wireless customers.

Alternative Formats

TELUS’ visually impaired customers may choose to receive documents in alternative formats such as large print or in Braille (grade 1). The following information is provided by TELUS in alternative formats to persons with visuals impairments, upon request:

 billing statements;
 contracts; and
8

http://mobility.telus.com/en/ON/Learning-Centre/.

http://mobility.telus.com/en/ON/Learning-Centre/TELUS Communications Company

July 14, 2015
ABRIDGED Response to Request for
Information
TNC 2015-134
TELUS(CRTC)7May15-7
**** 8 of 10

 any information required by the Commission.

The number of wireless users registered to receive information in alternative formats as of December 2014 is included in the number provided in the “Information in Alternative Formats” under the “Service Offerings and Initiatives for Wireline Services” section above.

Directory Assistance Charge Exemption for Wireless Customers:

To apply for the directory assistance exemption and/or billing in alternate formats, customers may fill out a form that is available online on the Company’s website section dedicated to accessibility

9
or from a customer service representative.

The number of wireless users registered to TELUS Directory Assistance charge exemption as of December 2014 is included in the number provided in total for the “Information in Alternative Formats” under the “Service Offerings and Initiatives for Wireline Services” section above.

Text-to-911
Pursuant to a Commission decision
10
issued in 2013, TELULS has made the changes

required on its network, systems and processes in its wireless operations so that TELUS’ wireless network supports the delivery of T911 service for wireless customers from the deaf, deafened, hard-of-hearing or speech impaired community. TELUS stands ready to perform its responsibilities related to this service in any area in Canada, once the serving public safety answering points (“PSAPs”) have been upgraded.

The total number of eligible users registered to text-to-911 as of December 2014 is # # users, which represents # #% of TELUS’ total number of wireless customers.

Wireless Internet
**** Tool Management for Data Usage

Although available to TELUS’ entire wireless customer base, this tool will be of interest to low-income customers. Customers can monitor their usage and avoid excessive bills.

TELUS will send usage notifications at 75%, 85% and 100% to customers to better track usage, and customers will be able to adjust their usage accordingly. In 2014, # # customers took advantage of this service, it represented close to # #% of TELUS’ total number of wireless customers.

9

http://www.telus.com/get-help/accessibility/topic.do.

http://www.telus.com/get-help/accessibility/topic.doTELUS Communications Company

July 14, 2015
ABRIDGED Response to Request for
Information
TNC 2015-134
TELUS(CRTC)7May15-7
**** 9 of 10
Data Block

Whether using a smartphone, tablet or mobile Internet key, TELUS will block data services and notify customers when they reach $50 in pay-per-use data charges per line in a given month. In 2014, # # customers subscribed to this program, representing # #% of TELUS’ total number of wireless customers.

Other Initiatives:

TELUS’ website and TELUS’ Website Section dedicated to Accessibility TELUS is continuously improving the overall accessibility of its websites in compliance with the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines.

TELUS is totally rebuilding its website as part of its Customer First commitment. This rebuild began with a one-year consultation process with TELUS’ customers and employees, launching an exclusive beta version of the new telus.com website, in order to provide an exceptional client experience to support TELUS’ becoming the most recommended company in the markets it serves. The latest objective of that initiative was reached with the migration of the new telusmobility.com website into the new telus.com website, allowing the offering of a new unified digital experience through a single site.

As part of this process, TELUS re-launched the Accessibility portion of its website dedicated to provide information on products and services that allow increased access to telecommunication for persons with various types of disabilities. This website section has been updated on a regular basis since its re-launch to ensure that relevant information is displayed to customers with special needs in a user-friendly, accessible manner. The website provides online information regarding special-needs wireline and wireless services offered by the Company. It also contains useful information such as a list of wireless handsets that include features providing increased access to wireless services for persons with different disabilities, step-by-step instructions describing how to use many of TELUS’ special needs services, and contact information to seek clarification or assistance relative to TELUS’ service offerings. It also provides information on special tariff exemptions for 411 services, as well as the possibility of receiving information in alternative formats and how to register in order to receive these special services. TELUS has incorporated an easy-to-find home page link to the Accessibility section of its website. This website section is regularly updated to continually improve accessibility.

The above-mentioned website improvements were undertaken to ensure that every page of TELUS’ website meets the W3C guidelines, level A and several level AA standards.

TELUS uses the information obtained in its ongoing consultations with advocacy groups to determine how it could further develop its service offerings to improve the accessibility of its wireless services for people with disabilities.

TELUS Communications Company
July 14, 2015
ABRIDGED Response to Request for
Information
TNC 2015-134
TELUS(CRTC)7May15-7
**** 10 of 10

In addition, TELUS continues its work with the Accessibility Committee of the Canadian Wireless Telecommunications Association (“CWTA”).

11
For example, face-to-face

meetings were held in 2014 between members of the CWTA and advocacy groups representing persons with disabilities.

TELUS Learning Centres

Finally, in support of TELUS’ efforts to improve the client experience and TELUS’ commitment to diversity and inclusiveness, the Company has taken other steps to improve the ways it serves its customers with disabilities.

In 2011, TELUS introduced an “accessible customer service policy12

”. Pursuant to this
internal policy, TELUS:

 welcomes customers who are accompanied by a service animal or support person to TELUS’ public locations;

 familiarizes TELUS team members on the use of wheelchairs, screen readers, listening devices, canes or other assistive devices that may be used by customers to access our stores, products and services;

 documents and shares its accessibility plans with customers and team members;

 listens to its customers’ feedback and takes appropriate action to continuously improve TELUS’ service; and

 enables customers with certain disabilities to apply for exemptions from directory assistance charges and to receive their TELUS bill and various documents in alternate formats.

*** End of document ***
11
http://wirelessaccessibility.ca/.
12

http://about.telus.com/community/english/about_us/for_our_customers/accessibility_at_telus.

http://wirelessaccessibility.ca/

http://about.telus.com/community/english/about_us/for_our_customers/accessibility_at_telus

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2395692 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - TELUS_CRTC_7May15-7 ABRIDGED.pdf
TELUS Communications Company
July 14, 2015
ABRIDGED Response to Request for
Information
TNC 2015-134
TELUS(CRTC)7May15-7
**** 1 of 10

7. For each category of telecommunications service (i.e. wireline voice, mobile wireless voice, wireline Internet, mobile wireless Internet, fixed wireless Internet and satellite Internet) provided by your company, identify and describe what service offerings (e.g.

discounted plans, special pricing) or initiatives (e.g. bill management tools, toll denial) are available to assist certain segments of the population for which access or affordability may be a concern, such as seniors, low income Canadians, people with disabilities, and students. Describe any other similar offerings or initiatives that are available to other specific segments of the population. Provide for the year 2014, the number and percentage of customers who used these offerings or initiatives.

Answer

TELUS is filing certain information related to customer subscription of service offerings and initiatives available to assist certain segments of the population including seniors, low income Canadians, persons with disabilities and students in this interrogatory response in confidence with the Commission pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act and Rule 32 of Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission Rules of Practice and Procedure. The information for which confidentiality is being claimed is sensitive commercial information regarding number and percentage of TELUS’ customers subscribing to specific programs or initiatives available to groups such as seniors, low income Canadians, persons with disabilities and students. Disclosure of this information to the company’s competitors would prejudice TELUS’ competitive position by giving them insight into customers’ subscription causing direct commercial harm to TELUS. This information is consistently treated as confidential by TELUS. TELUS asks that these data not be disclosed on the public record of this proceeding. An abridged copy of this interrogatory response is being provided for the public record.

As requested by the Commission, TELUS is describing in the following sections the offers that are available to TELUS’ customers for which access or affordability may be a concern, including seniors, low income Canadians, people with disabilities, and students.

Where available, TELUS provides the number of TELUS’ customers who subscribed to these offerings or initiatives for the year 2014.

However, TELUS is only able to provide percentages of customers using a particular offering or initiative as a percentage of its total wireline or wireless customers. These percentages are not representative of the true uptake as these percentages do not provide the actual percentages of the specific targeted consumer segments that use the services.

TELUS Communications Company
July 14, 2015
ABRIDGED Response to Request for
Information
TNC 2015-134
TELUS(CRTC)7May15-7
**** 2 of 10

Service Offerings and Initiatives for Wireline Services Wireline Voice

**** Management Tools

Customers can manage their expenses associated with their telecommunications services by making use of bill management tools, which target low-income households. These bill management tools provide customers with control over certain services such as long distance services.

**** management tools, for wireline voice services, include a toll-restrict option which allows customers to block, at no charge, outbound long distance calls, including 900/976 services, and inbound collect calls. Customers can also have request to have directory assistance blocked. In December 2014, together these programs have # # subscriptions, representing approximatively # #% of TELUS’ total residential customers. Low-income households may also choose an instalment payment plan that allows residential customers to spread connection service charges over a period of up to six months.

Vacation Disconnect

TELUS offers a temporary disconnection of service. The Vacation Disconnect program is a temporary plan that allows residential customers to lower their monthly charges if they will not require the service for a period of time up to six months. In 2014, # # customers subscribed to this program, representing approximately # #% of TELUS’ total number of residential customers.

Message Relay Service (“MRS”)

TELUS offers both teletypewriter (“TTY”) relay service,1

which is a traditional text-

based relay service, and the recently introduced Internet Protocol relay service2

(“IP

Relay”) that allows deaf and hard-of-hearing individuals to place and receive calls from their personal computers and/or mobile devices.

TELUS relay service offers Voice Carry Over (“VCO”) if the relay user can speak clearly but must use a TTY to see what the other person is saying. VCO allows users to speak for themselves, while the relay operator types what the person says to them. TELUS relay service also offers Hearing Carry Over (“HCO”) if the relay user can hear but must use a TTY to type what he or she needs to say. HCO allows users to hear for themselves, while the relay operator speaks for them by reading what is typed to the other person.

1

Since 1955, see Telecom Decision CRTC 85-29.

2

TELUS launched its IP-Relay service in October 2010.

TELUS Communications Company
July 14, 2015
ABRIDGED Response to Request for
Information
TNC 2015-134
TELUS(CRTC)7May15-7
**** 3 of 10

There is no charge to eligible TELUS customers for using TELUS relay service to place local calls. **** distance calls originating in Quebec, Alberta or British Columbia that are placed through TELUS relay service are charged one-half of the toll rate per minute or fraction thereof on calls terminating in Canada. TELUS customers can subscribe to a TELUS **** Distance plan to receive a discount on calls terminating in the US or overseas. **** Distance calls placed through TELUS relay services may be billed to a calling card, collect or to a third number.

The total number of TELUS registered IP-Relay users as of December 2014 is # #, representing # #% of TELUS’ total number of residential customers. As TELUS indicated in its answer to a Commission request for information on MRS, as part of the follow-up to Video relay service, Telecom Regulatory Policy CRTC 2014-187 (“TRP 2014-187”) filed on **** 30 2014, it is impossible for TELUS to report on the number of its TTY users, because there has never been any requirement for a TTY user to register before using TTY MRS. This service is based on legacy technology, and the Company is not aware of any technical way to link a user to a given TTY device. Also, there would be marginal benefit to link a user to a wireline phone number because TTY users can occasionally bring their TTY device with them and connect it on any other customer’s wireline service, independently of the underlying wireline service provider.

In 2013, TELUS participated in Issues related to the feasibility of establishing a video relay service, Telecom Notice of Consultation CRTC 2013-155. In this proceeding, TELUS advocated for the implementation of video relay services, a superior form of relay services that improves the accessibility of voice telecommunications for deaf, speech impaired and hearing impaired customers who communicate using sign language. As a result of that proceeding, the CRTC issued Video relay service, Telecom Regulatory Policy CRTC 2014-187, in **** 2014 in which it determined that video relay services should be implemented in Canada. TELUS is currently participating in the implementation of this important accessibility service and will contribute to the funding for this national program.

Directory Assistance

Customers who are unable to use the directory because they have an impairment, the existence of which has been certified by an organization, physician, or other individual acceptable to the Company, can apply for a Directory Assistance charge exemption. This exemption applies to Local Directory Assistance and to LD Directory Assistance for numbers within Canada and the US.

In addition, TELUS’ MRS users may request a phone number from TELUS Directory Assistance. This service is available nationally, free of charge, to TELUS’ registered special-needs customers.

TELUS Communications Company
July 14, 2015
ABRIDGED Response to Request for
Information
TNC 2015-134
TELUS(CRTC)7May15-7
**** 4 of 10

The total number of users registered to TELUS Directory Assistance charge exemption as of December 2014 is # #, representing # #% of TELUS’ total number of residential customers.

Payphones

TTY pay telephones are located throughout TELUS’ incumbent serving territories.

Information in Alternative formats

TELUS’ visually impaired customers may choose to receive documents in alternate formats such as large print or Braille (grade 1). The following information is provided upon request at no charge by TELUS in alternative formats to persons with visual impairment, upon request:

3
 Billing statements

 How to register to the National Do Not Call **** ("DNCL") and how to make a complaint to the Commission. This information is also available in TELUS' residential directories and on TELUS' websites  Information about **** Management Tools ("BMTs") – these include instalment payment plan for residential customers and toll restriction service. This information is also available in TELUS' residential directories  Retail Quality of Service ("QoS") information; the existence of QoS indicators with the reference to the CRTC's website along with a statement that this regime may vary depending of the customer's service provider and location is available in TELUS' residential directories

 Notice about the removal of a payphone
 Communications plans on local forbearance

 Information on the limitations of enhanced 911 service for customers with Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) telephone service  Information on dialing plan changes

The total number of users registered to receive information in alternative formats as of December 2014 is # #, representing # #% of TELUS’ total number of residential customers.

3

See Telecom Decision CRTC 2002-13, Broadcasting and Telecom Regulatory Policy CRTC 2009-430, Telecom Regulatory Policy CRTC 2010-132.

TELUS Communications Company
July 14, 2015
ABRIDGED Response to Request for
Information
TNC 2015-134
TELUS(CRTC)7May15-7
**** 5 of 10

Service Offerings and Initiatives for Wireless Services Mobile Wireless Voice

Affordable Wireless Plans

TELUS provides several affordable plan options. Specifically, for its postpaid wireless services, plans start as low as $30 per month (non-discounted). As for prepaid wireless services, the Koodo brand offers a plan at $15 per month, and the TELUS brand for $20.

TELUS also offers a data plan for $20 per month. For more information regarding these plans, including number and percentage of customers’ subscription, please, see responses to questions TELUS(CRTC)7May15-1b) for postpaid plans, and TELUS(CRTC)7May15-2 for prepaid plans.

Program for New Immigrants

TELUS provides a credit policy program for new immigrants, allowing recently arrived immigrants to activate service with TELUS even if they have no credit history or Canadian identification. New immigrants with Canadian government-issued landing papers can activate postpaid devices with TELUS. In 2014, # # customers took advantage of this service, representing # #% of the TELUS’ total number of wireless customers.

Vacation Disconnect:

For vacationers and military personnel on deployment, TELUS offers a temporary disconnection of service. The Vacation Disconnect program is a temporary rate plan that allows customers to lower their monthly charges if they will not require the service for a period of time up to six months. In 2014, # # customers subscribed to this program, representing # #% of TELUS’ total number of wireless customers.

Service Plans

Customers using prepaid wireless services from TELUS and Koodo have the opportunity to select a service plan that does not include any voice minute usage. These plans are useful for customers who are deaf or have severe hearing limitations for which voice communications are not possible or not useful. For example, TELUS offers an a la carte prepaid plan that includes unlimited text, picture and video messaging in Canada and in the US, unlimited international text and incoming messages and 100 MB of data for 30 days for $20

4
.
Wireless Devices:
4

http://www.telus.com/en/bc/mobility/prepaid/plans/?INTCMP=Beta_PrepaidLanding_HeroCTA_SeePlans.

http://www.telus.com/en/bc/mobility/prepaid/plans/?INTCMP=Beta_PrepaidLanding_HeroCTA_SeePlansTELUS Communications Company

July 14, 2015
ABRIDGED Response to Request for
Information
TNC 2015-134
TELUS(CRTC)7May15-7
**** 6 of 10

In TELUS’ response filed dated February 28, 2014 the follow-up process to Broadcasting and Telecom Regulatory Policy CRTC 2009-430, Accessibility of telecommunications and broadcasting services and in TELUS’ Wireless Code report on accessibility, TELUS indicated that it offers a broad range of wireless handsets that provide different service features, many of which might appeal to customers who have special needs.

TELUS makes available a wide range of wireless handsets and software applications for Apple, BlackBerry, Android and Windows devices. These capabilities already include many accessibility features embedded directly in the wireless handset by the handset manufacturer or are easily obtainable from a software application. In addition, prior to the launch of its HSPA and LTE networks, TELUS invested significant time and development effort to ensure that these applications would be fully functional on its wireless networks and easily used by its customers.

Since 2013, TELUS regularly examines the accessibility features of the wireless handsets that it offers to customers. TELUS has requested a total of three external audits that analyzed the newest of its most popular wireless devices. These audits concluded that smartphones contain features that increase accessibility to wireless services by persons with disabilities. These features include audible, visual, and vibration alerts and notifications, tactilely discernible keypads, hearing aid compatibility, teletypewriter (“TTY”) support, predictive text, auto answer with hands-free, voice activated dialing, speakerphone, Bluetooth headset compatibility, speed dialing and many other features.

A list of mobile handsets is available on TELUS’ website in the Accessibility section.

5
It

includes the brands and models offered by TELUS and the features that provide increased access for persons with various types of disabilities.

Procurement Process for New Wireless Devices

As part of the Company’s process for every new device launch, TELUS requests that original equipment manufacturers (“OEMs”) to identify what accessibility features each of their devices supports. TELUS reviews on a regular basis the mobile handsets in its inventory in order to ensure that they meet the highest possible level of accessibility. In addition, a list of mobile handsets is available on TELUS’ website6

in the newly updated
Accessibility section.
7

It includes the brands and models offered by TELUS and the features that provide improved access for persons with disabilities.

5

http://www.telus.com/get-help/accessibility/phone-and-features/accessibility-features-and-mobile-devices/support.do?topic=&subtopic.

6

http://www.telus.com/get-help/accessibility/phone-and-features/accessibility-features-and-mobile-devices/support.do?topic=&subtopic.

7

http://www.telus.com/en/bc/get-help/accessibility/topic.do.

http://www.telus.com/get-help/accessibility/phone-and-features/accessibility-features-and-mobile-devices/support.do?topic=&subtopichttp://www.telus.com/get-help/accessibility/phone-and-features/accessibility-features-and-mobile-devices/support.do?topic=&subtopichttp://www.telus.com/get-help/accessibility/phone-and-features/accessibility-features-and-mobile-devices/support.do?topic=&subtopichttp://www.telus.com/get-help/accessibility/phone-and-features/accessibility-features-and-mobile-devices/support.do?topic=&subtopichttp://www.telus.com/en/bc/get-help/accessibility/topic.doTELUS Communications Company

July 14, 2015
ABRIDGED Response to Request for
Information
TNC 2015-134
TELUS(CRTC)7May15-7
**** 7 of 10
TELUS’ Learning Centres

TELUS provides customized after-sale service to its wireless customers through its TELUS’ Learning Centres

8

available in stores across the country. Conducted by TELUS experts, these one-to-one or group sessions help customers maximise the benefits from their devices and plans. While these learning sessions are available to all TELUS customers, persons with special needs can use the opportunity to focus on the specific features in a smartphone that increase accessibility of wireless communications, depending the customer’s specific needs. Through these customized sessions, customers can get more knowledge on:

 The basics (using email, voice mail. explaining the first bill, etc.);

 Multimedia (taking photos, videos and listening to music);

 Bluetooth® setup;
 Backing up a smartphone;

 Social media (browsing the web, Facebook and Twitter);

 Applications (downloading and use in apps on every operating system);

 Increasing productivity (optimizing calendar, notepad and alarms); and  Advanced device features.

To book a session, customers can simply register online. If they require assistance in registering, the TELUS call centre agents are trained to assist customers in booking a session at the location of their choice. Usually, the duration of a learning session is sixty minutes. However, customers can book more than one session if they wish. In 2014, TELUS continued to increase the number of Learning Centres available to its wireless customers.

Alternative Formats

TELUS’ visually impaired customers may choose to receive documents in alternative formats such as large print or in Braille (grade 1). The following information is provided by TELUS in alternative formats to persons with visuals impairments, upon request:

 billing statements;
 contracts; and
8

http://mobility.telus.com/en/ON/Learning-Centre/.

http://mobility.telus.com/en/ON/Learning-Centre/TELUS Communications Company

July 14, 2015
ABRIDGED Response to Request for
Information
TNC 2015-134
TELUS(CRTC)7May15-7
**** 8 of 10

 any information required by the Commission.

The number of wireless users registered to receive information in alternative formats as of December 2014 is included in the number provided in the “Information in Alternative Formats” under the “Service Offerings and Initiatives for Wireline Services” section above.

Directory Assistance Charge Exemption for Wireless Customers:

To apply for the directory assistance exemption and/or billing in alternate formats, customers may fill out a form that is available online on the Company’s website section dedicated to accessibility

9
or from a customer service representative.

The number of wireless users registered to TELUS Directory Assistance charge exemption as of December 2014 is included in the number provided in total for the “Information in Alternative Formats” under the “Service Offerings and Initiatives for Wireline Services” section above.

Text-to-911
Pursuant to a Commission decision
10
issued in 2013, TELULS has made the changes

required on its network, systems and processes in its wireless operations so that TELUS’ wireless network supports the delivery of T911 service for wireless customers from the deaf, deafened, hard-of-hearing or speech impaired community. TELUS stands ready to perform its responsibilities related to this service in any area in Canada, once the serving public safety answering points (“PSAPs”) have been upgraded.

The total number of eligible users registered to text-to-911 as of December 2014 is # # users, which represents # #% of TELUS’ total number of wireless customers.

Wireless Internet
**** Tool Management for Data Usage

Although available to TELUS’ entire wireless customer base, this tool will be of interest to low-income customers. Customers can monitor their usage and avoid excessive bills.

TELUS will send usage notifications at 75%, 85% and 100% to customers to better track usage, and customers will be able to adjust their usage accordingly. In 2014, # # customers took advantage of this service, it represented close to # #% of TELUS’ total number of wireless customers.

9

http://www.telus.com/get-help/accessibility/topic.do.

http://www.telus.com/get-help/accessibility/topic.doTELUS Communications Company

July 14, 2015
ABRIDGED Response to Request for
Information
TNC 2015-134
TELUS(CRTC)7May15-7
**** 9 of 10
Data Block

Whether using a smartphone, tablet or mobile Internet key, TELUS will block data services and notify customers when they reach $50 in pay-per-use data charges per line in a given month. In 2014, # # customers subscribed to this program, representing # #% of TELUS’ total number of wireless customers.

Other Initiatives:

TELUS’ website and TELUS’ Website Section dedicated to Accessibility TELUS is continuously improving the overall accessibility of its websites in compliance with the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines.

TELUS is totally rebuilding its website as part of its Customer First commitment. This rebuild began with a one-year consultation process with TELUS’ customers and employees, launching an exclusive beta version of the new telus.com website, in order to provide an exceptional client experience to support TELUS’ becoming the most recommended company in the markets it serves. The latest objective of that initiative was reached with the migration of the new telusmobility.com website into the new telus.com website, allowing the offering of a new unified digital experience through a single site.

As part of this process, TELUS re-launched the Accessibility portion of its website dedicated to provide information on products and services that allow increased access to telecommunication for persons with various types of disabilities. This website section has been updated on a regular basis since its re-launch to ensure that relevant information is displayed to customers with special needs in a user-friendly, accessible manner. The website provides online information regarding special-needs wireline and wireless services offered by the Company. It also contains useful information such as a list of wireless handsets that include features providing increased access to wireless services for persons with different disabilities, step-by-step instructions describing how to use many of TELUS’ special needs services, and contact information to seek clarification or assistance relative to TELUS’ service offerings. It also provides information on special tariff exemptions for 411 services, as well as the possibility of receiving information in alternative formats and how to register in order to receive these special services. TELUS has incorporated an easy-to-find home page link to the Accessibility section of its website. This website section is regularly updated to continually improve accessibility.

The above-mentioned website improvements were undertaken to ensure that every page of TELUS’ website meets the W3C guidelines, level A and several level AA standards.

TELUS uses the information obtained in its ongoing consultations with advocacy groups to determine how it could further develop its service offerings to improve the accessibility of its wireless services for people with disabilities.

TELUS Communications Company
July 14, 2015
ABRIDGED Response to Request for
Information
TNC 2015-134
TELUS(CRTC)7May15-7
**** 10 of 10

In addition, TELUS continues its work with the Accessibility Committee of the Canadian Wireless Telecommunications Association (“CWTA”).

11
For example, face-to-face

meetings were held in 2014 between members of the CWTA and advocacy groups representing persons with disabilities.

TELUS Learning Centres

Finally, in support of TELUS’ efforts to improve the client experience and TELUS’ commitment to diversity and inclusiveness, the Company has taken other steps to improve the ways it serves its customers with disabilities.

In 2011, TELUS introduced an “accessible customer service policy12

”. Pursuant to this
internal policy, TELUS:

 welcomes customers who are accompanied by a service animal or support person to TELUS’ public locations;

 familiarizes TELUS team members on the use of wheelchairs, screen readers, listening devices, canes or other assistive devices that may be used by customers to access our stores, products and services;

 documents and shares its accessibility plans with customers and team members;

 listens to its customers’ feedback and takes appropriate action to continuously improve TELUS’ service; and

 enables customers with certain disabilities to apply for exemptions from directory assistance charges and to receive their TELUS bill and various documents in alternate formats.

*** End of document ***
11
http://wirelessaccessibility.ca/.
12

http://about.telus.com/community/english/about_us/for_our_customers/accessibility_at_telus.

http://wirelessaccessibility.ca/

http://about.telus.com/community/english/about_us/for_our_customers/accessibility_at_telus

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2395692 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - TELUS_CRTC_7May15-7 ABRIDGED.pdf
TELUS Communications Company
July 14, 2015
ABRIDGED Response to Request for
Information
TNC 2015-134
TELUS(CRTC)7May15-7
**** 1 of 10

7. For each category of telecommunications service (i.e. wireline voice, mobile wireless voice, wireline Internet, mobile wireless Internet, fixed wireless Internet and satellite Internet) provided by your company, identify and describe what service offerings (e.g.

discounted plans, special pricing) or initiatives (e.g. bill management tools, toll denial) are available to assist certain segments of the population for which access or affordability may be a concern, such as seniors, low income Canadians, people with disabilities, and students. Describe any other similar offerings or initiatives that are available to other specific segments of the population. Provide for the year 2014, the number and percentage of customers who used these offerings or initiatives.

Answer

TELUS is filing certain information related to customer subscription of service offerings and initiatives available to assist certain segments of the population including seniors, low income Canadians, persons with disabilities and students in this interrogatory response in confidence with the Commission pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act and Rule 32 of Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission Rules of Practice and Procedure. The information for which confidentiality is being claimed is sensitive commercial information regarding number and percentage of TELUS’ customers subscribing to specific programs or initiatives available to groups such as seniors, low income Canadians, persons with disabilities and students. Disclosure of this information to the company’s competitors would prejudice TELUS’ competitive position by giving them insight into customers’ subscription causing direct commercial harm to TELUS. This information is consistently treated as confidential by TELUS. TELUS asks that these data not be disclosed on the public record of this proceeding. An abridged copy of this interrogatory response is being provided for the public record.

As requested by the Commission, TELUS is describing in the following sections the offers that are available to TELUS’ customers for which access or affordability may be a concern, including seniors, low income Canadians, people with disabilities, and students.

Where available, TELUS provides the number of TELUS’ customers who subscribed to these offerings or initiatives for the year 2014.

However, TELUS is only able to provide percentages of customers using a particular offering or initiative as a percentage of its total wireline or wireless customers. These percentages are not representative of the true uptake as these percentages do not provide the actual percentages of the specific targeted consumer segments that use the services.

TELUS Communications Company
July 14, 2015
ABRIDGED Response to Request for
Information
TNC 2015-134
TELUS(CRTC)7May15-7
**** 2 of 10

Service Offerings and Initiatives for Wireline Services Wireline Voice

**** Management Tools

Customers can manage their expenses associated with their telecommunications services by making use of bill management tools, which target low-income households. These bill management tools provide customers with control over certain services such as long distance services.

**** management tools, for wireline voice services, include a toll-restrict option which allows customers to block, at no charge, outbound long distance calls, including 900/976 services, and inbound collect calls. Customers can also have request to have directory assistance blocked. In December 2014, together these programs have # # subscriptions, representing approximatively # #% of TELUS’ total residential customers. Low-income households may also choose an instalment payment plan that allows residential customers to spread connection service charges over a period of up to six months.

Vacation Disconnect

TELUS offers a temporary disconnection of service. The Vacation Disconnect program is a temporary plan that allows residential customers to lower their monthly charges if they will not require the service for a period of time up to six months. In 2014, # # customers subscribed to this program, representing approximately # #% of TELUS’ total number of residential customers.

Message Relay Service (“MRS”)

TELUS offers both teletypewriter (“TTY”) relay service,1

which is a traditional text-

based relay service, and the recently introduced Internet Protocol relay service2

(“IP

Relay”) that allows deaf and hard-of-hearing individuals to place and receive calls from their personal computers and/or mobile devices.

TELUS relay service offers Voice Carry Over (“VCO”) if the relay user can speak clearly but must use a TTY to see what the other person is saying. VCO allows users to speak for themselves, while the relay operator types what the person says to them. TELUS relay service also offers Hearing Carry Over (“HCO”) if the relay user can hear but must use a TTY to type what he or she needs to say. HCO allows users to hear for themselves, while the relay operator speaks for them by reading what is typed to the other person.

1

Since 1955, see Telecom Decision CRTC 85-29.

2

TELUS launched its IP-Relay service in October 2010.

TELUS Communications Company
July 14, 2015
ABRIDGED Response to Request for
Information
TNC 2015-134
TELUS(CRTC)7May15-7
**** 3 of 10

There is no charge to eligible TELUS customers for using TELUS relay service to place local calls. **** distance calls originating in Quebec, Alberta or British Columbia that are placed through TELUS relay service are charged one-half of the toll rate per minute or fraction thereof on calls terminating in Canada. TELUS customers can subscribe to a TELUS **** Distance plan to receive a discount on calls terminating in the US or overseas. **** Distance calls placed through TELUS relay services may be billed to a calling card, collect or to a third number.

The total number of TELUS registered IP-Relay users as of December 2014 is # #, representing # #% of TELUS’ total number of residential customers. As TELUS indicated in its answer to a Commission request for information on MRS, as part of the follow-up to Video relay service, Telecom Regulatory Policy CRTC 2014-187 (“TRP 2014-187”) filed on **** 30 2014, it is impossible for TELUS to report on the number of its TTY users, because there has never been any requirement for a TTY user to register before using TTY MRS. This service is based on legacy technology, and the Company is not aware of any technical way to link a user to a given TTY device. Also, there would be marginal benefit to link a user to a wireline phone number because TTY users can occasionally bring their TTY device with them and connect it on any other customer’s wireline service, independently of the underlying wireline service provider.

In 2013, TELUS participated in Issues related to the feasibility of establishing a video relay service, Telecom Notice of Consultation CRTC 2013-155. In this proceeding, TELUS advocated for the implementation of video relay services, a superior form of relay services that improves the accessibility of voice telecommunications for deaf, speech impaired and hearing impaired customers who communicate using sign language. As a result of that proceeding, the CRTC issued Video relay service, Telecom Regulatory Policy CRTC 2014-187, in **** 2014 in which it determined that video relay services should be implemented in Canada. TELUS is currently participating in the implementation of this important accessibility service and will contribute to the funding for this national program.

Directory Assistance

Customers who are unable to use the directory because they have an impairment, the existence of which has been certified by an organization, physician, or other individual acceptable to the Company, can apply for a Directory Assistance charge exemption. This exemption applies to Local Directory Assistance and to LD Directory Assistance for numbers within Canada and the US.

In addition, TELUS’ MRS users may request a phone number from TELUS Directory Assistance. This service is available nationally, free of charge, to TELUS’ registered special-needs customers.

TELUS Communications Company
July 14, 2015
ABRIDGED Response to Request for
Information
TNC 2015-134
TELUS(CRTC)7May15-7
**** 4 of 10

The total number of users registered to TELUS Directory Assistance charge exemption as of December 2014 is # #, representing # #% of TELUS’ total number of residential customers.

Payphones

TTY pay telephones are located throughout TELUS’ incumbent serving territories.

Information in Alternative formats

TELUS’ visually impaired customers may choose to receive documents in alternate formats such as large print or Braille (grade 1). The following information is provided upon request at no charge by TELUS in alternative formats to persons with visual impairment, upon request:

3
 Billing statements

 How to register to the National Do Not Call **** ("DNCL") and how to make a complaint to the Commission. This information is also available in TELUS' residential directories and on TELUS' websites  Information about **** Management Tools ("BMTs") – these include instalment payment plan for residential customers and toll restriction service. This information is also available in TELUS' residential directories  Retail Quality of Service ("QoS") information; the existence of QoS indicators with the reference to the CRTC's website along with a statement that this regime may vary depending of the customer's service provider and location is available in TELUS' residential directories

 Notice about the removal of a payphone
 Communications plans on local forbearance

 Information on the limitations of enhanced 911 service for customers with Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) telephone service  Information on dialing plan changes

The total number of users registered to receive information in alternative formats as of December 2014 is # #, representing # #% of TELUS’ total number of residential customers.

3

See Telecom Decision CRTC 2002-13, Broadcasting and Telecom Regulatory Policy CRTC 2009-430, Telecom Regulatory Policy CRTC 2010-132.

TELUS Communications Company
July 14, 2015
ABRIDGED Response to Request for
Information
TNC 2015-134
TELUS(CRTC)7May15-7
**** 5 of 10

Service Offerings and Initiatives for Wireless Services Mobile Wireless Voice

Affordable Wireless Plans

TELUS provides several affordable plan options. Specifically, for its postpaid wireless services, plans start as low as $30 per month (non-discounted). As for prepaid wireless services, the Koodo brand offers a plan at $15 per month, and the TELUS brand for $20.

TELUS also offers a data plan for $20 per month. For more information regarding these plans, including number and percentage of customers’ subscription, please, see responses to questions TELUS(CRTC)7May15-1b) for postpaid plans, and TELUS(CRTC)7May15-2 for prepaid plans.

Program for New Immigrants

TELUS provides a credit policy program for new immigrants, allowing recently arrived immigrants to activate service with TELUS even if they have no credit history or Canadian identification. New immigrants with Canadian government-issued landing papers can activate postpaid devices with TELUS. In 2014, # # customers took advantage of this service, representing # #% of the TELUS’ total number of wireless customers.

Vacation Disconnect:

For vacationers and military personnel on deployment, TELUS offers a temporary disconnection of service. The Vacation Disconnect program is a temporary rate plan that allows customers to lower their monthly charges if they will not require the service for a period of time up to six months. In 2014, # # customers subscribed to this program, representing # #% of TELUS’ total number of wireless customers.

Service Plans

Customers using prepaid wireless services from TELUS and Koodo have the opportunity to select a service plan that does not include any voice minute usage. These plans are useful for customers who are deaf or have severe hearing limitations for which voice communications are not possible or not useful. For example, TELUS offers an a la carte prepaid plan that includes unlimited text, picture and video messaging in Canada and in the US, unlimited international text and incoming messages and 100 MB of data for 30 days for $20

4
.
Wireless Devices:
4

http://www.telus.com/en/bc/mobility/prepaid/plans/?INTCMP=Beta_PrepaidLanding_HeroCTA_SeePlans.

http://www.telus.com/en/bc/mobility/prepaid/plans/?INTCMP=Beta_PrepaidLanding_HeroCTA_SeePlansTELUS Communications Company

July 14, 2015
ABRIDGED Response to Request for
Information
TNC 2015-134
TELUS(CRTC)7May15-7
**** 6 of 10

In TELUS’ response filed dated February 28, 2014 the follow-up process to Broadcasting and Telecom Regulatory Policy CRTC 2009-430, Accessibility of telecommunications and broadcasting services and in TELUS’ Wireless Code report on accessibility, TELUS indicated that it offers a broad range of wireless handsets that provide different service features, many of which might appeal to customers who have special needs.

TELUS makes available a wide range of wireless handsets and software applications for Apple, BlackBerry, Android and Windows devices. These capabilities already include many accessibility features embedded directly in the wireless handset by the handset manufacturer or are easily obtainable from a software application. In addition, prior to the launch of its HSPA and LTE networks, TELUS invested significant time and development effort to ensure that these applications would be fully functional on its wireless networks and easily used by its customers.

Since 2013, TELUS regularly examines the accessibility features of the wireless handsets that it offers to customers. TELUS has requested a total of three external audits that analyzed the newest of its most popular wireless devices. These audits concluded that smartphones contain features that increase accessibility to wireless services by persons with disabilities. These features include audible, visual, and vibration alerts and notifications, tactilely discernible keypads, hearing aid compatibility, teletypewriter (“TTY”) support, predictive text, auto answer with hands-free, voice activated dialing, speakerphone, Bluetooth headset compatibility, speed dialing and many other features.

A list of mobile handsets is available on TELUS’ website in the Accessibility section.

5
It

includes the brands and models offered by TELUS and the features that provide increased access for persons with various types of disabilities.

Procurement Process for New Wireless Devices

As part of the Company’s process for every new device launch, TELUS requests that original equipment manufacturers (“OEMs”) to identify what accessibility features each of their devices supports. TELUS reviews on a regular basis the mobile handsets in its inventory in order to ensure that they meet the highest possible level of accessibility. In addition, a list of mobile handsets is available on TELUS’ website6

in the newly updated
Accessibility section.
7

It includes the brands and models offered by TELUS and the features that provide improved access for persons with disabilities.

5

http://www.telus.com/get-help/accessibility/phone-and-features/accessibility-features-and-mobile-devices/support.do?topic=&subtopic.

6

http://www.telus.com/get-help/accessibility/phone-and-features/accessibility-features-and-mobile-devices/support.do?topic=&subtopic.

7

http://www.telus.com/en/bc/get-help/accessibility/topic.do.

http://www.telus.com/get-help/accessibility/phone-and-features/accessibility-features-and-mobile-devices/support.do?topic=&subtopichttp://www.telus.com/get-help/accessibility/phone-and-features/accessibility-features-and-mobile-devices/support.do?topic=&subtopichttp://www.telus.com/get-help/accessibility/phone-and-features/accessibility-features-and-mobile-devices/support.do?topic=&subtopichttp://www.telus.com/get-help/accessibility/phone-and-features/accessibility-features-and-mobile-devices/support.do?topic=&subtopichttp://www.telus.com/en/bc/get-help/accessibility/topic.doTELUS Communications Company

July 14, 2015
ABRIDGED Response to Request for
Information
TNC 2015-134
TELUS(CRTC)7May15-7
**** 7 of 10
TELUS’ Learning Centres

TELUS provides customized after-sale service to its wireless customers through its TELUS’ Learning Centres

8

available in stores across the country. Conducted by TELUS experts, these one-to-one or group sessions help customers maximise the benefits from their devices and plans. While these learning sessions are available to all TELUS customers, persons with special needs can use the opportunity to focus on the specific features in a smartphone that increase accessibility of wireless communications, depending the customer’s specific needs. Through these customized sessions, customers can get more knowledge on:

 The basics (using email, voice mail. explaining the first bill, etc.);

 Multimedia (taking photos, videos and listening to music);

 Bluetooth® setup;
 Backing up a smartphone;

 Social media (browsing the web, Facebook and Twitter);

 Applications (downloading and use in apps on every operating system);

 Increasing productivity (optimizing calendar, notepad and alarms); and  Advanced device features.

To book a session, customers can simply register online. If they require assistance in registering, the TELUS call centre agents are trained to assist customers in booking a session at the location of their choice. Usually, the duration of a learning session is sixty minutes. However, customers can book more than one session if they wish. In 2014, TELUS continued to increase the number of Learning Centres available to its wireless customers.

Alternative Formats

TELUS’ visually impaired customers may choose to receive documents in alternative formats such as large print or in Braille (grade 1). The following information is provided by TELUS in alternative formats to persons with visuals impairments, upon request:

 billing statements;
 contracts; and
8

http://mobility.telus.com/en/ON/Learning-Centre/.

http://mobility.telus.com/en/ON/Learning-Centre/TELUS Communications Company

July 14, 2015
ABRIDGED Response to Request for
Information
TNC 2015-134
TELUS(CRTC)7May15-7
**** 8 of 10

 any information required by the Commission.

The number of wireless users registered to receive information in alternative formats as of December 2014 is included in the number provided in the “Information in Alternative Formats” under the “Service Offerings and Initiatives for Wireline Services” section above.

Directory Assistance Charge Exemption for Wireless Customers:

To apply for the directory assistance exemption and/or billing in alternate formats, customers may fill out a form that is available online on the Company’s website section dedicated to accessibility

9
or from a customer service representative.

The number of wireless users registered to TELUS Directory Assistance charge exemption as of December 2014 is included in the number provided in total for the “Information in Alternative Formats” under the “Service Offerings and Initiatives for Wireline Services” section above.

Text-to-911
Pursuant to a Commission decision
10
issued in 2013, TELULS has made the changes

required on its network, systems and processes in its wireless operations so that TELUS’ wireless network supports the delivery of T911 service for wireless customers from the deaf, deafened, hard-of-hearing or speech impaired community. TELUS stands ready to perform its responsibilities related to this service in any area in Canada, once the serving public safety answering points (“PSAPs”) have been upgraded.

The total number of eligible users registered to text-to-911 as of December 2014 is # # users, which represents # #% of TELUS’ total number of wireless customers.

Wireless Internet
**** Tool Management for Data Usage

Although available to TELUS’ entire wireless customer base, this tool will be of interest to low-income customers. Customers can monitor their usage and avoid excessive bills.

TELUS will send usage notifications at 75%, 85% and 100% to customers to better track usage, and customers will be able to adjust their usage accordingly. In 2014, # # customers took advantage of this service, it represented close to # #% of TELUS’ total number of wireless customers.

9

http://www.telus.com/get-help/accessibility/topic.do.

http://www.telus.com/get-help/accessibility/topic.doTELUS Communications Company

July 14, 2015
ABRIDGED Response to Request for
Information
TNC 2015-134
TELUS(CRTC)7May15-7
**** 9 of 10
Data Block

Whether using a smartphone, tablet or mobile Internet key, TELUS will block data services and notify customers when they reach $50 in pay-per-use data charges per line in a given month. In 2014, # # customers subscribed to this program, representing # #% of TELUS’ total number of wireless customers.

Other Initiatives:

TELUS’ website and TELUS’ Website Section dedicated to Accessibility TELUS is continuously improving the overall accessibility of its websites in compliance with the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines.

TELUS is totally rebuilding its website as part of its Customer First commitment. This rebuild began with a one-year consultation process with TELUS’ customers and employees, launching an exclusive beta version of the new telus.com website, in order to provide an exceptional client experience to support TELUS’ becoming the most recommended company in the markets it serves. The latest objective of that initiative was reached with the migration of the new telusmobility.com website into the new telus.com website, allowing the offering of a new unified digital experience through a single site.

As part of this process, TELUS re-launched the Accessibility portion of its website dedicated to provide information on products and services that allow increased access to telecommunication for persons with various types of disabilities. This website section has been updated on a regular basis since its re-launch to ensure that relevant information is displayed to customers with special needs in a user-friendly, accessible manner. The website provides online information regarding special-needs wireline and wireless services offered by the Company. It also contains useful information such as a list of wireless handsets that include features providing increased access to wireless services for persons with different disabilities, step-by-step instructions describing how to use many of TELUS’ special needs services, and contact information to seek clarification or assistance relative to TELUS’ service offerings. It also provides information on special tariff exemptions for 411 services, as well as the possibility of receiving information in alternative formats and how to register in order to receive these special services. TELUS has incorporated an easy-to-find home page link to the Accessibility section of its website. This website section is regularly updated to continually improve accessibility.

The above-mentioned website improvements were undertaken to ensure that every page of TELUS’ website meets the W3C guidelines, level A and several level AA standards.

TELUS uses the information obtained in its ongoing consultations with advocacy groups to determine how it could further develop its service offerings to improve the accessibility of its wireless services for people with disabilities.

TELUS Communications Company
July 14, 2015
ABRIDGED Response to Request for
Information
TNC 2015-134
TELUS(CRTC)7May15-7
**** 10 of 10

In addition, TELUS continues its work with the Accessibility Committee of the Canadian Wireless Telecommunications Association (“CWTA”).

11
For example, face-to-face

meetings were held in 2014 between members of the CWTA and advocacy groups representing persons with disabilities.

TELUS Learning Centres

Finally, in support of TELUS’ efforts to improve the client experience and TELUS’ commitment to diversity and inclusiveness, the Company has taken other steps to improve the ways it serves its customers with disabilities.

In 2011, TELUS introduced an “accessible customer service policy12

”. Pursuant to this
internal policy, TELUS:

 welcomes customers who are accompanied by a service animal or support person to TELUS’ public locations;

 familiarizes TELUS team members on the use of wheelchairs, screen readers, listening devices, canes or other assistive devices that may be used by customers to access our stores, products and services;

 documents and shares its accessibility plans with customers and team members;

 listens to its customers’ feedback and takes appropriate action to continuously improve TELUS’ service; and

 enables customers with certain disabilities to apply for exemptions from directory assistance charges and to receive their TELUS bill and various documents in alternate formats.

*** End of document ***
11
http://wirelessaccessibility.ca/.
12

http://about.telus.com/community/english/about_us/for_our_customers/accessibility_at_telus.

http://wirelessaccessibility.ca/

http://about.telus.com/community/english/about_us/for_our_customers/accessibility_at_telus

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2395874 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - Ice_CRTC_6_ABRIDGED.pdf

ABRIDGED ICE WIRELESS RESPONSE TO INTERROGATORY 14 JULY 2015 ICE WIRELESS (CRTC) 6 ABRIDGED PAGE 1 OF 1

INFORMATION REQUESTED BY
THE CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION

[Wireline, mobile wireless, fixed wireless and/or satellite direct to home Internet service providers] Q: 6 Provide the monthly average usage of data [in gigabytes (GB)] for residential customers for the year 2014 for i) wireline Internet service, and ii) mobile wireless Internet service.

A: Below you may find the monthly average usage of data [in gigabytes (GB)] for residential customers for the year 2014 for mobile wireless Internet service.

#

Certain information contained in the response to this request for information is filed in confidence with the Commission pursuant to section 39 of the Act. The information in question is: (1) commercial information pertaining to the service offerings of Ice Wireless. Disclosure of this information could prejudice the competitive position of Ice Wireless and result in material loss, thereby causing specific direct harm. There is no discernible public benefit to the disclosure of the information in question.

Therefore, the public interest in disclosure does not outweigh the specific direct harm to Ice Wireless resulting from such disclosure.

***END OF DOCUMENT*** # filed in Confidence

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2395874 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - Ice_CRTC_6_ABRIDGED.pdf

ABRIDGED ICE WIRELESS RESPONSE TO INTERROGATORY 14 JULY 2015 ICE WIRELESS (CRTC) 6 ABRIDGED PAGE 1 OF 1

INFORMATION REQUESTED BY
THE CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION

[Wireline, mobile wireless, fixed wireless and/or satellite direct to home Internet service providers] Q: 6 Provide the monthly average usage of data [in gigabytes (GB)] for residential customers for the year 2014 for i) wireline Internet service, and ii) mobile wireless Internet service.

A: Below you may find the monthly average usage of data [in gigabytes (GB)] for residential customers for the year 2014 for mobile wireless Internet service.

#

Certain information contained in the response to this request for information is filed in confidence with the Commission pursuant to section 39 of the Act. The information in question is: (1) commercial information pertaining to the service offerings of Ice Wireless. Disclosure of this information could prejudice the competitive position of Ice Wireless and result in material loss, thereby causing specific direct harm. There is no discernible public benefit to the disclosure of the information in question.

Therefore, the public interest in disclosure does not outweigh the specific direct harm to Ice Wireless resulting from such disclosure.

***END OF DOCUMENT*** # filed in Confidence

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2395874 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - Ice_CRTC_6_ABRIDGED.pdf

ABRIDGED ICE WIRELESS RESPONSE TO INTERROGATORY 14 JULY 2015 ICE WIRELESS (CRTC) 6 ABRIDGED PAGE 1 OF 1

INFORMATION REQUESTED BY
THE CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION

[Wireline, mobile wireless, fixed wireless and/or satellite direct to home Internet service providers] Q: 6 Provide the monthly average usage of data [in gigabytes (GB)] for residential customers for the year 2014 for i) wireline Internet service, and ii) mobile wireless Internet service.

A: Below you may find the monthly average usage of data [in gigabytes (GB)] for residential customers for the year 2014 for mobile wireless Internet service.

#

Certain information contained in the response to this request for information is filed in confidence with the Commission pursuant to section 39 of the Act. The information in question is: (1) commercial information pertaining to the service offerings of Ice Wireless. Disclosure of this information could prejudice the competitive position of Ice Wireless and result in material loss, thereby causing specific direct harm. There is no discernible public benefit to the disclosure of the information in question.

Therefore, the public interest in disclosure does not outweigh the specific direct harm to Ice Wireless resulting from such disclosure.

***END OF DOCUMENT*** # filed in Confidence

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2395874 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - Ice_CRTC_6_ABRIDGED.pdf

ABRIDGED ICE WIRELESS RESPONSE TO INTERROGATORY 14 JULY 2015 ICE WIRELESS (CRTC) 6 ABRIDGED PAGE 1 OF 1

INFORMATION REQUESTED BY
THE CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION

[Wireline, mobile wireless, fixed wireless and/or satellite direct to home Internet service providers] Q: 6 Provide the monthly average usage of data [in gigabytes (GB)] for residential customers for the year 2014 for i) wireline Internet service, and ii) mobile wireless Internet service.

A: Below you may find the monthly average usage of data [in gigabytes (GB)] for residential customers for the year 2014 for mobile wireless Internet service.

#

Certain information contained in the response to this request for information is filed in confidence with the Commission pursuant to section 39 of the Act. The information in question is: (1) commercial information pertaining to the service offerings of Ice Wireless. Disclosure of this information could prejudice the competitive position of Ice Wireless and result in material loss, thereby causing specific direct harm. There is no discernible public benefit to the disclosure of the information in question.

Therefore, the public interest in disclosure does not outweigh the specific direct harm to Ice Wireless resulting from such disclosure.

***END OF DOCUMENT*** # filed in Confidence

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2390437 - 2015-134 - Réponses aux demandes de renseignements - Digicom Technologie Inc.html

Demande de renseignements : Information volontaire de la compagnie Digicom Technologies Inc.Demande de renseignements1. En ce qui concerne les réseaux ou les installations de télécommunication construits ou détenus par votre organisation, ou les services de télécommunication qu’elle offre, veuillez fournir les renseignements suivants : a. le type de réseau qui a été construit (p. ex., fixe, mobile) ainsi que la capacité offerte aux divers endroits (p. ex., les écoles, les points d’accès sans fil, chez les utilisateurs finals) et la technologie utilisée (p. ex., fibre, câble, ligne d’abonné numérique, mobile, satellite, Wi-Fi); - le réseau est sans-fil- les abonnés, résidentiels ou commerciaux, choisissent un forfait de 5 MB à 40 MB avec capacité de téléchargement de 20 Gig à Illimité.b. les vitesses du service à large bande offertes aux abonnés, et la méthode que vous utilisez pour établir que ces vitesses répondraient aux besoins des abonnés; - les vitesses sont de 5 MB à 40 MB et les abonnés désiraient avoir la même offre que dans les autres régionsc. le montant de l’investissement ainsi que le ou les modes de financement utilisés; - le coût a été de 3 M $, financé par le Programme communautés rurales branchées du Gouvernement du Québec, par les municipalités participantes et Digicom.d. les détails relatifs à tout partenariat établi avec d’autres organisations pour déployer le réseau; - sans objete. les raisons motivant votre décision de déployer un réseau à large bande; - la demande du millieuf. l’approche que vous préconisez quant à l’utilisation du réseau par les fournisseurs de services (le cas échéant), y compris : i. la ou les compagnies offrant le service de détail; - faire affaire avec des distributeurs locaux et régionauxii. une description de la méthode employée pour choisir le fournisseur de services de télécommunications (s’il y a un seul fournisseur de service). - inclut dans l’appel d’offres pour la construction du réseau2. Si des services de détail sont disponibles sur votre réseau, veuillez fournir les renseignements suivants : a. les types de services de télécommunication disponibles (p. ex., téléphonie filaire, téléphonie sans fil mobile, Internet filaire et Internet sans fil mobile) et le prix pour chaque offre de service, et fournissez une description des caractéristiques du service incluses dans chaque offre de service (p. ex., la vitesse, les limites d’utilisation de données, les minutes d’appel); - les abonnés, résidentiels ou commerciaux, choisissent un forfait de 5 MB à 40 MB avec capacité de téléchargement de 20 Gig à illimités- les forfaits varient de 50 $ à 100 $ par mois- la téléphonie IP est offerte pour 30 $ / mois avec messagerie et interurbain illimité au Canadab. les trois offres de détail les plus populaires pour chaque type de services indiqués en a) ci-dessus; - internet haute vitesse de base, vitesse accélérée et téléphoniec. dans le cas de chaque catégorie de services de télécommunication que vous fournissez (p. ex., téléphonie filaire, téléphonie sans fil mobile, Internet filaire et Internet sans fil mobile), une description des offres de service (p.ex., forfaits à prix réduit, prix spéciaux) ou des mesures (p. ex., outils de gestion de la facture, blocage de l’accès à l’interurbain) disponibles pour aider certains segments de la population pour qui l’accès ou le caractère abordable de cet accès peut constituer une source de préoccupation (p. ex., les personnes âgées, les Canadiens à faible revenu, les personnes handicapées, les étudiants). - Sans onbjet

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2390437 - 2015-134 - Réponses aux demandes de renseignements - Digicom Technologie Inc.html

Demande de renseignements : Information volontaire de la compagnie Digicom Technologies Inc.Demande de renseignements1. En ce qui concerne les réseaux ou les installations de télécommunication construits ou détenus par votre organisation, ou les services de télécommunication qu’elle offre, veuillez fournir les renseignements suivants : a. le type de réseau qui a été construit (p. ex., fixe, mobile) ainsi que la capacité offerte aux divers endroits (p. ex., les écoles, les points d’accès sans fil, chez les utilisateurs finals) et la technologie utilisée (p. ex., fibre, câble, ligne d’abonné numérique, mobile, satellite, Wi-Fi); - le réseau est sans-fil- les abonnés, résidentiels ou commerciaux, choisissent un forfait de 5 MB à 40 MB avec capacité de téléchargement de 20 Gig à Illimité.b. les vitesses du service à large bande offertes aux abonnés, et la méthode que vous utilisez pour établir que ces vitesses répondraient aux besoins des abonnés; - les vitesses sont de 5 MB à 40 MB et les abonnés désiraient avoir la même offre que dans les autres régionsc. le montant de l’investissement ainsi que le ou les modes de financement utilisés; - le coût a été de 3 M $, financé par le Programme communautés rurales branchées du Gouvernement du Québec, par les municipalités participantes et Digicom.d. les détails relatifs à tout partenariat établi avec d’autres organisations pour déployer le réseau; - sans objete. les raisons motivant votre décision de déployer un réseau à large bande; - la demande du millieuf. l’approche que vous préconisez quant à l’utilisation du réseau par les fournisseurs de services (le cas échéant), y compris : i. la ou les compagnies offrant le service de détail; - faire affaire avec des distributeurs locaux et régionauxii. une description de la méthode employée pour choisir le fournisseur de services de télécommunications (s’il y a un seul fournisseur de service). - inclut dans l’appel d’offres pour la construction du réseau2. Si des services de détail sont disponibles sur votre réseau, veuillez fournir les renseignements suivants : a. les types de services de télécommunication disponibles (p. ex., téléphonie filaire, téléphonie sans fil mobile, Internet filaire et Internet sans fil mobile) et le prix pour chaque offre de service, et fournissez une description des caractéristiques du service incluses dans chaque offre de service (p. ex., la vitesse, les limites d’utilisation de données, les minutes d’appel); - les abonnés, résidentiels ou commerciaux, choisissent un forfait de 5 MB à 40 MB avec capacité de téléchargement de 20 Gig à illimités- les forfaits varient de 50 $ à 100 $ par mois- la téléphonie IP est offerte pour 30 $ / mois avec messagerie et interurbain illimité au Canadab. les trois offres de détail les plus populaires pour chaque type de services indiqués en a) ci-dessus; - internet haute vitesse de base, vitesse accélérée et téléphoniec. dans le cas de chaque catégorie de services de télécommunication que vous fournissez (p. ex., téléphonie filaire, téléphonie sans fil mobile, Internet filaire et Internet sans fil mobile), une description des offres de service (p.ex., forfaits à prix réduit, prix spéciaux) ou des mesures (p. ex., outils de gestion de la facture, blocage de l’accès à l’interurbain) disponibles pour aider certains segments de la population pour qui l’accès ou le caractère abordable de cet accès peut constituer une source de préoccupation (p. ex., les personnes âgées, les Canadiens à faible revenu, les personnes handicapées, les étudiants). - Sans onbjet

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2390437 - 2015-134 - Réponses aux demandes de renseignements - Digicom Technologie Inc.html

Demande de renseignements : Information volontaire de la compagnie Digicom Technologies Inc.Demande de renseignements1. En ce qui concerne les réseaux ou les installations de télécommunication construits ou détenus par votre organisation, ou les services de télécommunication qu’elle offre, veuillez fournir les renseignements suivants : a. le type de réseau qui a été construit (p. ex., fixe, mobile) ainsi que la capacité offerte aux divers endroits (p. ex., les écoles, les points d’accès sans fil, chez les utilisateurs finals) et la technologie utilisée (p. ex., fibre, câble, ligne d’abonné numérique, mobile, satellite, Wi-Fi); - le réseau est sans-fil- les abonnés, résidentiels ou commerciaux, choisissent un forfait de 5 MB à 40 MB avec capacité de téléchargement de 20 Gig à Illimité.b. les vitesses du service à large bande offertes aux abonnés, et la méthode que vous utilisez pour établir que ces vitesses répondraient aux besoins des abonnés; - les vitesses sont de 5 MB à 40 MB et les abonnés désiraient avoir la même offre que dans les autres régionsc. le montant de l’investissement ainsi que le ou les modes de financement utilisés; - le coût a été de 3 M $, financé par le Programme communautés rurales branchées du Gouvernement du Québec, par les municipalités participantes et Digicom.d. les détails relatifs à tout partenariat établi avec d’autres organisations pour déployer le réseau; - sans objete. les raisons motivant votre décision de déployer un réseau à large bande; - la demande du millieuf. l’approche que vous préconisez quant à l’utilisation du réseau par les fournisseurs de services (le cas échéant), y compris : i. la ou les compagnies offrant le service de détail; - faire affaire avec des distributeurs locaux et régionauxii. une description de la méthode employée pour choisir le fournisseur de services de télécommunications (s’il y a un seul fournisseur de service). - inclut dans l’appel d’offres pour la construction du réseau2. Si des services de détail sont disponibles sur votre réseau, veuillez fournir les renseignements suivants : a. les types de services de télécommunication disponibles (p. ex., téléphonie filaire, téléphonie sans fil mobile, Internet filaire et Internet sans fil mobile) et le prix pour chaque offre de service, et fournissez une description des caractéristiques du service incluses dans chaque offre de service (p. ex., la vitesse, les limites d’utilisation de données, les minutes d’appel); - les abonnés, résidentiels ou commerciaux, choisissent un forfait de 5 MB à 40 MB avec capacité de téléchargement de 20 Gig à illimités- les forfaits varient de 50 $ à 100 $ par mois- la téléphonie IP est offerte pour 30 $ / mois avec messagerie et interurbain illimité au Canadab. les trois offres de détail les plus populaires pour chaque type de services indiqués en a) ci-dessus; - internet haute vitesse de base, vitesse accélérée et téléphoniec. dans le cas de chaque catégorie de services de télécommunication que vous fournissez (p. ex., téléphonie filaire, téléphonie sans fil mobile, Internet filaire et Internet sans fil mobile), une description des offres de service (p.ex., forfaits à prix réduit, prix spéciaux) ou des mesures (p. ex., outils de gestion de la facture, blocage de l’accès à l’interurbain) disponibles pour aider certains segments de la population pour qui l’accès ou le caractère abordable de cet accès peut constituer une source de préoccupation (p. ex., les personnes âgées, les Canadiens à faible revenu, les personnes handicapées, les étudiants). - Sans onbjet

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2390437 - 2015-134 - Réponses aux demandes de renseignements - Digicom Technologie Inc.html

Demande de renseignements : Information volontaire de la compagnie Digicom Technologies Inc.Demande de renseignements1. En ce qui concerne les réseaux ou les installations de télécommunication construits ou détenus par votre organisation, ou les services de télécommunication qu’elle offre, veuillez fournir les renseignements suivants : a. le type de réseau qui a été construit (p. ex., fixe, mobile) ainsi que la capacité offerte aux divers endroits (p. ex., les écoles, les points d’accès sans fil, chez les utilisateurs finals) et la technologie utilisée (p. ex., fibre, câble, ligne d’abonné numérique, mobile, satellite, Wi-Fi); - le réseau est sans-fil- les abonnés, résidentiels ou commerciaux, choisissent un forfait de 5 MB à 40 MB avec capacité de téléchargement de 20 Gig à Illimité.b. les vitesses du service à large bande offertes aux abonnés, et la méthode que vous utilisez pour établir que ces vitesses répondraient aux besoins des abonnés; - les vitesses sont de 5 MB à 40 MB et les abonnés désiraient avoir la même offre que dans les autres régionsc. le montant de l’investissement ainsi que le ou les modes de financement utilisés; - le coût a été de 3 M $, financé par le Programme communautés rurales branchées du Gouvernement du Québec, par les municipalités participantes et Digicom.d. les détails relatifs à tout partenariat établi avec d’autres organisations pour déployer le réseau; - sans objete. les raisons motivant votre décision de déployer un réseau à large bande; - la demande du millieuf. l’approche que vous préconisez quant à l’utilisation du réseau par les fournisseurs de services (le cas échéant), y compris : i. la ou les compagnies offrant le service de détail; - faire affaire avec des distributeurs locaux et régionauxii. une description de la méthode employée pour choisir le fournisseur de services de télécommunications (s’il y a un seul fournisseur de service). - inclut dans l’appel d’offres pour la construction du réseau2. Si des services de détail sont disponibles sur votre réseau, veuillez fournir les renseignements suivants : a. les types de services de télécommunication disponibles (p. ex., téléphonie filaire, téléphonie sans fil mobile, Internet filaire et Internet sans fil mobile) et le prix pour chaque offre de service, et fournissez une description des caractéristiques du service incluses dans chaque offre de service (p. ex., la vitesse, les limites d’utilisation de données, les minutes d’appel); - les abonnés, résidentiels ou commerciaux, choisissent un forfait de 5 MB à 40 MB avec capacité de téléchargement de 20 Gig à illimités- les forfaits varient de 50 $ à 100 $ par mois- la téléphonie IP est offerte pour 30 $ / mois avec messagerie et interurbain illimité au Canadab. les trois offres de détail les plus populaires pour chaque type de services indiqués en a) ci-dessus; - internet haute vitesse de base, vitesse accélérée et téléphoniec. dans le cas de chaque catégorie de services de télécommunication que vous fournissez (p. ex., téléphonie filaire, téléphonie sans fil mobile, Internet filaire et Internet sans fil mobile), une description des offres de service (p.ex., forfaits à prix réduit, prix spéciaux) ou des mesures (p. ex., outils de gestion de la facture, blocage de l’accès à l’interurbain) disponibles pour aider certains segments de la population pour qui l’accès ou le caractère abordable de cet accès peut constituer une source de préoccupation (p. ex., les personnes âgées, les Canadiens à faible revenu, les personnes handicapées, les étudiants). - Sans onbjet

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2394826 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - Iristel_CRTC_6_ABRIDGED.pdf

ABRIDGED IRISTEL RESPONSE TO INTERROGATORY 14 JULY 2015 IRISTEL (CRTC) 6 ABRIDGED PAGE 1 OF 1

INFORMATION REQUESTED BY
THE CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION

[Wireline, mobile wireless, fixed wireless and/or satellite direct to home Internet service providers] Q: 6. Provide the monthly average usage of data [in gigabytes (GB)] for residential customers for the year 2014 for i) wireline Internet service, and ii) mobile wireless Internet service.

A: i) Below you may find the monthly average usage of data [in gigabytes (GB)] for residential customers for the year 2014 for wireline Internet service:

#
ii) N/A

Certain information contained in the response to this request for information is filed in confidence with the Commission pursuant to section 39 of the Act. The information in question is: (1) commercial information pertaining to the service offerings of Iristel. Disclosure of this information could prejudice the competitive position of Iristel and result in material loss, thereby causing specific direct harm. There is no discernible public benefit to the disclosure of the information in question. Therefore, the public interest in disclosure does not outweigh the specific direct harm to Iristel resulting from such disclosure.

***END OF DOCUMENT*** # filed in Confidence

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2394826 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - Iristel_CRTC_6_ABRIDGED.pdf

ABRIDGED IRISTEL RESPONSE TO INTERROGATORY 14 JULY 2015 IRISTEL (CRTC) 6 ABRIDGED PAGE 1 OF 1

INFORMATION REQUESTED BY
THE CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION

[Wireline, mobile wireless, fixed wireless and/or satellite direct to home Internet service providers] Q: 6. Provide the monthly average usage of data [in gigabytes (GB)] for residential customers for the year 2014 for i) wireline Internet service, and ii) mobile wireless Internet service.

A: i) Below you may find the monthly average usage of data [in gigabytes (GB)] for residential customers for the year 2014 for wireline Internet service:

#
ii) N/A

Certain information contained in the response to this request for information is filed in confidence with the Commission pursuant to section 39 of the Act. The information in question is: (1) commercial information pertaining to the service offerings of Iristel. Disclosure of this information could prejudice the competitive position of Iristel and result in material loss, thereby causing specific direct harm. There is no discernible public benefit to the disclosure of the information in question. Therefore, the public interest in disclosure does not outweigh the specific direct harm to Iristel resulting from such disclosure.

***END OF DOCUMENT*** # filed in Confidence

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2394826 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - Iristel_CRTC_6_ABRIDGED.pdf

ABRIDGED IRISTEL RESPONSE TO INTERROGATORY 14 JULY 2015 IRISTEL (CRTC) 6 ABRIDGED PAGE 1 OF 1

INFORMATION REQUESTED BY
THE CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION

[Wireline, mobile wireless, fixed wireless and/or satellite direct to home Internet service providers] Q: 6. Provide the monthly average usage of data [in gigabytes (GB)] for residential customers for the year 2014 for i) wireline Internet service, and ii) mobile wireless Internet service.

A: i) Below you may find the monthly average usage of data [in gigabytes (GB)] for residential customers for the year 2014 for wireline Internet service:

#
ii) N/A

Certain information contained in the response to this request for information is filed in confidence with the Commission pursuant to section 39 of the Act. The information in question is: (1) commercial information pertaining to the service offerings of Iristel. Disclosure of this information could prejudice the competitive position of Iristel and result in material loss, thereby causing specific direct harm. There is no discernible public benefit to the disclosure of the information in question. Therefore, the public interest in disclosure does not outweigh the specific direct harm to Iristel resulting from such disclosure.

***END OF DOCUMENT*** # filed in Confidence

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2394826 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - Iristel_CRTC_6_ABRIDGED.pdf

ABRIDGED IRISTEL RESPONSE TO INTERROGATORY 14 JULY 2015 IRISTEL (CRTC) 6 ABRIDGED PAGE 1 OF 1

INFORMATION REQUESTED BY
THE CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION

[Wireline, mobile wireless, fixed wireless and/or satellite direct to home Internet service providers] Q: 6. Provide the monthly average usage of data [in gigabytes (GB)] for residential customers for the year 2014 for i) wireline Internet service, and ii) mobile wireless Internet service.

A: i) Below you may find the monthly average usage of data [in gigabytes (GB)] for residential customers for the year 2014 for wireline Internet service:

#
ii) N/A

Certain information contained in the response to this request for information is filed in confidence with the Commission pursuant to section 39 of the Act. The information in question is: (1) commercial information pertaining to the service offerings of Iristel. Disclosure of this information could prejudice the competitive position of Iristel and result in material loss, thereby causing specific direct harm. There is no discernible public benefit to the disclosure of the information in question. Therefore, the public interest in disclosure does not outweigh the specific direct harm to Iristel resulting from such disclosure.

***END OF DOCUMENT*** # filed in Confidence

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2395148 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - Telesat - CRTC TNOC 2015-134 Responses_4.pdf

TELESAT Response to Request for Information 14 July 2015 Telesat(CRTC)7May15 – 4

**** 1 of 1
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CRTC)

4. Identify the five most popular features (e.g. voicemail, call display, extra usage plan, email account) chosen by your residential customers for mobile wireless services.

Provide a description of those features (including the non-discounted price) and the corresponding number and percentage of customers subscribing to them. In addition, specify the number and percentage of these customers located in i) HCSAs and ii) non-HCSAs for each province/territory where the company provides mobile wireless service.

ANSWER:
Not applicable to Telesat.
*** End of Document ***

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2395148 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - Telesat - CRTC TNOC 2015-134 Responses_4.pdf

TELESAT Response to Request for Information 14 July 2015 Telesat(CRTC)7May15 – 4

**** 1 of 1
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CRTC)

4. Identify the five most popular features (e.g. voicemail, call display, extra usage plan, email account) chosen by your residential customers for mobile wireless services.

Provide a description of those features (including the non-discounted price) and the corresponding number and percentage of customers subscribing to them. In addition, specify the number and percentage of these customers located in i) HCSAs and ii) non-HCSAs for each province/territory where the company provides mobile wireless service.

ANSWER:
Not applicable to Telesat.
*** End of Document ***

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2395148 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - Telesat - CRTC TNOC 2015-134 Responses_4.pdf

TELESAT Response to Request for Information 14 July 2015 Telesat(CRTC)7May15 – 4

**** 1 of 1
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CRTC)

4. Identify the five most popular features (e.g. voicemail, call display, extra usage plan, email account) chosen by your residential customers for mobile wireless services.

Provide a description of those features (including the non-discounted price) and the corresponding number and percentage of customers subscribing to them. In addition, specify the number and percentage of these customers located in i) HCSAs and ii) non-HCSAs for each province/territory where the company provides mobile wireless service.

ANSWER:
Not applicable to Telesat.
*** End of Document ***

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2395148 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - Telesat - CRTC TNOC 2015-134 Responses_4.pdf

TELESAT Response to Request for Information 14 July 2015 Telesat(CRTC)7May15 – 4

**** 1 of 1
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CRTC)

4. Identify the five most popular features (e.g. voicemail, call display, extra usage plan, email account) chosen by your residential customers for mobile wireless services.

Provide a description of those features (including the non-discounted price) and the corresponding number and percentage of customers subscribing to them. In addition, specify the number and percentage of these customers located in i) HCSAs and ii) non-HCSAs for each province/territory where the company provides mobile wireless service.

ANSWER:
Not applicable to Telesat.
*** End of Document ***

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2396357 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - Execulink_RFI_Responses_14Jul2015_ABRIDGED.xls
CRTC-1
Execulink Telecom Inc. Abridged
Wireline & Mobile Wireless Service Providers

SILEC Territory as of December 2014 Non-SILEC Operations as of December 2014 Subscribers to lowest Priced Wireline Voice Service Subscribers to lowest Priced Postpaid Mobile Wireless Voice Plan Subscribers to lowest Priced Wireline Voice Service Subscribers to lowest Priced Postpaid Mobile Wireless Voice Plan # of customers located in HCSA # # # #

% of customers located in HCSA # # # #
# of customers located in non-HCSA # # # #
% of customers located in non-HCSA # # # #
Non Discounted **** $29.95 n/a # #

Additional Monthly Charges Relay ($0.13), 911($0.24) n/a $0 # Description of each service offering (ex: optional services or enhanced features; number of local minutes, long distance minutes, text messages, etc) Valupac Basic - Call display, Voicemail ($9.95), Valuepac - Call display, Call waiting, 3-Way calling, speed calling, Call forwarding, Automatic Recall, selective call rejection ($13.95), Valupac Plus - all of Valupac with the addition of Visual Call Waiting ($14.95) n/a # # **** available throughout Province? Y or N (if N, provide reason) Where Execulink Facilities exist n/a Where Execulink Facilities exist Where Execulink Facilities existCRTC-2

Execulink Telecom Inc.
Mobile Wireless Services Providers
Prepaid Wireless Voice Plan
Lowest priced plan as of Dec 2014 n/a

Description of each service offering (ex: per call connection, roll over minutes, other associated charges) n/a **** per minute - local call n/a

Description of each service offering (ex: optional services or enhanced features; number of local minutes, long distance minutes, text messages, etc) n/a Plan offered throughout Province? Y or N (if N, provide reason) n/aCRTC-3

Execulink Telecom Inc. Abridged
Internet Service Providers

SILEC Territory - Subscribed to plan closest to the Commissions target speed of 5 Mbps download & 1 Mbps upload Non-SILEC Operations - Subscribed to plan closest to the Commissions target speed of 5 Mbps download & 1 Mbps upload Number of residential customers (as of Dec 2014) # # % of residential customers (as of Dec 2014) # #

% of customers in HCSA # #
% of customers in non-HCSA # #
Non Discounted **** # #

Description of plan (speed, data cap, overage charge) # # **** available throughout Province? Y or N (if N, provide reason) Where Execulink Facilities exist Where Execulink Facilities existCRTC-4

Execulink Telecom Inc. Abridged
Mobile Wireless Service Providers HCSA non-HCSA

Residential Customers - Mobile Wireless Service 5 most popular features Description **** Additional Costs % # % # 1 # # # # # # # #

2 # # # # # # # #
3 # # # # # # # #
4
5
CRTC-5
Execulink Telecom Inc. Abridged
TSPs HCSA non-HCSA

Residential Customers 3 most popular wireline voice plans Description **** - Non-discounted Additional Costs % # % # 1 SILEC Plan Basic with tone - no features 29.95 911, relay # # # # 2 Non-Silec Plan Phone with 7 Calling features # # # # # 3 no other plans available

HCSA non-HCSA

Residential Customers 3 most popular wireline Internet Plans Description **** - Non-discounted Additional Costs % # % # 1 # # # # # # #

2 # # # # # # #
3 # # # # # # # #
CRTC-6
Execulink Telecom Inc. Abridged

Wireline, mobile wireless, fixed wireless and/or satellite direct to home Internet service providers Residential Customers for 2014 Monthly Average Usage (GB) Wireline Internet Service #

Mobile Wireless Internet Service #
CRTC-7
Execulink Telecom Inc.
TSPs
For the Year 2014

Service Service Offering/Initiatives - discounted for affordability (seniors, students..) % Customers using offers and initaitives # of Customers using offers and initiatives Wireline Voice - offer toll denial, payment plans, affordable speed offerings, special bill formats for those with disabilities if requested, casual call blocking, highly readable PDF invoicing Data not avialable Data not avialable Mobile Wireless voice - offer data/call blocking, payment plans, multi-tiered plans avaialable, special bill formats for those with disabilities if requested, casual call blocking, highly readable PDF invoicing Data not avialable Data not avialable Wireline Internet - payment plans, affordable speed offerings, special bill formats for those with disabilities if requested, highly readable PDF invoicing Data not avialable Data not avialable Mobile Wireless Internet - payment plans, affordable speed offerings, special bill formats for those with disabilities if requested, highly readable PDF invoicing Data not avialable Data not avialable Fixed Wireless Internet - payment plans, affordable speed offerings, special bill formats for those with disabilities if requested, highly readable PDF invoicing Data not avialable Data not avialable Satellite Internet n/a n/a n/a

CRTC-8
Execulink Telecom Inc. Abridged
TSPs

SILEC Territory - Capable of Serving SILEC -Territory Being Served SILEC Territory - Hitting Target 5Mbps/1Mbps Non-SILEC Operations - Capable of Serving Non-SILEC Operations - Being Served Non-SILEC Operations - Hitting Target 5Mbps/1Mbps (Speed actually being delivered) # of Households Unknown - never counted # # # # #

CRTC-9
Execulink Telecom Inc. Abridged
TSPs

With respect to your company's operating territory, provide the following information for areas that are currently unserved or underserved as of Dec 2014.

SILEC Operating Territory

Technologies used in the access facilities for serving subscribers: Unserved - Average Upstream Speeds Offered Unserved - Average Downstream Speeds Offered Underserved - Average Upstream Speeds Offered Underserved - Average Downstream Speeds Offered xDSL no unserved customers no unserved customers # # Coax no unserved customers no unserved customers no underserved customers no underserved customers Technologies used for connecting to the PoP: Capacity to/from the POP - Mb Fibre 1000/1000

Non-SILEC Operations

Technologies used in the access facilities for serving subscribers: Unserved - Average Upstream Speeds Offered Unserved - Average Downstream Speeds Offered Underserved - Average Upstream Speeds Offered Underserved - Average Downstream Speeds Offered FTTH no unserved customers no unserved customers no underserved customers no underserved customers Coax no unserved customers no unserved customers no underserved customers no underserved customers Fixed Wireless no unserved customers no unserved customers # # Technologies used for connecting to the PoP: Capacity to/from the POP - Mb Fibre #

FTTH-Wireline territory
Wireless coverage
Legend
CRTC-10
Execulink Telecom Inc. Abridged
TSPs

With respect to your company's operating territory, provide the following information in areas that are currently unserved or underserved as of Dec 2014 SILEC Operating Territory

Total number of Pops: #

Served and Unserved - Average Capacities (Mpbs) Served and Unserved - Total Capacity Used (Mpbs) Technologies used for backhaul for each POP To PoP From PoP Peak Non Peak **** Franks # # # #

Burgessville # # # #
Non-SILEC Operations
Total number of Pops:

Served and Unserved - Average Capacities (Mpbs) Served and Unserved - Total Capacity Used (Mpbs) Technologies used for backhaul for each POP To PoP From PoP Peak Non Peak **** # # # #

Burgessville # # # #

Note: Information on the POPs is based on the total peak of each POP of both served and underserved customers. We are unable to provide usage details for just underserved customers regarding peak usage.

The technology used for backhaul to/from each POP in our SILEC area and our Non-SILEC area is fibre based.

CRTC-11
Execulink Telecom Inc. Abridged
TSPs

To better understand historical and projected network utilization and demand for broadband Internet access services, provide responses to the following:

Question Answer

1 Describe the various engineering assumptions associated with network deployments/upgrades, such as percentage of active users at peak periods & at other times of the day, as well as their peak usage demands. Provide the oversubscription ratios used. # 2 Are different engineering assumptions utilized when planning network deployments/upgrades in different geographic areas, when different technologies are used, or where different speed tiers are offered to end users? If yes, please explain these differences # 3 For each of the years 2010-2014, provide 1) the network engineering assumption for throughput bandwidth allocated to each end user expressed in kbps & 2) the average volume of data used per end user expressed in gigabytes (GB) per month. see Q4 4 The network engineering assumption for throughput bandwidth allocated to each end user expressed in kbps for the following years The average volume of data used per end user for each of these years 2010 # #

2011 # #
2012 # #
2013 # #
2014 # #

5 For each of the years 2015 to 2019, provide forecasts for the information requested in above The average volume of data used per end user for each of these years 2015 # #

2016 # #
2017 # #
2018 # #
2019 # #
10 Minus Towels
5 Mbps Twers
3 Mbps Twers
15 Mbps Twers
— VDSLNeas
— FI'I'HNeas
— Cable Areas

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2396357 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - Execulink_RFI_Responses_14Jul2015_ABRIDGED.xls
CRTC-1
Execulink Telecom Inc. Abridged
Wireline & Mobile Wireless Service Providers

SILEC Territory as of December 2014 Non-SILEC Operations as of December 2014 Subscribers to lowest Priced Wireline Voice Service Subscribers to lowest Priced Postpaid Mobile Wireless Voice Plan Subscribers to lowest Priced Wireline Voice Service Subscribers to lowest Priced Postpaid Mobile Wireless Voice Plan # of customers located in HCSA # # # #

% of customers located in HCSA # # # #
# of customers located in non-HCSA # # # #
% of customers located in non-HCSA # # # #
Non Discounted **** $29.95 n/a # #

Additional Monthly Charges Relay ($0.13), 911($0.24) n/a $0 # Description of each service offering (ex: optional services or enhanced features; number of local minutes, long distance minutes, text messages, etc) Valupac Basic - Call display, Voicemail ($9.95), Valuepac - Call display, Call waiting, 3-Way calling, speed calling, Call forwarding, Automatic Recall, selective call rejection ($13.95), Valupac Plus - all of Valupac with the addition of Visual Call Waiting ($14.95) n/a # # **** available throughout Province? Y or N (if N, provide reason) Where Execulink Facilities exist n/a Where Execulink Facilities exist Where Execulink Facilities existCRTC-2

Execulink Telecom Inc.
Mobile Wireless Services Providers
Prepaid Wireless Voice Plan
Lowest priced plan as of Dec 2014 n/a

Description of each service offering (ex: per call connection, roll over minutes, other associated charges) n/a **** per minute - local call n/a

Description of each service offering (ex: optional services or enhanced features; number of local minutes, long distance minutes, text messages, etc) n/a Plan offered throughout Province? Y or N (if N, provide reason) n/aCRTC-3

Execulink Telecom Inc. Abridged
Internet Service Providers

SILEC Territory - Subscribed to plan closest to the Commissions target speed of 5 Mbps download & 1 Mbps upload Non-SILEC Operations - Subscribed to plan closest to the Commissions target speed of 5 Mbps download & 1 Mbps upload Number of residential customers (as of Dec 2014) # # % of residential customers (as of Dec 2014) # #

% of customers in HCSA # #
% of customers in non-HCSA # #
Non Discounted **** # #

Description of plan (speed, data cap, overage charge) # # **** available throughout Province? Y or N (if N, provide reason) Where Execulink Facilities exist Where Execulink Facilities existCRTC-4

Execulink Telecom Inc. Abridged
Mobile Wireless Service Providers HCSA non-HCSA

Residential Customers - Mobile Wireless Service 5 most popular features Description **** Additional Costs % # % # 1 # # # # # # # #

2 # # # # # # # #
3 # # # # # # # #
4
5
CRTC-5
Execulink Telecom Inc. Abridged
TSPs HCSA non-HCSA

Residential Customers 3 most popular wireline voice plans Description **** - Non-discounted Additional Costs % # % # 1 SILEC Plan Basic with tone - no features 29.95 911, relay # # # # 2 Non-Silec Plan Phone with 7 Calling features # # # # # 3 no other plans available

HCSA non-HCSA

Residential Customers 3 most popular wireline Internet Plans Description **** - Non-discounted Additional Costs % # % # 1 # # # # # # #

2 # # # # # # #
3 # # # # # # # #
CRTC-6
Execulink Telecom Inc. Abridged

Wireline, mobile wireless, fixed wireless and/or satellite direct to home Internet service providers Residential Customers for 2014 Monthly Average Usage (GB) Wireline Internet Service #

Mobile Wireless Internet Service #
CRTC-7
Execulink Telecom Inc.
TSPs
For the Year 2014

Service Service Offering/Initiatives - discounted for affordability (seniors, students..) % Customers using offers and initaitives # of Customers using offers and initiatives Wireline Voice - offer toll denial, payment plans, affordable speed offerings, special bill formats for those with disabilities if requested, casual call blocking, highly readable PDF invoicing Data not avialable Data not avialable Mobile Wireless voice - offer data/call blocking, payment plans, multi-tiered plans avaialable, special bill formats for those with disabilities if requested, casual call blocking, highly readable PDF invoicing Data not avialable Data not avialable Wireline Internet - payment plans, affordable speed offerings, special bill formats for those with disabilities if requested, highly readable PDF invoicing Data not avialable Data not avialable Mobile Wireless Internet - payment plans, affordable speed offerings, special bill formats for those with disabilities if requested, highly readable PDF invoicing Data not avialable Data not avialable Fixed Wireless Internet - payment plans, affordable speed offerings, special bill formats for those with disabilities if requested, highly readable PDF invoicing Data not avialable Data not avialable Satellite Internet n/a n/a n/a

CRTC-8
Execulink Telecom Inc. Abridged
TSPs

SILEC Territory - Capable of Serving SILEC -Territory Being Served SILEC Territory - Hitting Target 5Mbps/1Mbps Non-SILEC Operations - Capable of Serving Non-SILEC Operations - Being Served Non-SILEC Operations - Hitting Target 5Mbps/1Mbps (Speed actually being delivered) # of Households Unknown - never counted # # # # #

CRTC-9
Execulink Telecom Inc. Abridged
TSPs

With respect to your company's operating territory, provide the following information for areas that are currently unserved or underserved as of Dec 2014.

SILEC Operating Territory

Technologies used in the access facilities for serving subscribers: Unserved - Average Upstream Speeds Offered Unserved - Average Downstream Speeds Offered Underserved - Average Upstream Speeds Offered Underserved - Average Downstream Speeds Offered xDSL no unserved customers no unserved customers # # Coax no unserved customers no unserved customers no underserved customers no underserved customers Technologies used for connecting to the PoP: Capacity to/from the POP - Mb Fibre 1000/1000

Non-SILEC Operations

Technologies used in the access facilities for serving subscribers: Unserved - Average Upstream Speeds Offered Unserved - Average Downstream Speeds Offered Underserved - Average Upstream Speeds Offered Underserved - Average Downstream Speeds Offered FTTH no unserved customers no unserved customers no underserved customers no underserved customers Coax no unserved customers no unserved customers no underserved customers no underserved customers Fixed Wireless no unserved customers no unserved customers # # Technologies used for connecting to the PoP: Capacity to/from the POP - Mb Fibre #

FTTH-Wireline territory
Wireless coverage
Legend
CRTC-10
Execulink Telecom Inc. Abridged
TSPs

With respect to your company's operating territory, provide the following information in areas that are currently unserved or underserved as of Dec 2014 SILEC Operating Territory

Total number of Pops: #

Served and Unserved - Average Capacities (Mpbs) Served and Unserved - Total Capacity Used (Mpbs) Technologies used for backhaul for each POP To PoP From PoP Peak Non Peak **** Franks # # # #

Burgessville # # # #
Non-SILEC Operations
Total number of Pops:

Served and Unserved - Average Capacities (Mpbs) Served and Unserved - Total Capacity Used (Mpbs) Technologies used for backhaul for each POP To PoP From PoP Peak Non Peak **** # # # #

Burgessville # # # #

Note: Information on the POPs is based on the total peak of each POP of both served and underserved customers. We are unable to provide usage details for just underserved customers regarding peak usage.

The technology used for backhaul to/from each POP in our SILEC area and our Non-SILEC area is fibre based.

CRTC-11
Execulink Telecom Inc. Abridged
TSPs

To better understand historical and projected network utilization and demand for broadband Internet access services, provide responses to the following:

Question Answer

1 Describe the various engineering assumptions associated with network deployments/upgrades, such as percentage of active users at peak periods & at other times of the day, as well as their peak usage demands. Provide the oversubscription ratios used. # 2 Are different engineering assumptions utilized when planning network deployments/upgrades in different geographic areas, when different technologies are used, or where different speed tiers are offered to end users? If yes, please explain these differences # 3 For each of the years 2010-2014, provide 1) the network engineering assumption for throughput bandwidth allocated to each end user expressed in kbps & 2) the average volume of data used per end user expressed in gigabytes (GB) per month. see Q4 4 The network engineering assumption for throughput bandwidth allocated to each end user expressed in kbps for the following years The average volume of data used per end user for each of these years 2010 # #

2011 # #
2012 # #
2013 # #
2014 # #

5 For each of the years 2015 to 2019, provide forecasts for the information requested in above The average volume of data used per end user for each of these years 2015 # #

2016 # #
2017 # #
2018 # #
2019 # #
10 Minus Towels
5 Mbps Twers
3 Mbps Twers
15 Mbps Twers
— VDSLNeas
— FI'I'HNeas
— Cable Areas

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2396357 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - Execulink_RFI_Responses_14Jul2015_ABRIDGED.xls
CRTC-1
Execulink Telecom Inc. Abridged
Wireline & Mobile Wireless Service Providers

SILEC Territory as of December 2014 Non-SILEC Operations as of December 2014 Subscribers to lowest Priced Wireline Voice Service Subscribers to lowest Priced Postpaid Mobile Wireless Voice Plan Subscribers to lowest Priced Wireline Voice Service Subscribers to lowest Priced Postpaid Mobile Wireless Voice Plan # of customers located in HCSA # # # #

% of customers located in HCSA # # # #
# of customers located in non-HCSA # # # #
% of customers located in non-HCSA # # # #
Non Discounted **** $29.95 n/a # #

Additional Monthly Charges Relay ($0.13), 911($0.24) n/a $0 # Description of each service offering (ex: optional services or enhanced features; number of local minutes, long distance minutes, text messages, etc) Valupac Basic - Call display, Voicemail ($9.95), Valuepac - Call display, Call waiting, 3-Way calling, speed calling, Call forwarding, Automatic Recall, selective call rejection ($13.95), Valupac Plus - all of Valupac with the addition of Visual Call Waiting ($14.95) n/a # # **** available throughout Province? Y or N (if N, provide reason) Where Execulink Facilities exist n/a Where Execulink Facilities exist Where Execulink Facilities existCRTC-2

Execulink Telecom Inc.
Mobile Wireless Services Providers
Prepaid Wireless Voice Plan
Lowest priced plan as of Dec 2014 n/a

Description of each service offering (ex: per call connection, roll over minutes, other associated charges) n/a **** per minute - local call n/a

Description of each service offering (ex: optional services or enhanced features; number of local minutes, long distance minutes, text messages, etc) n/a Plan offered throughout Province? Y or N (if N, provide reason) n/aCRTC-3

Execulink Telecom Inc. Abridged
Internet Service Providers

SILEC Territory - Subscribed to plan closest to the Commissions target speed of 5 Mbps download & 1 Mbps upload Non-SILEC Operations - Subscribed to plan closest to the Commissions target speed of 5 Mbps download & 1 Mbps upload Number of residential customers (as of Dec 2014) # # % of residential customers (as of Dec 2014) # #

% of customers in HCSA # #
% of customers in non-HCSA # #
Non Discounted **** # #

Description of plan (speed, data cap, overage charge) # # **** available throughout Province? Y or N (if N, provide reason) Where Execulink Facilities exist Where Execulink Facilities existCRTC-4

Execulink Telecom Inc. Abridged
Mobile Wireless Service Providers HCSA non-HCSA

Residential Customers - Mobile Wireless Service 5 most popular features Description **** Additional Costs % # % # 1 # # # # # # # #

2 # # # # # # # #
3 # # # # # # # #
4
5
CRTC-5
Execulink Telecom Inc. Abridged
TSPs HCSA non-HCSA

Residential Customers 3 most popular wireline voice plans Description **** - Non-discounted Additional Costs % # % # 1 SILEC Plan Basic with tone - no features 29.95 911, relay # # # # 2 Non-Silec Plan Phone with 7 Calling features # # # # # 3 no other plans available

HCSA non-HCSA

Residential Customers 3 most popular wireline Internet Plans Description **** - Non-discounted Additional Costs % # % # 1 # # # # # # #

2 # # # # # # #
3 # # # # # # # #
CRTC-6
Execulink Telecom Inc. Abridged

Wireline, mobile wireless, fixed wireless and/or satellite direct to home Internet service providers Residential Customers for 2014 Monthly Average Usage (GB) Wireline Internet Service #

Mobile Wireless Internet Service #
CRTC-7
Execulink Telecom Inc.
TSPs
For the Year 2014

Service Service Offering/Initiatives - discounted for affordability (seniors, students..) % Customers using offers and initaitives # of Customers using offers and initiatives Wireline Voice - offer toll denial, payment plans, affordable speed offerings, special bill formats for those with disabilities if requested, casual call blocking, highly readable PDF invoicing Data not avialable Data not avialable Mobile Wireless voice - offer data/call blocking, payment plans, multi-tiered plans avaialable, special bill formats for those with disabilities if requested, casual call blocking, highly readable PDF invoicing Data not avialable Data not avialable Wireline Internet - payment plans, affordable speed offerings, special bill formats for those with disabilities if requested, highly readable PDF invoicing Data not avialable Data not avialable Mobile Wireless Internet - payment plans, affordable speed offerings, special bill formats for those with disabilities if requested, highly readable PDF invoicing Data not avialable Data not avialable Fixed Wireless Internet - payment plans, affordable speed offerings, special bill formats for those with disabilities if requested, highly readable PDF invoicing Data not avialable Data not avialable Satellite Internet n/a n/a n/a

CRTC-8
Execulink Telecom Inc. Abridged
TSPs

SILEC Territory - Capable of Serving SILEC -Territory Being Served SILEC Territory - Hitting Target 5Mbps/1Mbps Non-SILEC Operations - Capable of Serving Non-SILEC Operations - Being Served Non-SILEC Operations - Hitting Target 5Mbps/1Mbps (Speed actually being delivered) # of Households Unknown - never counted # # # # #

CRTC-9
Execulink Telecom Inc. Abridged
TSPs

With respect to your company's operating territory, provide the following information for areas that are currently unserved or underserved as of Dec 2014.

SILEC Operating Territory

Technologies used in the access facilities for serving subscribers: Unserved - Average Upstream Speeds Offered Unserved - Average Downstream Speeds Offered Underserved - Average Upstream Speeds Offered Underserved - Average Downstream Speeds Offered xDSL no unserved customers no unserved customers # # Coax no unserved customers no unserved customers no underserved customers no underserved customers Technologies used for connecting to the PoP: Capacity to/from the POP - Mb Fibre 1000/1000

Non-SILEC Operations

Technologies used in the access facilities for serving subscribers: Unserved - Average Upstream Speeds Offered Unserved - Average Downstream Speeds Offered Underserved - Average Upstream Speeds Offered Underserved - Average Downstream Speeds Offered FTTH no unserved customers no unserved customers no underserved customers no underserved customers Coax no unserved customers no unserved customers no underserved customers no underserved customers Fixed Wireless no unserved customers no unserved customers # # Technologies used for connecting to the PoP: Capacity to/from the POP - Mb Fibre #

FTTH-Wireline territory
Wireless coverage
Legend
CRTC-10
Execulink Telecom Inc. Abridged
TSPs

With respect to your company's operating territory, provide the following information in areas that are currently unserved or underserved as of Dec 2014 SILEC Operating Territory

Total number of Pops: #

Served and Unserved - Average Capacities (Mpbs) Served and Unserved - Total Capacity Used (Mpbs) Technologies used for backhaul for each POP To PoP From PoP Peak Non Peak **** Franks # # # #

Burgessville # # # #
Non-SILEC Operations
Total number of Pops:

Served and Unserved - Average Capacities (Mpbs) Served and Unserved - Total Capacity Used (Mpbs) Technologies used for backhaul for each POP To PoP From PoP Peak Non Peak **** # # # #

Burgessville # # # #

Note: Information on the POPs is based on the total peak of each POP of both served and underserved customers. We are unable to provide usage details for just underserved customers regarding peak usage.

The technology used for backhaul to/from each POP in our SILEC area and our Non-SILEC area is fibre based.

CRTC-11
Execulink Telecom Inc. Abridged
TSPs

To better understand historical and projected network utilization and demand for broadband Internet access services, provide responses to the following:

Question Answer

1 Describe the various engineering assumptions associated with network deployments/upgrades, such as percentage of active users at peak periods & at other times of the day, as well as their peak usage demands. Provide the oversubscription ratios used. # 2 Are different engineering assumptions utilized when planning network deployments/upgrades in different geographic areas, when different technologies are used, or where different speed tiers are offered to end users? If yes, please explain these differences # 3 For each of the years 2010-2014, provide 1) the network engineering assumption for throughput bandwidth allocated to each end user expressed in kbps & 2) the average volume of data used per end user expressed in gigabytes (GB) per month. see Q4 4 The network engineering assumption for throughput bandwidth allocated to each end user expressed in kbps for the following years The average volume of data used per end user for each of these years 2010 # #

2011 # #
2012 # #
2013 # #
2014 # #

5 For each of the years 2015 to 2019, provide forecasts for the information requested in above The average volume of data used per end user for each of these years 2015 # #

2016 # #
2017 # #
2018 # #
2019 # #
10 Minus Towels
5 Mbps Twers
3 Mbps Twers
15 Mbps Twers
— VDSLNeas
— FI'I'HNeas
— Cable Areas

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2396357 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - Execulink_RFI_Responses_14Jul2015_ABRIDGED.xls
CRTC-1
Execulink Telecom Inc. Abridged
Wireline & Mobile Wireless Service Providers

SILEC Territory as of December 2014 Non-SILEC Operations as of December 2014 Subscribers to lowest Priced Wireline Voice Service Subscribers to lowest Priced Postpaid Mobile Wireless Voice Plan Subscribers to lowest Priced Wireline Voice Service Subscribers to lowest Priced Postpaid Mobile Wireless Voice Plan # of customers located in HCSA # # # #

% of customers located in HCSA # # # #
# of customers located in non-HCSA # # # #
% of customers located in non-HCSA # # # #
Non Discounted **** $29.95 n/a # #

Additional Monthly Charges Relay ($0.13), 911($0.24) n/a $0 # Description of each service offering (ex: optional services or enhanced features; number of local minutes, long distance minutes, text messages, etc) Valupac Basic - Call display, Voicemail ($9.95), Valuepac - Call display, Call waiting, 3-Way calling, speed calling, Call forwarding, Automatic Recall, selective call rejection ($13.95), Valupac Plus - all of Valupac with the addition of Visual Call Waiting ($14.95) n/a # # **** available throughout Province? Y or N (if N, provide reason) Where Execulink Facilities exist n/a Where Execulink Facilities exist Where Execulink Facilities existCRTC-2

Execulink Telecom Inc.
Mobile Wireless Services Providers
Prepaid Wireless Voice Plan
Lowest priced plan as of Dec 2014 n/a

Description of each service offering (ex: per call connection, roll over minutes, other associated charges) n/a **** per minute - local call n/a

Description of each service offering (ex: optional services or enhanced features; number of local minutes, long distance minutes, text messages, etc) n/a Plan offered throughout Province? Y or N (if N, provide reason) n/aCRTC-3

Execulink Telecom Inc. Abridged
Internet Service Providers

SILEC Territory - Subscribed to plan closest to the Commissions target speed of 5 Mbps download & 1 Mbps upload Non-SILEC Operations - Subscribed to plan closest to the Commissions target speed of 5 Mbps download & 1 Mbps upload Number of residential customers (as of Dec 2014) # # % of residential customers (as of Dec 2014) # #

% of customers in HCSA # #
% of customers in non-HCSA # #
Non Discounted **** # #

Description of plan (speed, data cap, overage charge) # # **** available throughout Province? Y or N (if N, provide reason) Where Execulink Facilities exist Where Execulink Facilities existCRTC-4

Execulink Telecom Inc. Abridged
Mobile Wireless Service Providers HCSA non-HCSA

Residential Customers - Mobile Wireless Service 5 most popular features Description **** Additional Costs % # % # 1 # # # # # # # #

2 # # # # # # # #
3 # # # # # # # #
4
5
CRTC-5
Execulink Telecom Inc. Abridged
TSPs HCSA non-HCSA

Residential Customers 3 most popular wireline voice plans Description **** - Non-discounted Additional Costs % # % # 1 SILEC Plan Basic with tone - no features 29.95 911, relay # # # # 2 Non-Silec Plan Phone with 7 Calling features # # # # # 3 no other plans available

HCSA non-HCSA

Residential Customers 3 most popular wireline Internet Plans Description **** - Non-discounted Additional Costs % # % # 1 # # # # # # #

2 # # # # # # #
3 # # # # # # # #
CRTC-6
Execulink Telecom Inc. Abridged

Wireline, mobile wireless, fixed wireless and/or satellite direct to home Internet service providers Residential Customers for 2014 Monthly Average Usage (GB) Wireline Internet Service #

Mobile Wireless Internet Service #
CRTC-7
Execulink Telecom Inc.
TSPs
For the Year 2014

Service Service Offering/Initiatives - discounted for affordability (seniors, students..) % Customers using offers and initaitives # of Customers using offers and initiatives Wireline Voice - offer toll denial, payment plans, affordable speed offerings, special bill formats for those with disabilities if requested, casual call blocking, highly readable PDF invoicing Data not avialable Data not avialable Mobile Wireless voice - offer data/call blocking, payment plans, multi-tiered plans avaialable, special bill formats for those with disabilities if requested, casual call blocking, highly readable PDF invoicing Data not avialable Data not avialable Wireline Internet - payment plans, affordable speed offerings, special bill formats for those with disabilities if requested, highly readable PDF invoicing Data not avialable Data not avialable Mobile Wireless Internet - payment plans, affordable speed offerings, special bill formats for those with disabilities if requested, highly readable PDF invoicing Data not avialable Data not avialable Fixed Wireless Internet - payment plans, affordable speed offerings, special bill formats for those with disabilities if requested, highly readable PDF invoicing Data not avialable Data not avialable Satellite Internet n/a n/a n/a

CRTC-8
Execulink Telecom Inc. Abridged
TSPs

SILEC Territory - Capable of Serving SILEC -Territory Being Served SILEC Territory - Hitting Target 5Mbps/1Mbps Non-SILEC Operations - Capable of Serving Non-SILEC Operations - Being Served Non-SILEC Operations - Hitting Target 5Mbps/1Mbps (Speed actually being delivered) # of Households Unknown - never counted # # # # #

CRTC-9
Execulink Telecom Inc. Abridged
TSPs

With respect to your company's operating territory, provide the following information for areas that are currently unserved or underserved as of Dec 2014.

SILEC Operating Territory

Technologies used in the access facilities for serving subscribers: Unserved - Average Upstream Speeds Offered Unserved - Average Downstream Speeds Offered Underserved - Average Upstream Speeds Offered Underserved - Average Downstream Speeds Offered xDSL no unserved customers no unserved customers # # Coax no unserved customers no unserved customers no underserved customers no underserved customers Technologies used for connecting to the PoP: Capacity to/from the POP - Mb Fibre 1000/1000

Non-SILEC Operations

Technologies used in the access facilities for serving subscribers: Unserved - Average Upstream Speeds Offered Unserved - Average Downstream Speeds Offered Underserved - Average Upstream Speeds Offered Underserved - Average Downstream Speeds Offered FTTH no unserved customers no unserved customers no underserved customers no underserved customers Coax no unserved customers no unserved customers no underserved customers no underserved customers Fixed Wireless no unserved customers no unserved customers # # Technologies used for connecting to the PoP: Capacity to/from the POP - Mb Fibre #

FTTH-Wireline territory
Wireless coverage
Legend
CRTC-10
Execulink Telecom Inc. Abridged
TSPs

With respect to your company's operating territory, provide the following information in areas that are currently unserved or underserved as of Dec 2014 SILEC Operating Territory

Total number of Pops: #

Served and Unserved - Average Capacities (Mpbs) Served and Unserved - Total Capacity Used (Mpbs) Technologies used for backhaul for each POP To PoP From PoP Peak Non Peak **** Franks # # # #

Burgessville # # # #
Non-SILEC Operations
Total number of Pops:

Served and Unserved - Average Capacities (Mpbs) Served and Unserved - Total Capacity Used (Mpbs) Technologies used for backhaul for each POP To PoP From PoP Peak Non Peak **** # # # #

Burgessville # # # #

Note: Information on the POPs is based on the total peak of each POP of both served and underserved customers. We are unable to provide usage details for just underserved customers regarding peak usage.

The technology used for backhaul to/from each POP in our SILEC area and our Non-SILEC area is fibre based.

CRTC-11
Execulink Telecom Inc. Abridged
TSPs

To better understand historical and projected network utilization and demand for broadband Internet access services, provide responses to the following:

Question Answer

1 Describe the various engineering assumptions associated with network deployments/upgrades, such as percentage of active users at peak periods & at other times of the day, as well as their peak usage demands. Provide the oversubscription ratios used. # 2 Are different engineering assumptions utilized when planning network deployments/upgrades in different geographic areas, when different technologies are used, or where different speed tiers are offered to end users? If yes, please explain these differences # 3 For each of the years 2010-2014, provide 1) the network engineering assumption for throughput bandwidth allocated to each end user expressed in kbps & 2) the average volume of data used per end user expressed in gigabytes (GB) per month. see Q4 4 The network engineering assumption for throughput bandwidth allocated to each end user expressed in kbps for the following years The average volume of data used per end user for each of these years 2010 # #

2011 # #
2012 # #
2013 # #
2014 # #

5 For each of the years 2015 to 2019, provide forecasts for the information requested in above The average volume of data used per end user for each of these years 2015 # #

2016 # #
2017 # #
2018 # #
2019 # #
10 Minus Towels
5 Mbps Twers
3 Mbps Twers
15 Mbps Twers
— VDSLNeas
— FI'I'HNeas
— Cable Areas

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2432360 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - Québecor - REVISÉE - Réponse corrigée à une demande ABRÉGÉE.doc
[image: image1.jpg]QUEBEC ,
Média

612, rue St-Jacques, 15e étage, **** SudMontréal (Québec) *** ***

1
Ligne directe : *-***-***-****
Télécopieur : *-***-***-****
Courriel : ******@***.com
Internet : www.quebecor.com
PIÈCE JOINTE ABRÉGÉE
Le 21 septembre 2015
Monsieur John Traversy
Secrétaire général
Conseil de la radiodiffusion et

des télécommunications canadiennesOttawa (Ontario) *** ***

Objet :

Dossier CRTC #8663-C12-201503186 – Avis de consultation de télécom CRTC 2015-134, Examen des services de télécommunication de base (ACT 2014-76) – Première ronde de demandes de renseignements – Réponse corrigée de Québecor Média inc. (Québecor Média) au nom de sa filiale Vidéotron s.e.n.c. (Vidéotron)[image: image1.jpg]

Monsieur Traversy,

1. Lors de la préparation de nos réponses à la deuxième ronde de demandes de renseignements dans le cadre de l’instance mentionnée en rubrique, nous avons découvert que des informations fournies dans les tableaux faisant partie de la réponse à la demande de renseignements Québecor Média(CRTC)7mai2015-11 (première ronde de demandes de renseignements) étaient inversées et/ou erronées. Vous trouverez ci-joint une version corrigée de cette réponse.

2. Conformément à l'article 39 de la Loi sur les télécommunications, et tel que mentionné à la réponse, certaines informations contenues dans cette réponse sont soumises au Conseil à titre confidentiel. Une version abrégée de cette réponse est également soumise afin d’être versée au dossier public.

3. Espérant le tout conforme, veuillez croire, Monsieur Traversy, en l’expression de notre considération distinguée.

[image: image2.png]
**** Béland

Vice-président, Affaires réglementairesTélécommunications

p.j.

c.c. Liste de distribution de la lettre du Conseil du 7 mai 2015.

VERSION ABRÉGÉE – corrigée le 21 septembre 2015RÉPONSE À UNE DEMANDE DE RENSEIGNEMENTS Québecor Média inc.

Le 14 juillet 2015

Québecor Média(CRTC)7mai2015-11 ACT 2015-134**** 1 de 2

DEMANDE

Pour mieux comprendre l'usage historique et prévu du réseau et la demande de services d'accès Internet à large bande, répondez aux questions suivantes.

a. Décrivez les diverses hypothèses techniques associées aux déploiements/améliorations du réseau, comme le pourcentage d'utilisateurs actifs (p. ex. foyers) lors des périodes de pointe et à d'autres moments de la journée, ainsi que le point culminant de leur demande d'utilisation. Indiquez la valeur utilisée pour obtenir le ratio de contention.

b. Utilisez-vous différentes hypothèses techniques quand vous planifiez les déploiements/améliorations du réseau dans différentes zones géographiques, quand vous utilisez différentes technologies ou quand différentes vitesses sont offertes aux utilisateurs finals? Si oui, expliquez ces différences.

c. Pour chaque année de 2010 à 2014, indiquez 1) l'hypothèse technique concernant le réseau pour la largeur de bande passante allouée à chaque utilisateur final, exprimée en kilobits par seconde (kb/s) (c.-à-d. le débit maximal), et 2) le volume moyen de données utilisées par utilisateur final exprimé en gigaoctets (Go) par mois.

d. Pour chaque année de 2015 à 2019, indiquez les prévisions pour les renseignements demandés dans la partie c) ci-haut.

RÉPONSE

a. Vidéotron n’utilise pas d’hypothèses techniques déterminées à l’avance au sujet du comportement d'un groupe d’usagers pour le déploiement de capacité et l’amélioration de son réseau tel que formulé dans la question. L'ajout de capacité se base plutôt sur l'observation du trafic réel de pointe pour ce groupe et sa projection déterminée en fonction des tendances réelles observées pour un groupe plus large d'usagers, typiquement sur l'ensemble du réseau. Il n’y a donc pas, à proprement parler, de ratio de contention utilisé aux fins de la planification.

b. Nous utilisons le trafic mesuré pour un secteur considéré. Les hypothèses de croissance sont les mêmes pour l'ensemble des secteurs. Vidéotron offre les mêmes vitesses dans la presque totalité de son territoire.

c.

Bande passante moyenne par utilisateur final à l’heure de pointe en kb/s 2010

###
Ø
2011
###
Ø
2012
###
Ø
2013
###
Ø
2014
###
Ø
2.

Volume moyen de données utilisées par utilisateur final en Go/mois 2010

###
Ø
2011
###
Ø
2012
###
Ø
2013
###
Ø
2014
###
Ø

VERSION ABRÉGÉE – corrigée le 21 septembre 2015RÉPONSE À UNE DEMANDE DE RENSEIGNEMENTS Québecor Média inc.

Le 14 juillet 2015

Québecor Média(CRTC)7mai2015-11 ACT 2015-134**** 2 de 2

d.

Prévision - Bande passante moyenne par utilisateur final à l’heure de pointe en kb/s 2015

###
Ø
2016
###
Ø
2017
###
Ø
2018
###
Ø
2019
###
Ø

Prévision - Volume moyen de données utilisées par utilisateur final en Go/mois 2015

###
Ø
2016
###
Ø
2017
###
Ø
2018
###
Ø
2019
###
Ø

Les informations concernant la bande passante moyenne et le volume moyen historiques et prévus des clients de Vidéotron sont soumises en confidence auprès du Conseil, conformément à l'article 39 de la Loi sur les télécommunications. Ces informations commerciales sont de nature sensible et ne sont pas divulguées généralement. Leur divulgation permettrait à des concurrents actuels ou éventuels de mieux connaître le profil des clients et la structure de coûts de l’entreprise, ce qui leur permettrait de développer des stratégies d’affaires de nature à causer un préjudice sérieux et direct à Vidéotron.

### Soumis en confidence auprès du Conseil.

Ø Corrigé
***Fin du document***

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2432360 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - Québecor - REVISÉE - Réponse corrigée à une demande ABRÉGÉE.doc
[image: image1.jpg]QUEBEC ,
Média

612, rue St-Jacques, 15e étage, **** SudMontréal (Québec) *** ***

1
Ligne directe : *-***-***-****
Télécopieur : *-***-***-****
Courriel : ******@***.com
Internet : www.quebecor.com
PIÈCE JOINTE ABRÉGÉE
Le 21 septembre 2015
Monsieur John Traversy
Secrétaire général
Conseil de la radiodiffusion et

des télécommunications canadiennesOttawa (Ontario) *** ***

Objet :

Dossier CRTC #8663-C12-201503186 – Avis de consultation de télécom CRTC 2015-134, Examen des services de télécommunication de base (ACT 2014-76) – Première ronde de demandes de renseignements – Réponse corrigée de Québecor Média inc. (Québecor Média) au nom de sa filiale Vidéotron s.e.n.c. (Vidéotron)[image: image1.jpg]

Monsieur Traversy,

1. Lors de la préparation de nos réponses à la deuxième ronde de demandes de renseignements dans le cadre de l’instance mentionnée en rubrique, nous avons découvert que des informations fournies dans les tableaux faisant partie de la réponse à la demande de renseignements Québecor Média(CRTC)7mai2015-11 (première ronde de demandes de renseignements) étaient inversées et/ou erronées. Vous trouverez ci-joint une version corrigée de cette réponse.

2. Conformément à l'article 39 de la Loi sur les télécommunications, et tel que mentionné à la réponse, certaines informations contenues dans cette réponse sont soumises au Conseil à titre confidentiel. Une version abrégée de cette réponse est également soumise afin d’être versée au dossier public.

3. Espérant le tout conforme, veuillez croire, Monsieur Traversy, en l’expression de notre considération distinguée.

[image: image2.png]
**** Béland

Vice-président, Affaires réglementairesTélécommunications

p.j.

c.c. Liste de distribution de la lettre du Conseil du 7 mai 2015.

VERSION ABRÉGÉE – corrigée le 21 septembre 2015RÉPONSE À UNE DEMANDE DE RENSEIGNEMENTS Québecor Média inc.

Le 14 juillet 2015

Québecor Média(CRTC)7mai2015-11 ACT 2015-134**** 1 de 2

DEMANDE

Pour mieux comprendre l'usage historique et prévu du réseau et la demande de services d'accès Internet à large bande, répondez aux questions suivantes.

a. Décrivez les diverses hypothèses techniques associées aux déploiements/améliorations du réseau, comme le pourcentage d'utilisateurs actifs (p. ex. foyers) lors des périodes de pointe et à d'autres moments de la journée, ainsi que le point culminant de leur demande d'utilisation. Indiquez la valeur utilisée pour obtenir le ratio de contention.

b. Utilisez-vous différentes hypothèses techniques quand vous planifiez les déploiements/améliorations du réseau dans différentes zones géographiques, quand vous utilisez différentes technologies ou quand différentes vitesses sont offertes aux utilisateurs finals? Si oui, expliquez ces différences.

c. Pour chaque année de 2010 à 2014, indiquez 1) l'hypothèse technique concernant le réseau pour la largeur de bande passante allouée à chaque utilisateur final, exprimée en kilobits par seconde (kb/s) (c.-à-d. le débit maximal), et 2) le volume moyen de données utilisées par utilisateur final exprimé en gigaoctets (Go) par mois.

d. Pour chaque année de 2015 à 2019, indiquez les prévisions pour les renseignements demandés dans la partie c) ci-haut.

RÉPONSE

a. Vidéotron n’utilise pas d’hypothèses techniques déterminées à l’avance au sujet du comportement d'un groupe d’usagers pour le déploiement de capacité et l’amélioration de son réseau tel que formulé dans la question. L'ajout de capacité se base plutôt sur l'observation du trafic réel de pointe pour ce groupe et sa projection déterminée en fonction des tendances réelles observées pour un groupe plus large d'usagers, typiquement sur l'ensemble du réseau. Il n’y a donc pas, à proprement parler, de ratio de contention utilisé aux fins de la planification.

b. Nous utilisons le trafic mesuré pour un secteur considéré. Les hypothèses de croissance sont les mêmes pour l'ensemble des secteurs. Vidéotron offre les mêmes vitesses dans la presque totalité de son territoire.

c.

Bande passante moyenne par utilisateur final à l’heure de pointe en kb/s 2010

###
Ø
2011
###
Ø
2012
###
Ø
2013
###
Ø
2014
###
Ø
2.

Volume moyen de données utilisées par utilisateur final en Go/mois 2010

###
Ø
2011
###
Ø
2012
###
Ø
2013
###
Ø
2014
###
Ø

VERSION ABRÉGÉE – corrigée le 21 septembre 2015RÉPONSE À UNE DEMANDE DE RENSEIGNEMENTS Québecor Média inc.

Le 14 juillet 2015

Québecor Média(CRTC)7mai2015-11 ACT 2015-134**** 2 de 2

d.

Prévision - Bande passante moyenne par utilisateur final à l’heure de pointe en kb/s 2015

###
Ø
2016
###
Ø
2017
###
Ø
2018
###
Ø
2019
###
Ø

Prévision - Volume moyen de données utilisées par utilisateur final en Go/mois 2015

###
Ø
2016
###
Ø
2017
###
Ø
2018
###
Ø
2019
###
Ø

Les informations concernant la bande passante moyenne et le volume moyen historiques et prévus des clients de Vidéotron sont soumises en confidence auprès du Conseil, conformément à l'article 39 de la Loi sur les télécommunications. Ces informations commerciales sont de nature sensible et ne sont pas divulguées généralement. Leur divulgation permettrait à des concurrents actuels ou éventuels de mieux connaître le profil des clients et la structure de coûts de l’entreprise, ce qui leur permettrait de développer des stratégies d’affaires de nature à causer un préjudice sérieux et direct à Vidéotron.

### Soumis en confidence auprès du Conseil.

Ø Corrigé
***Fin du document***

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2432360 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - Québecor - REVISÉE - Réponse corrigée à une demande ABRÉGÉE.doc
[image: image1.jpg]QUEBEC ,
Média

612, rue St-Jacques, 15e étage, **** SudMontréal (Québec) *** ***

1
Ligne directe : *-***-***-****
Télécopieur : *-***-***-****
Courriel : ******@***.com
Internet : www.quebecor.com
PIÈCE JOINTE ABRÉGÉE
Le 21 septembre 2015
Monsieur John Traversy
Secrétaire général
Conseil de la radiodiffusion et

des télécommunications canadiennesOttawa (Ontario) *** ***

Objet :

Dossier CRTC #8663-C12-201503186 – Avis de consultation de télécom CRTC 2015-134, Examen des services de télécommunication de base (ACT 2014-76) – Première ronde de demandes de renseignements – Réponse corrigée de Québecor Média inc. (Québecor Média) au nom de sa filiale Vidéotron s.e.n.c. (Vidéotron)[image: image1.jpg]

Monsieur Traversy,

1. Lors de la préparation de nos réponses à la deuxième ronde de demandes de renseignements dans le cadre de l’instance mentionnée en rubrique, nous avons découvert que des informations fournies dans les tableaux faisant partie de la réponse à la demande de renseignements Québecor Média(CRTC)7mai2015-11 (première ronde de demandes de renseignements) étaient inversées et/ou erronées. Vous trouverez ci-joint une version corrigée de cette réponse.

2. Conformément à l'article 39 de la Loi sur les télécommunications, et tel que mentionné à la réponse, certaines informations contenues dans cette réponse sont soumises au Conseil à titre confidentiel. Une version abrégée de cette réponse est également soumise afin d’être versée au dossier public.

3. Espérant le tout conforme, veuillez croire, Monsieur Traversy, en l’expression de notre considération distinguée.

[image: image2.png]
**** Béland

Vice-président, Affaires réglementairesTélécommunications

p.j.

c.c. Liste de distribution de la lettre du Conseil du 7 mai 2015.

VERSION ABRÉGÉE – corrigée le 21 septembre 2015RÉPONSE À UNE DEMANDE DE RENSEIGNEMENTS Québecor Média inc.

Le 14 juillet 2015

Québecor Média(CRTC)7mai2015-11 ACT 2015-134**** 1 de 2

DEMANDE

Pour mieux comprendre l'usage historique et prévu du réseau et la demande de services d'accès Internet à large bande, répondez aux questions suivantes.

a. Décrivez les diverses hypothèses techniques associées aux déploiements/améliorations du réseau, comme le pourcentage d'utilisateurs actifs (p. ex. foyers) lors des périodes de pointe et à d'autres moments de la journée, ainsi que le point culminant de leur demande d'utilisation. Indiquez la valeur utilisée pour obtenir le ratio de contention.

b. Utilisez-vous différentes hypothèses techniques quand vous planifiez les déploiements/améliorations du réseau dans différentes zones géographiques, quand vous utilisez différentes technologies ou quand différentes vitesses sont offertes aux utilisateurs finals? Si oui, expliquez ces différences.

c. Pour chaque année de 2010 à 2014, indiquez 1) l'hypothèse technique concernant le réseau pour la largeur de bande passante allouée à chaque utilisateur final, exprimée en kilobits par seconde (kb/s) (c.-à-d. le débit maximal), et 2) le volume moyen de données utilisées par utilisateur final exprimé en gigaoctets (Go) par mois.

d. Pour chaque année de 2015 à 2019, indiquez les prévisions pour les renseignements demandés dans la partie c) ci-haut.

RÉPONSE

a. Vidéotron n’utilise pas d’hypothèses techniques déterminées à l’avance au sujet du comportement d'un groupe d’usagers pour le déploiement de capacité et l’amélioration de son réseau tel que formulé dans la question. L'ajout de capacité se base plutôt sur l'observation du trafic réel de pointe pour ce groupe et sa projection déterminée en fonction des tendances réelles observées pour un groupe plus large d'usagers, typiquement sur l'ensemble du réseau. Il n’y a donc pas, à proprement parler, de ratio de contention utilisé aux fins de la planification.

b. Nous utilisons le trafic mesuré pour un secteur considéré. Les hypothèses de croissance sont les mêmes pour l'ensemble des secteurs. Vidéotron offre les mêmes vitesses dans la presque totalité de son territoire.

c.

Bande passante moyenne par utilisateur final à l’heure de pointe en kb/s 2010

###
Ø
2011
###
Ø
2012
###
Ø
2013
###
Ø
2014
###
Ø
2.

Volume moyen de données utilisées par utilisateur final en Go/mois 2010

###
Ø
2011
###
Ø
2012
###
Ø
2013
###
Ø
2014
###
Ø

VERSION ABRÉGÉE – corrigée le 21 septembre 2015RÉPONSE À UNE DEMANDE DE RENSEIGNEMENTS Québecor Média inc.

Le 14 juillet 2015

Québecor Média(CRTC)7mai2015-11 ACT 2015-134**** 2 de 2

d.

Prévision - Bande passante moyenne par utilisateur final à l’heure de pointe en kb/s 2015

###
Ø
2016
###
Ø
2017
###
Ø
2018
###
Ø
2019
###
Ø

Prévision - Volume moyen de données utilisées par utilisateur final en Go/mois 2015

###
Ø
2016
###
Ø
2017
###
Ø
2018
###
Ø
2019
###
Ø

Les informations concernant la bande passante moyenne et le volume moyen historiques et prévus des clients de Vidéotron sont soumises en confidence auprès du Conseil, conformément à l'article 39 de la Loi sur les télécommunications. Ces informations commerciales sont de nature sensible et ne sont pas divulguées généralement. Leur divulgation permettrait à des concurrents actuels ou éventuels de mieux connaître le profil des clients et la structure de coûts de l’entreprise, ce qui leur permettrait de développer des stratégies d’affaires de nature à causer un préjudice sérieux et direct à Vidéotron.

### Soumis en confidence auprès du Conseil.

Ø Corrigé
***Fin du document***

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2432360 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - Québecor - REVISÉE - Réponse corrigée à une demande ABRÉGÉE.doc
[image: image1.jpg]QUEBEC ,
Média

612, rue St-Jacques, 15e étage, **** SudMontréal (Québec) *** ***

1
Ligne directe : *-***-***-****
Télécopieur : *-***-***-****
Courriel : ******@***.com
Internet : www.quebecor.com
PIÈCE JOINTE ABRÉGÉE
Le 21 septembre 2015
Monsieur John Traversy
Secrétaire général
Conseil de la radiodiffusion et

des télécommunications canadiennesOttawa (Ontario) *** ***

Objet :

Dossier CRTC #8663-C12-201503186 – Avis de consultation de télécom CRTC 2015-134, Examen des services de télécommunication de base (ACT 2014-76) – Première ronde de demandes de renseignements – Réponse corrigée de Québecor Média inc. (Québecor Média) au nom de sa filiale Vidéotron s.e.n.c. (Vidéotron)[image: image1.jpg]

Monsieur Traversy,

1. Lors de la préparation de nos réponses à la deuxième ronde de demandes de renseignements dans le cadre de l’instance mentionnée en rubrique, nous avons découvert que des informations fournies dans les tableaux faisant partie de la réponse à la demande de renseignements Québecor Média(CRTC)7mai2015-11 (première ronde de demandes de renseignements) étaient inversées et/ou erronées. Vous trouverez ci-joint une version corrigée de cette réponse.

2. Conformément à l'article 39 de la Loi sur les télécommunications, et tel que mentionné à la réponse, certaines informations contenues dans cette réponse sont soumises au Conseil à titre confidentiel. Une version abrégée de cette réponse est également soumise afin d’être versée au dossier public.

3. Espérant le tout conforme, veuillez croire, Monsieur Traversy, en l’expression de notre considération distinguée.

[image: image2.png]
**** Béland

Vice-président, Affaires réglementairesTélécommunications

p.j.

c.c. Liste de distribution de la lettre du Conseil du 7 mai 2015.

VERSION ABRÉGÉE – corrigée le 21 septembre 2015RÉPONSE À UNE DEMANDE DE RENSEIGNEMENTS Québecor Média inc.

Le 14 juillet 2015

Québecor Média(CRTC)7mai2015-11 ACT 2015-134**** 1 de 2

DEMANDE

Pour mieux comprendre l'usage historique et prévu du réseau et la demande de services d'accès Internet à large bande, répondez aux questions suivantes.

a. Décrivez les diverses hypothèses techniques associées aux déploiements/améliorations du réseau, comme le pourcentage d'utilisateurs actifs (p. ex. foyers) lors des périodes de pointe et à d'autres moments de la journée, ainsi que le point culminant de leur demande d'utilisation. Indiquez la valeur utilisée pour obtenir le ratio de contention.

b. Utilisez-vous différentes hypothèses techniques quand vous planifiez les déploiements/améliorations du réseau dans différentes zones géographiques, quand vous utilisez différentes technologies ou quand différentes vitesses sont offertes aux utilisateurs finals? Si oui, expliquez ces différences.

c. Pour chaque année de 2010 à 2014, indiquez 1) l'hypothèse technique concernant le réseau pour la largeur de bande passante allouée à chaque utilisateur final, exprimée en kilobits par seconde (kb/s) (c.-à-d. le débit maximal), et 2) le volume moyen de données utilisées par utilisateur final exprimé en gigaoctets (Go) par mois.

d. Pour chaque année de 2015 à 2019, indiquez les prévisions pour les renseignements demandés dans la partie c) ci-haut.

RÉPONSE

a. Vidéotron n’utilise pas d’hypothèses techniques déterminées à l’avance au sujet du comportement d'un groupe d’usagers pour le déploiement de capacité et l’amélioration de son réseau tel que formulé dans la question. L'ajout de capacité se base plutôt sur l'observation du trafic réel de pointe pour ce groupe et sa projection déterminée en fonction des tendances réelles observées pour un groupe plus large d'usagers, typiquement sur l'ensemble du réseau. Il n’y a donc pas, à proprement parler, de ratio de contention utilisé aux fins de la planification.

b. Nous utilisons le trafic mesuré pour un secteur considéré. Les hypothèses de croissance sont les mêmes pour l'ensemble des secteurs. Vidéotron offre les mêmes vitesses dans la presque totalité de son territoire.

c.

Bande passante moyenne par utilisateur final à l’heure de pointe en kb/s 2010

###
Ø
2011
###
Ø
2012
###
Ø
2013
###
Ø
2014
###
Ø
2.

Volume moyen de données utilisées par utilisateur final en Go/mois 2010

###
Ø
2011
###
Ø
2012
###
Ø
2013
###
Ø
2014
###
Ø

VERSION ABRÉGÉE – corrigée le 21 septembre 2015RÉPONSE À UNE DEMANDE DE RENSEIGNEMENTS Québecor Média inc.

Le 14 juillet 2015

Québecor Média(CRTC)7mai2015-11 ACT 2015-134**** 2 de 2

d.

Prévision - Bande passante moyenne par utilisateur final à l’heure de pointe en kb/s 2015

###
Ø
2016
###
Ø
2017
###
Ø
2018
###
Ø
2019
###
Ø

Prévision - Volume moyen de données utilisées par utilisateur final en Go/mois 2015

###
Ø
2016
###
Ø
2017
###
Ø
2018
###
Ø
2019
###
Ø

Les informations concernant la bande passante moyenne et le volume moyen historiques et prévus des clients de Vidéotron sont soumises en confidence auprès du Conseil, conformément à l'article 39 de la Loi sur les télécommunications. Ces informations commerciales sont de nature sensible et ne sont pas divulguées généralement. Leur divulgation permettrait à des concurrents actuels ou éventuels de mieux connaître le profil des clients et la structure de coûts de l’entreprise, ce qui leur permettrait de développer des stratégies d’affaires de nature à causer un préjudice sérieux et direct à Vidéotron.

### Soumis en confidence auprès du Conseil.

Ø Corrigé
***Fin du document***

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2395610 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - 150714-The Companies-TNC 2015-134 - RFI - Letter.doc
2015 07 14
2
[image: image1.png]
File No. 8663-C12-201503186
2015 07 14
To:
Mr. John Traversy
Secretary General
Canadian Radio-television and
Telecommunications Commission
Ottawa, Ontario
*** ***
Subject:

Telecom Notice of Consultation CRTC 2015-134, Review of basic telecommunications services (TNC 2015-134) – Responses to Requests for Information**** Mr. Traversy,

1. Bell Canada, on its own behalf, and on behalf of its affiliates, welcomes this opportunity to participate in this hearing and notes our support for the Commission's commitment to ensuring Canadians have access to the services they need to meaningfully participate in Canada's digital economy. Pursuant to the procedures established in the Commission’s Staff letter dated 7 May 2015 requesting certain information from us and as amended in a letter dated 28 May 2015, please find attached our responses to Commission Staff's requests for information.

2. Certain information contained in these responses to request for information is filed in confidence with the Commission pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act and the directions provided by the Commission in the Broadcasting and Telecom Information Bulletin (BTIB) CRTC 2010‑961. In particular, the information which we have provided in confidence represents competitively sensitive information which the Commission has indicated should be treated as confidential. Release of this information on the public record would provide existing or potential competitors with invaluable competitively-sensitive information that would not otherwise be available to them, and which would enable them to develop more effective business strategies. Release of such information could prejudice our competitive position resulting in material financial loss and cause us specific direct harm. Abridged versions of these responses to requests for information are being provided for the public record. In certain cases, such as the provision of mapping information, abridged versions of the appendices to the intervention would provide no meaningful information for the public record, therefore no abridged versions are being provided.

Yours truly,
[ Original signed by P. **** ]
**** Gauvin
Senior Legal Counsel
Attachments
c.c.:
Interested Parties to TNC 2015-134
John Macri, CRTC
**** Bailey, CRTC
*** End of Document ***

� Specifically, Bell Canada is filing on behalf of Bell Aliant Regional Communications, Limited Partnership (which effective 1 July 2015 was wound-up into Bell Canada, and is now operated as a division of Bell Canada), Bell Canada, Bell Mobility Inc., Câblevision du Nord du Québec inc. (CVQ), DMTS, KMTS, NorthernTel, Limited Partnership, Northwestel Inc., Ontera and Télébec, Société en commandite.

� BTIB 2010-961, Procedures for filing confidential information and requesting its disclosure in Commission proceedings, dated 23 December 2010, as amended in BTIB 2010-961-1, dated 26 October 2012 to reflect the directives in Telecom Regulatory Policy CRTC 2012-592, Confidentiality of information used to establish wholesale service rates.

Bell Canada
**** Gauvin
Floor 19
160 Elgin ****
Ottawa, Ontario *** ***
Telephone: (613) 785-6286
Facsimile: (613) 560-0472
******@***.com

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2395610 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - 150714-The Companies-TNC 2015-134 - RFI - Letter.doc
2015 07 14
2
[image: image1.png]
File No. 8663-C12-201503186
2015 07 14
To:
Mr. John Traversy
Secretary General
Canadian Radio-television and
Telecommunications Commission
Ottawa, Ontario
*** ***
Subject:

Telecom Notice of Consultation CRTC 2015-134, Review of basic telecommunications services (TNC 2015-134) – Responses to Requests for Information**** Mr. Traversy,

1. Bell Canada, on its own behalf, and on behalf of its affiliates, welcomes this opportunity to participate in this hearing and notes our support for the Commission's commitment to ensuring Canadians have access to the services they need to meaningfully participate in Canada's digital economy. Pursuant to the procedures established in the Commission’s Staff letter dated 7 May 2015 requesting certain information from us and as amended in a letter dated 28 May 2015, please find attached our responses to Commission Staff's requests for information.

2. Certain information contained in these responses to request for information is filed in confidence with the Commission pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act and the directions provided by the Commission in the Broadcasting and Telecom Information Bulletin (BTIB) CRTC 2010‑961. In particular, the information which we have provided in confidence represents competitively sensitive information which the Commission has indicated should be treated as confidential. Release of this information on the public record would provide existing or potential competitors with invaluable competitively-sensitive information that would not otherwise be available to them, and which would enable them to develop more effective business strategies. Release of such information could prejudice our competitive position resulting in material financial loss and cause us specific direct harm. Abridged versions of these responses to requests for information are being provided for the public record. In certain cases, such as the provision of mapping information, abridged versions of the appendices to the intervention would provide no meaningful information for the public record, therefore no abridged versions are being provided.

Yours truly,
[ Original signed by P. **** ]
**** Gauvin
Senior Legal Counsel
Attachments
c.c.:
Interested Parties to TNC 2015-134
John Macri, CRTC
**** Bailey, CRTC
*** End of Document ***

� Specifically, Bell Canada is filing on behalf of Bell Aliant Regional Communications, Limited Partnership (which effective 1 July 2015 was wound-up into Bell Canada, and is now operated as a division of Bell Canada), Bell Canada, Bell Mobility Inc., Câblevision du Nord du Québec inc. (CVQ), DMTS, KMTS, NorthernTel, Limited Partnership, Northwestel Inc., Ontera and Télébec, Société en commandite.

� BTIB 2010-961, Procedures for filing confidential information and requesting its disclosure in Commission proceedings, dated 23 December 2010, as amended in BTIB 2010-961-1, dated 26 October 2012 to reflect the directives in Telecom Regulatory Policy CRTC 2012-592, Confidentiality of information used to establish wholesale service rates.

Bell Canada
**** Gauvin
Floor 19
160 Elgin ****
Ottawa, Ontario *** ***
Telephone: (613) 785-6286
Facsimile: (613) 560-0472
******@***.com

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2395610 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - 150714-The Companies-TNC 2015-134 - RFI - Letter.doc
2015 07 14
2
[image: image1.png]
File No. 8663-C12-201503186
2015 07 14
To:
Mr. John Traversy
Secretary General
Canadian Radio-television and
Telecommunications Commission
Ottawa, Ontario
*** ***
Subject:

Telecom Notice of Consultation CRTC 2015-134, Review of basic telecommunications services (TNC 2015-134) – Responses to Requests for Information**** Mr. Traversy,

1. Bell Canada, on its own behalf, and on behalf of its affiliates, welcomes this opportunity to participate in this hearing and notes our support for the Commission's commitment to ensuring Canadians have access to the services they need to meaningfully participate in Canada's digital economy. Pursuant to the procedures established in the Commission’s Staff letter dated 7 May 2015 requesting certain information from us and as amended in a letter dated 28 May 2015, please find attached our responses to Commission Staff's requests for information.

2. Certain information contained in these responses to request for information is filed in confidence with the Commission pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act and the directions provided by the Commission in the Broadcasting and Telecom Information Bulletin (BTIB) CRTC 2010‑961. In particular, the information which we have provided in confidence represents competitively sensitive information which the Commission has indicated should be treated as confidential. Release of this information on the public record would provide existing or potential competitors with invaluable competitively-sensitive information that would not otherwise be available to them, and which would enable them to develop more effective business strategies. Release of such information could prejudice our competitive position resulting in material financial loss and cause us specific direct harm. Abridged versions of these responses to requests for information are being provided for the public record. In certain cases, such as the provision of mapping information, abridged versions of the appendices to the intervention would provide no meaningful information for the public record, therefore no abridged versions are being provided.

Yours truly,
[ Original signed by P. **** ]
**** Gauvin
Senior Legal Counsel
Attachments
c.c.:
Interested Parties to TNC 2015-134
John Macri, CRTC
**** Bailey, CRTC
*** End of Document ***

� Specifically, Bell Canada is filing on behalf of Bell Aliant Regional Communications, Limited Partnership (which effective 1 July 2015 was wound-up into Bell Canada, and is now operated as a division of Bell Canada), Bell Canada, Bell Mobility Inc., Câblevision du Nord du Québec inc. (CVQ), DMTS, KMTS, NorthernTel, Limited Partnership, Northwestel Inc., Ontera and Télébec, Société en commandite.

� BTIB 2010-961, Procedures for filing confidential information and requesting its disclosure in Commission proceedings, dated 23 December 2010, as amended in BTIB 2010-961-1, dated 26 October 2012 to reflect the directives in Telecom Regulatory Policy CRTC 2012-592, Confidentiality of information used to establish wholesale service rates.

Bell Canada
**** Gauvin
Floor 19
160 Elgin ****
Ottawa, Ontario *** ***
Telephone: (613) 785-6286
Facsimile: (613) 560-0472
******@***.com

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2395610 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - 150714-The Companies-TNC 2015-134 - RFI - Letter.doc
2015 07 14
2
[image: image1.png]
File No. 8663-C12-201503186
2015 07 14
To:
Mr. John Traversy
Secretary General
Canadian Radio-television and
Telecommunications Commission
Ottawa, Ontario
*** ***
Subject:

Telecom Notice of Consultation CRTC 2015-134, Review of basic telecommunications services (TNC 2015-134) – Responses to Requests for Information**** Mr. Traversy,

1. Bell Canada, on its own behalf, and on behalf of its affiliates, welcomes this opportunity to participate in this hearing and notes our support for the Commission's commitment to ensuring Canadians have access to the services they need to meaningfully participate in Canada's digital economy. Pursuant to the procedures established in the Commission’s Staff letter dated 7 May 2015 requesting certain information from us and as amended in a letter dated 28 May 2015, please find attached our responses to Commission Staff's requests for information.

2. Certain information contained in these responses to request for information is filed in confidence with the Commission pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act and the directions provided by the Commission in the Broadcasting and Telecom Information Bulletin (BTIB) CRTC 2010‑961. In particular, the information which we have provided in confidence represents competitively sensitive information which the Commission has indicated should be treated as confidential. Release of this information on the public record would provide existing or potential competitors with invaluable competitively-sensitive information that would not otherwise be available to them, and which would enable them to develop more effective business strategies. Release of such information could prejudice our competitive position resulting in material financial loss and cause us specific direct harm. Abridged versions of these responses to requests for information are being provided for the public record. In certain cases, such as the provision of mapping information, abridged versions of the appendices to the intervention would provide no meaningful information for the public record, therefore no abridged versions are being provided.

Yours truly,
[ Original signed by P. **** ]
**** Gauvin
Senior Legal Counsel
Attachments
c.c.:
Interested Parties to TNC 2015-134
John Macri, CRTC
**** Bailey, CRTC
*** End of Document ***

� Specifically, Bell Canada is filing on behalf of Bell Aliant Regional Communications, Limited Partnership (which effective 1 July 2015 was wound-up into Bell Canada, and is now operated as a division of Bell Canada), Bell Canada, Bell Mobility Inc., Câblevision du Nord du Québec inc. (CVQ), DMTS, KMTS, NorthernTel, Limited Partnership, Northwestel Inc., Ontera and Télébec, Société en commandite.

� BTIB 2010-961, Procedures for filing confidential information and requesting its disclosure in Commission proceedings, dated 23 December 2010, as amended in BTIB 2010-961-1, dated 26 October 2012 to reflect the directives in Telecom Regulatory Policy CRTC 2012-592, Confidentiality of information used to establish wholesale service rates.

Bell Canada
**** Gauvin
Floor 19
160 Elgin ****
Ottawa, Ontario *** ***
Telephone: (613) 785-6286
Facsimile: (613) 560-0472
******@***.com

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2394909 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - Primus(CRTC)7May15-11 TNC 2015-134 Abridged.pdf

Primus Telecommunications Canada Inc. Response to Interrogatory 14 July 2015 Primus(CRTC)7Apr15-11 TNC 2015-134 Abridged

**** 1 of 2
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. To better understand historical and projected network utilization and demand for broadband Internet access services, provide responses to the following questions.

a) Describe the various engineering assumptions associated with network deployments/upgrades, such as percentage of active users (i.e. households) at peak periods and at other times of day, as well as their peak usage demands. Provide the oversubscription ratios used.

b) Are different engineering assumptions utilized when planning network deployments/upgrades in different geographic areas, when different technologies are used, or where different speed tiers are offered to end users? If yes, please explain these differences.

c) For each of the years 2010 to 2014, provide 1) the network engineering assumption for throughput bandwidth allocated to each end user expressed in kilobits per second (kbps) (i.e.

engineered throughput), and 2) the average volume of data used per end user expressed in gigabytes (GB) per month.

d) For each of the years 2015 to 2019, provide the forecasts for the information requested in part c) above.

A. Primus is filing this interrogatory response in confidence with the Commission pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act. The information for which confidentiality is being claimed contains commercially sensitive information regarding the operation of Primus’ network. This commercially sensitive information is consistently treated as confidential by Primus, the disclosure of which could prejudice the competitive position of Primus. Primus would suffer specific and direct harm if the information were to be disclosed. An abridged version is provided for the public record.

a) Primus’ prevailing engineering assumption with respect to network deployments/upgrades is to maintain the # percentile of overall usage at or below # of total network capacity. To this end Primus models forecasted end-user peak period data usage and monitors traffic over its interconnecting circuits to gauge actual peak period end-user data usage on an ongoing basis. Primus manages its physical capacity and predetermined # Filed with the Commission in confidence Primus(CRTC)7Apr15-11 TNC 2015-134

Confidential
**** 2 of 2

CBB capacity (where applicable), and will augment its interconnecting circuits with additional physical or CBB capacity in accordance with the internal threshold identified above. # #

#
#
#

b) # #

#

c) The engineered throughput to each end user expressed in kbps per second and the average volume of data used per end user expressed in GB per month for each of the years 2010 to 2014 is shown in the following chart:

d) Forecasts for the information requested in part c) above for each of the years 2015 to 2019 are provided in the following chart:

# Filed with the Commission in confidence.

***End of Document ***
Year Month Avg kbps Avg GB
2010 May # #
2011 May # #
2012 May # #
2013 May # #
2014 May # #
Year Month Avg kbps Avg GB
2015 May # #
2016 May # #
2017 May # #
2018 May # #
2019 May # #

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2394909 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - Primus(CRTC)7May15-11 TNC 2015-134 Abridged.pdf

Primus Telecommunications Canada Inc. Response to Interrogatory 14 July 2015 Primus(CRTC)7Apr15-11 TNC 2015-134 Abridged

**** 1 of 2
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. To better understand historical and projected network utilization and demand for broadband Internet access services, provide responses to the following questions.

a) Describe the various engineering assumptions associated with network deployments/upgrades, such as percentage of active users (i.e. households) at peak periods and at other times of day, as well as their peak usage demands. Provide the oversubscription ratios used.

b) Are different engineering assumptions utilized when planning network deployments/upgrades in different geographic areas, when different technologies are used, or where different speed tiers are offered to end users? If yes, please explain these differences.

c) For each of the years 2010 to 2014, provide 1) the network engineering assumption for throughput bandwidth allocated to each end user expressed in kilobits per second (kbps) (i.e.

engineered throughput), and 2) the average volume of data used per end user expressed in gigabytes (GB) per month.

d) For each of the years 2015 to 2019, provide the forecasts for the information requested in part c) above.

A. Primus is filing this interrogatory response in confidence with the Commission pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act. The information for which confidentiality is being claimed contains commercially sensitive information regarding the operation of Primus’ network. This commercially sensitive information is consistently treated as confidential by Primus, the disclosure of which could prejudice the competitive position of Primus. Primus would suffer specific and direct harm if the information were to be disclosed. An abridged version is provided for the public record.

a) Primus’ prevailing engineering assumption with respect to network deployments/upgrades is to maintain the # percentile of overall usage at or below # of total network capacity. To this end Primus models forecasted end-user peak period data usage and monitors traffic over its interconnecting circuits to gauge actual peak period end-user data usage on an ongoing basis. Primus manages its physical capacity and predetermined # Filed with the Commission in confidence Primus(CRTC)7Apr15-11 TNC 2015-134

Confidential
**** 2 of 2

CBB capacity (where applicable), and will augment its interconnecting circuits with additional physical or CBB capacity in accordance with the internal threshold identified above. # #

#
#
#

b) # #

#

c) The engineered throughput to each end user expressed in kbps per second and the average volume of data used per end user expressed in GB per month for each of the years 2010 to 2014 is shown in the following chart:

d) Forecasts for the information requested in part c) above for each of the years 2015 to 2019 are provided in the following chart:

# Filed with the Commission in confidence.

***End of Document ***
Year Month Avg kbps Avg GB
2010 May # #
2011 May # #
2012 May # #
2013 May # #
2014 May # #
Year Month Avg kbps Avg GB
2015 May # #
2016 May # #
2017 May # #
2018 May # #
2019 May # #

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2394909 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - Primus(CRTC)7May15-11 TNC 2015-134 Abridged.pdf

Primus Telecommunications Canada Inc. Response to Interrogatory 14 July 2015 Primus(CRTC)7Apr15-11 TNC 2015-134 Abridged

**** 1 of 2
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. To better understand historical and projected network utilization and demand for broadband Internet access services, provide responses to the following questions.

a) Describe the various engineering assumptions associated with network deployments/upgrades, such as percentage of active users (i.e. households) at peak periods and at other times of day, as well as their peak usage demands. Provide the oversubscription ratios used.

b) Are different engineering assumptions utilized when planning network deployments/upgrades in different geographic areas, when different technologies are used, or where different speed tiers are offered to end users? If yes, please explain these differences.

c) For each of the years 2010 to 2014, provide 1) the network engineering assumption for throughput bandwidth allocated to each end user expressed in kilobits per second (kbps) (i.e.

engineered throughput), and 2) the average volume of data used per end user expressed in gigabytes (GB) per month.

d) For each of the years 2015 to 2019, provide the forecasts for the information requested in part c) above.

A. Primus is filing this interrogatory response in confidence with the Commission pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act. The information for which confidentiality is being claimed contains commercially sensitive information regarding the operation of Primus’ network. This commercially sensitive information is consistently treated as confidential by Primus, the disclosure of which could prejudice the competitive position of Primus. Primus would suffer specific and direct harm if the information were to be disclosed. An abridged version is provided for the public record.

a) Primus’ prevailing engineering assumption with respect to network deployments/upgrades is to maintain the # percentile of overall usage at or below # of total network capacity. To this end Primus models forecasted end-user peak period data usage and monitors traffic over its interconnecting circuits to gauge actual peak period end-user data usage on an ongoing basis. Primus manages its physical capacity and predetermined # Filed with the Commission in confidence Primus(CRTC)7Apr15-11 TNC 2015-134

Confidential
**** 2 of 2

CBB capacity (where applicable), and will augment its interconnecting circuits with additional physical or CBB capacity in accordance with the internal threshold identified above. # #

#
#
#

b) # #

#

c) The engineered throughput to each end user expressed in kbps per second and the average volume of data used per end user expressed in GB per month for each of the years 2010 to 2014 is shown in the following chart:

d) Forecasts for the information requested in part c) above for each of the years 2015 to 2019 are provided in the following chart:

# Filed with the Commission in confidence.

***End of Document ***
Year Month Avg kbps Avg GB
2010 May # #
2011 May # #
2012 May # #
2013 May # #
2014 May # #
Year Month Avg kbps Avg GB
2015 May # #
2016 May # #
2017 May # #
2018 May # #
2019 May # #

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2394909 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - Primus(CRTC)7May15-11 TNC 2015-134 Abridged.pdf

Primus Telecommunications Canada Inc. Response to Interrogatory 14 July 2015 Primus(CRTC)7Apr15-11 TNC 2015-134 Abridged

**** 1 of 2
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY

CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Q. To better understand historical and projected network utilization and demand for broadband Internet access services, provide responses to the following questions.

a) Describe the various engineering assumptions associated with network deployments/upgrades, such as percentage of active users (i.e. households) at peak periods and at other times of day, as well as their peak usage demands. Provide the oversubscription ratios used.

b) Are different engineering assumptions utilized when planning network deployments/upgrades in different geographic areas, when different technologies are used, or where different speed tiers are offered to end users? If yes, please explain these differences.

c) For each of the years 2010 to 2014, provide 1) the network engineering assumption for throughput bandwidth allocated to each end user expressed in kilobits per second (kbps) (i.e.

engineered throughput), and 2) the average volume of data used per end user expressed in gigabytes (GB) per month.

d) For each of the years 2015 to 2019, provide the forecasts for the information requested in part c) above.

A. Primus is filing this interrogatory response in confidence with the Commission pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act. The information for which confidentiality is being claimed contains commercially sensitive information regarding the operation of Primus’ network. This commercially sensitive information is consistently treated as confidential by Primus, the disclosure of which could prejudice the competitive position of Primus. Primus would suffer specific and direct harm if the information were to be disclosed. An abridged version is provided for the public record.

a) Primus’ prevailing engineering assumption with respect to network deployments/upgrades is to maintain the # percentile of overall usage at or below # of total network capacity. To this end Primus models forecasted end-user peak period data usage and monitors traffic over its interconnecting circuits to gauge actual peak period end-user data usage on an ongoing basis. Primus manages its physical capacity and predetermined # Filed with the Commission in confidence Primus(CRTC)7Apr15-11 TNC 2015-134

Confidential
**** 2 of 2

CBB capacity (where applicable), and will augment its interconnecting circuits with additional physical or CBB capacity in accordance with the internal threshold identified above. # #

#
#
#

b) # #

#

c) The engineered throughput to each end user expressed in kbps per second and the average volume of data used per end user expressed in GB per month for each of the years 2010 to 2014 is shown in the following chart:

d) Forecasts for the information requested in part c) above for each of the years 2015 to 2019 are provided in the following chart:

# Filed with the Commission in confidence.

***End of Document ***
Year Month Avg kbps Avg GB
2010 May # #
2011 May # #
2012 May # #
2013 May # #
2014 May # #
Year Month Avg kbps Avg GB
2015 May # #
2016 May # #
2017 May # #
2018 May # #
2019 May # #

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2396359 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - Hay_Communications_RFI_Responses_14Jul2015_ABRIDGED.xls
CRTC-1
Hay Communications Abridged
Wireline & Mobile Wireless Service Providers

SILEC Territory as of December 2014 Non-SILEC Operations as of December 2014 Subscribers to lowest Priced Wireline Voice Service Subscribers to lowest Priced Postpaid Mobile Wireless Voice Plan Subscribers to lowest Priced Wireline Voice Service Subscribers to lowest Priced Postpaid Mobile Wireless Voice Plan # of customers located in HCSA # See note # See note % of customers located in HCSA # #

# of customers located in non-HCSA # #
% of customers located in non-HCSA # #
Non Discounted **** # #
Additional Monthly Charges

Description of each service offering (ex: optional services or enhanced features; number of local minutes, long distance minutes, text messages, etc) Call Waiting (3.00), Call Forwarding ($3.00), 3 way calling ($3.00), **** calling ($3.00), Call Display ($5.00), Call Answer ($2.95)

**** distance plans available: 3 cents/min #

**** available throughout Province? Y or N (if N, provide reason) No - geographic limitations No - geographic limitations Notes:

1) For information related to wireless services, please see the submission of Bell Canada. We have sublicensed our wireless spectrum to Bell Mobility and act as agents on their behalf.

CRTC-2
Hay Communications
Mobile Wireless Services Providers
Prepaid Wireless Voice Plan
Lowest priced plan as of Dec 2014 See Note

Description of each service offering (ex: per call connection, roll over minutes, other associated charges) **** per minute - local call

Description of each service offering (ex: optional services or enhanced features; number of local minutes, long distance minutes, text messages, etc) Plan offered throughout Province? Y or N (if N, provide reason) Note:

1) For information related to wireless services, please see the submission of Bell Canada. We have sublicensed our wireless spectrum to Bell Mobility and act as agents on their behalf.

CRTC-3
Hay Communications Abridged
Internet Service Providers

SILEC Territory - Subscribed to plan closest to the Commissions target speed of 5 Mbps download & 1 Mbps upload Non-SILEC Operations - Subscribed to plan closest to the Commissions target speed of 5 Mbps download & 1 Mbps upload Number of residential customers (as of Dec 2014) # # % of residential customers (as of Dec 2014) # # % of customers in HCSA # #

% of customers in non-HCSA # #
Non Discounted **** # #

Description of plan (speed, data cap, overage charge) # # **** available throughout Province? Y or N (if N, provide reason) No - geographic limitations No - geographic limitationsCRTC-4

Hay Communications

Mobile Wireless Service Providers HCSA non-HCSA Residential Customers - Mobile Wireless Service 5 most popular features Description **** Additional Costs % # % # 1 See note

2
3
4
5
Note:

1) For information related to wireless services, please see the submission of Bell Canada. We have sublicensed our wireless spectrum to Bell Mobility and act as agents on their behalf.

CRTC-5
Hay Communications Abridged
TSPs HCSA non-HCSA

Residential Customers 3 most popular wireline voice plans Description **** - Non-discounted Additional Costs % # % # 1 Residential phone service Primary exchange service 23.5 BRS (0.13) and 911 (0.24) # # 0 0 2 Residential phone service Primary exchange service-CLEC # BRS (0.13) and 911 (0.24) # # 0 0 3 we only have 2 wireline voice plans

HCSA non-HCSA

Residential Customers 3 most popular wireline Internet Plans Description **** - Non-discounted Additional Costs % # % # 1 # # # # # 0 0

2 # # # # # 0 0
3 # # # # # 0 0
CRTC-6
Hay Communications

Wireline, mobile wireless, fixed wireless and/or satellite direct to home Internet service providers Residential Customers for 2014 Monthly Average Usage (GB) Wireline Internet Service not available

Mobile Wireless Internet Service not available
CRTC-7
Hay Communications Abridged
TSPs
For the Year 2014

Service Service Offering/Initiatives - discounted for affordability (seniors, students..) % Customers using offers and initaitives # of Customers using offers and initiatives Wireline Voice Standard CRTC mandated tools # # Mobile Wireless voice none

Wireline Internet none
Mobile Wireless Internet none
Fixed Wireless Internet none
Satellite Internet none
CRTC-8
Hay Communications Abridged
TSPs

SILEC Territory - Capable of Serving SILEC -Territory Being Served SILEC Territory - Hitting Target 5Mbps/1Mbps Non-SILEC Operations - Capable of Serving Non-SILEC Operations - Being Served Non-SILEC Operations - Hitting Target 5Mbps/1Mbps (Speed actually being delivered) # of Households

# # # # # # #
CRTC-9
Hay Communications Abridged
TSPs

With respect to your company's operating territory, provide the following information for areas that are currently unserved or underserved as of Dec 2014.

SILEC Operating Territory

Technologies used in the access facilities for serving subscribers: Unserved - Average Upstream Speeds Offered Unserved - Average Downstream Speeds Offered Underserved - Average Upstream Speeds Offered Underserved - Average Downstream Speeds Offered n/a all SILEC areas are served

Average Capacities (Mpbs) Average Capacities (Mpbs) Technologies used for connecting to the PoP: Unserved to PoP Unserved from PoP Underserved to PoP Underserved from PoP n/a all SILEC areas are served

Non-SILEC Operations

Technologies used in the access facilities for serving subscribers: Unserved - Average Upstream Speeds Offered Unserved - Average Downstream Speeds Offered Underserved - Average Upstream Speeds Offered Underserved - Average Downstream Speeds Offered wireless # #

Average Capacities (Mpbs) Average Capacities (Mpbs) Technologies used for connecting to the PoP: Unserved to PoP Unserved from PoP Underserved to PoP Underserved from PoP Fibre # #

Wireless # #
CRTC-10
Hay Communications Abridged
TSPs

With respect to your company's operating territory, provide the following information in areas that are currently unserved or underserved as of Dec 2014 SILEC Operating Territory

Total number of Pops:

Underserved - Average Capacities (Mpbs) Underserved - Total Capacity Used (Mpbs) Technologies used for backhaul for each POP To PoP From PoP Peak Non Peak n/a All SILEC areas are served

Non-SILEC Operations
Total number of Pops: 1

Underserved - Average Capacities (Mpbs) Underserved - Total Capacity Used (Mpbs) Technologies used for backhaul for each POP To PoP From PoP Peak Non Peak Fibre # # # #

CRTC-11
Hay Communications Abridged
TSPs

To better understand historical and projected network utilization and demand for broadband Internet access services, provide responses to the following:

Question Answer

1 Describe the various engineering assumptions associated with network deployments/upgrades, such as percentage of active users at peak periods & at other times of the day, as well as their peak usage demands. Provide the oversubscription ratios used. # 2 Are different engineering assumptions utilized when planning network deployments/upgrades in different geographic areas, when different technologies are used, or where different speed tiers are offered to end users? If yes, please explain these differences # 3 For each of the years 2010-2014, provide 1) the network engineering assumption for throughput bandwidth allocated to each end user expressed in kbps & 2) the average volume of data used per end user expressed in gigabytes (GB) per month. # 4 The network engineering assumption for throughput bandwidth allocated to each end user expressed in kbps for the following years The average volume of data used per end user for each of these years 2010 not calculated not calculated

2011 not calculated not calculated
2012 not calculated not calculated
2013 not calculated not calculated
2014 not calculated not calculated

5 For each of the years 2015 to 2019, provide forecasts for the information requested in above The average volume of data used per end user for each of these years 2015 none calculated none calculated

2016 none calculated none calculated
2017 none calculated none calculated
2018 none calculated none calculated
2019 none calculated none calculated

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2396359 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - Hay_Communications_RFI_Responses_14Jul2015_ABRIDGED.xls
CRTC-1
Hay Communications Abridged
Wireline & Mobile Wireless Service Providers

SILEC Territory as of December 2014 Non-SILEC Operations as of December 2014 Subscribers to lowest Priced Wireline Voice Service Subscribers to lowest Priced Postpaid Mobile Wireless Voice Plan Subscribers to lowest Priced Wireline Voice Service Subscribers to lowest Priced Postpaid Mobile Wireless Voice Plan # of customers located in HCSA # See note # See note % of customers located in HCSA # #

# of customers located in non-HCSA # #
% of customers located in non-HCSA # #
Non Discounted **** # #
Additional Monthly Charges

Description of each service offering (ex: optional services or enhanced features; number of local minutes, long distance minutes, text messages, etc) Call Waiting (3.00), Call Forwarding ($3.00), 3 way calling ($3.00), **** calling ($3.00), Call Display ($5.00), Call Answer ($2.95)

**** distance plans available: 3 cents/min #

**** available throughout Province? Y or N (if N, provide reason) No - geographic limitations No - geographic limitations Notes:

1) For information related to wireless services, please see the submission of Bell Canada. We have sublicensed our wireless spectrum to Bell Mobility and act as agents on their behalf.

CRTC-2
Hay Communications
Mobile Wireless Services Providers
Prepaid Wireless Voice Plan
Lowest priced plan as of Dec 2014 See Note

Description of each service offering (ex: per call connection, roll over minutes, other associated charges) **** per minute - local call

Description of each service offering (ex: optional services or enhanced features; number of local minutes, long distance minutes, text messages, etc) Plan offered throughout Province? Y or N (if N, provide reason) Note:

1) For information related to wireless services, please see the submission of Bell Canada. We have sublicensed our wireless spectrum to Bell Mobility and act as agents on their behalf.

CRTC-3
Hay Communications Abridged
Internet Service Providers

SILEC Territory - Subscribed to plan closest to the Commissions target speed of 5 Mbps download & 1 Mbps upload Non-SILEC Operations - Subscribed to plan closest to the Commissions target speed of 5 Mbps download & 1 Mbps upload Number of residential customers (as of Dec 2014) # # % of residential customers (as of Dec 2014) # # % of customers in HCSA # #

% of customers in non-HCSA # #
Non Discounted **** # #

Description of plan (speed, data cap, overage charge) # # **** available throughout Province? Y or N (if N, provide reason) No - geographic limitations No - geographic limitationsCRTC-4

Hay Communications

Mobile Wireless Service Providers HCSA non-HCSA Residential Customers - Mobile Wireless Service 5 most popular features Description **** Additional Costs % # % # 1 See note

2
3
4
5
Note:

1) For information related to wireless services, please see the submission of Bell Canada. We have sublicensed our wireless spectrum to Bell Mobility and act as agents on their behalf.

CRTC-5
Hay Communications Abridged
TSPs HCSA non-HCSA

Residential Customers 3 most popular wireline voice plans Description **** - Non-discounted Additional Costs % # % # 1 Residential phone service Primary exchange service 23.5 BRS (0.13) and 911 (0.24) # # 0 0 2 Residential phone service Primary exchange service-CLEC # BRS (0.13) and 911 (0.24) # # 0 0 3 we only have 2 wireline voice plans

HCSA non-HCSA

Residential Customers 3 most popular wireline Internet Plans Description **** - Non-discounted Additional Costs % # % # 1 # # # # # 0 0

2 # # # # # 0 0
3 # # # # # 0 0
CRTC-6
Hay Communications

Wireline, mobile wireless, fixed wireless and/or satellite direct to home Internet service providers Residential Customers for 2014 Monthly Average Usage (GB) Wireline Internet Service not available

Mobile Wireless Internet Service not available
CRTC-7
Hay Communications Abridged
TSPs
For the Year 2014

Service Service Offering/Initiatives - discounted for affordability (seniors, students..) % Customers using offers and initaitives # of Customers using offers and initiatives Wireline Voice Standard CRTC mandated tools # # Mobile Wireless voice none

Wireline Internet none
Mobile Wireless Internet none
Fixed Wireless Internet none
Satellite Internet none
CRTC-8
Hay Communications Abridged
TSPs

SILEC Territory - Capable of Serving SILEC -Territory Being Served SILEC Territory - Hitting Target 5Mbps/1Mbps Non-SILEC Operations - Capable of Serving Non-SILEC Operations - Being Served Non-SILEC Operations - Hitting Target 5Mbps/1Mbps (Speed actually being delivered) # of Households

# # # # # # #
CRTC-9
Hay Communications Abridged
TSPs

With respect to your company's operating territory, provide the following information for areas that are currently unserved or underserved as of Dec 2014.

SILEC Operating Territory

Technologies used in the access facilities for serving subscribers: Unserved - Average Upstream Speeds Offered Unserved - Average Downstream Speeds Offered Underserved - Average Upstream Speeds Offered Underserved - Average Downstream Speeds Offered n/a all SILEC areas are served

Average Capacities (Mpbs) Average Capacities (Mpbs) Technologies used for connecting to the PoP: Unserved to PoP Unserved from PoP Underserved to PoP Underserved from PoP n/a all SILEC areas are served

Non-SILEC Operations

Technologies used in the access facilities for serving subscribers: Unserved - Average Upstream Speeds Offered Unserved - Average Downstream Speeds Offered Underserved - Average Upstream Speeds Offered Underserved - Average Downstream Speeds Offered wireless # #

Average Capacities (Mpbs) Average Capacities (Mpbs) Technologies used for connecting to the PoP: Unserved to PoP Unserved from PoP Underserved to PoP Underserved from PoP Fibre # #

Wireless # #
CRTC-10
Hay Communications Abridged
TSPs

With respect to your company's operating territory, provide the following information in areas that are currently unserved or underserved as of Dec 2014 SILEC Operating Territory

Total number of Pops:

Underserved - Average Capacities (Mpbs) Underserved - Total Capacity Used (Mpbs) Technologies used for backhaul for each POP To PoP From PoP Peak Non Peak n/a All SILEC areas are served

Non-SILEC Operations
Total number of Pops: 1

Underserved - Average Capacities (Mpbs) Underserved - Total Capacity Used (Mpbs) Technologies used for backhaul for each POP To PoP From PoP Peak Non Peak Fibre # # # #

CRTC-11
Hay Communications Abridged
TSPs

To better understand historical and projected network utilization and demand for broadband Internet access services, provide responses to the following:

Question Answer

1 Describe the various engineering assumptions associated with network deployments/upgrades, such as percentage of active users at peak periods & at other times of the day, as well as their peak usage demands. Provide the oversubscription ratios used. # 2 Are different engineering assumptions utilized when planning network deployments/upgrades in different geographic areas, when different technologies are used, or where different speed tiers are offered to end users? If yes, please explain these differences # 3 For each of the years 2010-2014, provide 1) the network engineering assumption for throughput bandwidth allocated to each end user expressed in kbps & 2) the average volume of data used per end user expressed in gigabytes (GB) per month. # 4 The network engineering assumption for throughput bandwidth allocated to each end user expressed in kbps for the following years The average volume of data used per end user for each of these years 2010 not calculated not calculated

2011 not calculated not calculated
2012 not calculated not calculated
2013 not calculated not calculated
2014 not calculated not calculated

5 For each of the years 2015 to 2019, provide forecasts for the information requested in above The average volume of data used per end user for each of these years 2015 none calculated none calculated

2016 none calculated none calculated
2017 none calculated none calculated
2018 none calculated none calculated
2019 none calculated none calculated

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2396359 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - Hay_Communications_RFI_Responses_14Jul2015_ABRIDGED.xls
CRTC-1
Hay Communications Abridged
Wireline & Mobile Wireless Service Providers

SILEC Territory as of December 2014 Non-SILEC Operations as of December 2014 Subscribers to lowest Priced Wireline Voice Service Subscribers to lowest Priced Postpaid Mobile Wireless Voice Plan Subscribers to lowest Priced Wireline Voice Service Subscribers to lowest Priced Postpaid Mobile Wireless Voice Plan # of customers located in HCSA # See note # See note % of customers located in HCSA # #

# of customers located in non-HCSA # #
% of customers located in non-HCSA # #
Non Discounted **** # #
Additional Monthly Charges

Description of each service offering (ex: optional services or enhanced features; number of local minutes, long distance minutes, text messages, etc) Call Waiting (3.00), Call Forwarding ($3.00), 3 way calling ($3.00), **** calling ($3.00), Call Display ($5.00), Call Answer ($2.95)

**** distance plans available: 3 cents/min #

**** available throughout Province? Y or N (if N, provide reason) No - geographic limitations No - geographic limitations Notes:

1) For information related to wireless services, please see the submission of Bell Canada. We have sublicensed our wireless spectrum to Bell Mobility and act as agents on their behalf.

CRTC-2
Hay Communications
Mobile Wireless Services Providers
Prepaid Wireless Voice Plan
Lowest priced plan as of Dec 2014 See Note

Description of each service offering (ex: per call connection, roll over minutes, other associated charges) **** per minute - local call

Description of each service offering (ex: optional services or enhanced features; number of local minutes, long distance minutes, text messages, etc) Plan offered throughout Province? Y or N (if N, provide reason) Note:

1) For information related to wireless services, please see the submission of Bell Canada. We have sublicensed our wireless spectrum to Bell Mobility and act as agents on their behalf.

CRTC-3
Hay Communications Abridged
Internet Service Providers

SILEC Territory - Subscribed to plan closest to the Commissions target speed of 5 Mbps download & 1 Mbps upload Non-SILEC Operations - Subscribed to plan closest to the Commissions target speed of 5 Mbps download & 1 Mbps upload Number of residential customers (as of Dec 2014) # # % of residential customers (as of Dec 2014) # # % of customers in HCSA # #

% of customers in non-HCSA # #
Non Discounted **** # #

Description of plan (speed, data cap, overage charge) # # **** available throughout Province? Y or N (if N, provide reason) No - geographic limitations No - geographic limitationsCRTC-4

Hay Communications

Mobile Wireless Service Providers HCSA non-HCSA Residential Customers - Mobile Wireless Service 5 most popular features Description **** Additional Costs % # % # 1 See note

2
3
4
5
Note:

1) For information related to wireless services, please see the submission of Bell Canada. We have sublicensed our wireless spectrum to Bell Mobility and act as agents on their behalf.

CRTC-5
Hay Communications Abridged
TSPs HCSA non-HCSA

Residential Customers 3 most popular wireline voice plans Description **** - Non-discounted Additional Costs % # % # 1 Residential phone service Primary exchange service 23.5 BRS (0.13) and 911 (0.24) # # 0 0 2 Residential phone service Primary exchange service-CLEC # BRS (0.13) and 911 (0.24) # # 0 0 3 we only have 2 wireline voice plans

HCSA non-HCSA

Residential Customers 3 most popular wireline Internet Plans Description **** - Non-discounted Additional Costs % # % # 1 # # # # # 0 0

2 # # # # # 0 0
3 # # # # # 0 0
CRTC-6
Hay Communications

Wireline, mobile wireless, fixed wireless and/or satellite direct to home Internet service providers Residential Customers for 2014 Monthly Average Usage (GB) Wireline Internet Service not available

Mobile Wireless Internet Service not available
CRTC-7
Hay Communications Abridged
TSPs
For the Year 2014

Service Service Offering/Initiatives - discounted for affordability (seniors, students..) % Customers using offers and initaitives # of Customers using offers and initiatives Wireline Voice Standard CRTC mandated tools # # Mobile Wireless voice none

Wireline Internet none
Mobile Wireless Internet none
Fixed Wireless Internet none
Satellite Internet none
CRTC-8
Hay Communications Abridged
TSPs

SILEC Territory - Capable of Serving SILEC -Territory Being Served SILEC Territory - Hitting Target 5Mbps/1Mbps Non-SILEC Operations - Capable of Serving Non-SILEC Operations - Being Served Non-SILEC Operations - Hitting Target 5Mbps/1Mbps (Speed actually being delivered) # of Households

# # # # # # #
CRTC-9
Hay Communications Abridged
TSPs

With respect to your company's operating territory, provide the following information for areas that are currently unserved or underserved as of Dec 2014.

SILEC Operating Territory

Technologies used in the access facilities for serving subscribers: Unserved - Average Upstream Speeds Offered Unserved - Average Downstream Speeds Offered Underserved - Average Upstream Speeds Offered Underserved - Average Downstream Speeds Offered n/a all SILEC areas are served

Average Capacities (Mpbs) Average Capacities (Mpbs) Technologies used for connecting to the PoP: Unserved to PoP Unserved from PoP Underserved to PoP Underserved from PoP n/a all SILEC areas are served

Non-SILEC Operations

Technologies used in the access facilities for serving subscribers: Unserved - Average Upstream Speeds Offered Unserved - Average Downstream Speeds Offered Underserved - Average Upstream Speeds Offered Underserved - Average Downstream Speeds Offered wireless # #

Average Capacities (Mpbs) Average Capacities (Mpbs) Technologies used for connecting to the PoP: Unserved to PoP Unserved from PoP Underserved to PoP Underserved from PoP Fibre # #

Wireless # #
CRTC-10
Hay Communications Abridged
TSPs

With respect to your company's operating territory, provide the following information in areas that are currently unserved or underserved as of Dec 2014 SILEC Operating Territory

Total number of Pops:

Underserved - Average Capacities (Mpbs) Underserved - Total Capacity Used (Mpbs) Technologies used for backhaul for each POP To PoP From PoP Peak Non Peak n/a All SILEC areas are served

Non-SILEC Operations
Total number of Pops: 1

Underserved - Average Capacities (Mpbs) Underserved - Total Capacity Used (Mpbs) Technologies used for backhaul for each POP To PoP From PoP Peak Non Peak Fibre # # # #

CRTC-11
Hay Communications Abridged
TSPs

To better understand historical and projected network utilization and demand for broadband Internet access services, provide responses to the following:

Question Answer

1 Describe the various engineering assumptions associated with network deployments/upgrades, such as percentage of active users at peak periods & at other times of the day, as well as their peak usage demands. Provide the oversubscription ratios used. # 2 Are different engineering assumptions utilized when planning network deployments/upgrades in different geographic areas, when different technologies are used, or where different speed tiers are offered to end users? If yes, please explain these differences # 3 For each of the years 2010-2014, provide 1) the network engineering assumption for throughput bandwidth allocated to each end user expressed in kbps & 2) the average volume of data used per end user expressed in gigabytes (GB) per month. # 4 The network engineering assumption for throughput bandwidth allocated to each end user expressed in kbps for the following years The average volume of data used per end user for each of these years 2010 not calculated not calculated

2011 not calculated not calculated
2012 not calculated not calculated
2013 not calculated not calculated
2014 not calculated not calculated

5 For each of the years 2015 to 2019, provide forecasts for the information requested in above The average volume of data used per end user for each of these years 2015 none calculated none calculated

2016 none calculated none calculated
2017 none calculated none calculated
2018 none calculated none calculated
2019 none calculated none calculated

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2396359 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - Hay_Communications_RFI_Responses_14Jul2015_ABRIDGED.xls
CRTC-1
Hay Communications Abridged
Wireline & Mobile Wireless Service Providers

SILEC Territory as of December 2014 Non-SILEC Operations as of December 2014 Subscribers to lowest Priced Wireline Voice Service Subscribers to lowest Priced Postpaid Mobile Wireless Voice Plan Subscribers to lowest Priced Wireline Voice Service Subscribers to lowest Priced Postpaid Mobile Wireless Voice Plan # of customers located in HCSA # See note # See note % of customers located in HCSA # #

# of customers located in non-HCSA # #
% of customers located in non-HCSA # #
Non Discounted **** # #
Additional Monthly Charges

Description of each service offering (ex: optional services or enhanced features; number of local minutes, long distance minutes, text messages, etc) Call Waiting (3.00), Call Forwarding ($3.00), 3 way calling ($3.00), **** calling ($3.00), Call Display ($5.00), Call Answer ($2.95)

**** distance plans available: 3 cents/min #

**** available throughout Province? Y or N (if N, provide reason) No - geographic limitations No - geographic limitations Notes:

1) For information related to wireless services, please see the submission of Bell Canada. We have sublicensed our wireless spectrum to Bell Mobility and act as agents on their behalf.

CRTC-2
Hay Communications
Mobile Wireless Services Providers
Prepaid Wireless Voice Plan
Lowest priced plan as of Dec 2014 See Note

Description of each service offering (ex: per call connection, roll over minutes, other associated charges) **** per minute - local call

Description of each service offering (ex: optional services or enhanced features; number of local minutes, long distance minutes, text messages, etc) Plan offered throughout Province? Y or N (if N, provide reason) Note:

1) For information related to wireless services, please see the submission of Bell Canada. We have sublicensed our wireless spectrum to Bell Mobility and act as agents on their behalf.

CRTC-3
Hay Communications Abridged
Internet Service Providers

SILEC Territory - Subscribed to plan closest to the Commissions target speed of 5 Mbps download & 1 Mbps upload Non-SILEC Operations - Subscribed to plan closest to the Commissions target speed of 5 Mbps download & 1 Mbps upload Number of residential customers (as of Dec 2014) # # % of residential customers (as of Dec 2014) # # % of customers in HCSA # #

% of customers in non-HCSA # #
Non Discounted **** # #

Description of plan (speed, data cap, overage charge) # # **** available throughout Province? Y or N (if N, provide reason) No - geographic limitations No - geographic limitationsCRTC-4

Hay Communications

Mobile Wireless Service Providers HCSA non-HCSA Residential Customers - Mobile Wireless Service 5 most popular features Description **** Additional Costs % # % # 1 See note

2
3
4
5
Note:

1) For information related to wireless services, please see the submission of Bell Canada. We have sublicensed our wireless spectrum to Bell Mobility and act as agents on their behalf.

CRTC-5
Hay Communications Abridged
TSPs HCSA non-HCSA

Residential Customers 3 most popular wireline voice plans Description **** - Non-discounted Additional Costs % # % # 1 Residential phone service Primary exchange service 23.5 BRS (0.13) and 911 (0.24) # # 0 0 2 Residential phone service Primary exchange service-CLEC # BRS (0.13) and 911 (0.24) # # 0 0 3 we only have 2 wireline voice plans

HCSA non-HCSA

Residential Customers 3 most popular wireline Internet Plans Description **** - Non-discounted Additional Costs % # % # 1 # # # # # 0 0

2 # # # # # 0 0
3 # # # # # 0 0
CRTC-6
Hay Communications

Wireline, mobile wireless, fixed wireless and/or satellite direct to home Internet service providers Residential Customers for 2014 Monthly Average Usage (GB) Wireline Internet Service not available

Mobile Wireless Internet Service not available
CRTC-7
Hay Communications Abridged
TSPs
For the Year 2014

Service Service Offering/Initiatives - discounted for affordability (seniors, students..) % Customers using offers and initaitives # of Customers using offers and initiatives Wireline Voice Standard CRTC mandated tools # # Mobile Wireless voice none

Wireline Internet none
Mobile Wireless Internet none
Fixed Wireless Internet none
Satellite Internet none
CRTC-8
Hay Communications Abridged
TSPs

SILEC Territory - Capable of Serving SILEC -Territory Being Served SILEC Territory - Hitting Target 5Mbps/1Mbps Non-SILEC Operations - Capable of Serving Non-SILEC Operations - Being Served Non-SILEC Operations - Hitting Target 5Mbps/1Mbps (Speed actually being delivered) # of Households

# # # # # # #
CRTC-9
Hay Communications Abridged
TSPs

With respect to your company's operating territory, provide the following information for areas that are currently unserved or underserved as of Dec 2014.

SILEC Operating Territory

Technologies used in the access facilities for serving subscribers: Unserved - Average Upstream Speeds Offered Unserved - Average Downstream Speeds Offered Underserved - Average Upstream Speeds Offered Underserved - Average Downstream Speeds Offered n/a all SILEC areas are served

Average Capacities (Mpbs) Average Capacities (Mpbs) Technologies used for connecting to the PoP: Unserved to PoP Unserved from PoP Underserved to PoP Underserved from PoP n/a all SILEC areas are served

Non-SILEC Operations

Technologies used in the access facilities for serving subscribers: Unserved - Average Upstream Speeds Offered Unserved - Average Downstream Speeds Offered Underserved - Average Upstream Speeds Offered Underserved - Average Downstream Speeds Offered wireless # #

Average Capacities (Mpbs) Average Capacities (Mpbs) Technologies used for connecting to the PoP: Unserved to PoP Unserved from PoP Underserved to PoP Underserved from PoP Fibre # #

Wireless # #
CRTC-10
Hay Communications Abridged
TSPs

With respect to your company's operating territory, provide the following information in areas that are currently unserved or underserved as of Dec 2014 SILEC Operating Territory

Total number of Pops:

Underserved - Average Capacities (Mpbs) Underserved - Total Capacity Used (Mpbs) Technologies used for backhaul for each POP To PoP From PoP Peak Non Peak n/a All SILEC areas are served

Non-SILEC Operations
Total number of Pops: 1

Underserved - Average Capacities (Mpbs) Underserved - Total Capacity Used (Mpbs) Technologies used for backhaul for each POP To PoP From PoP Peak Non Peak Fibre # # # #

CRTC-11
Hay Communications Abridged
TSPs

To better understand historical and projected network utilization and demand for broadband Internet access services, provide responses to the following:

Question Answer

1 Describe the various engineering assumptions associated with network deployments/upgrades, such as percentage of active users at peak periods & at other times of the day, as well as their peak usage demands. Provide the oversubscription ratios used. # 2 Are different engineering assumptions utilized when planning network deployments/upgrades in different geographic areas, when different technologies are used, or where different speed tiers are offered to end users? If yes, please explain these differences # 3 For each of the years 2010-2014, provide 1) the network engineering assumption for throughput bandwidth allocated to each end user expressed in kbps & 2) the average volume of data used per end user expressed in gigabytes (GB) per month. # 4 The network engineering assumption for throughput bandwidth allocated to each end user expressed in kbps for the following years The average volume of data used per end user for each of these years 2010 not calculated not calculated

2011 not calculated not calculated
2012 not calculated not calculated
2013 not calculated not calculated
2014 not calculated not calculated

5 For each of the years 2015 to 2019, provide forecasts for the information requested in above The average volume of data used per end user for each of these years 2015 none calculated none calculated

2016 none calculated none calculated
2017 none calculated none calculated
2018 none calculated none calculated
2019 none calculated none calculated

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2344118 - 2015-134 - Réponses aux demandes de renseignements - MRC de Minganie.doc
Demande de renseignements

1. En ce qui concerne les réseaux ou les installations de télécommunication construits ou détenus par votre organisation, ou les services de télécommunication qu’elle offre, veuillez fournir les renseignements suivants :

a. le type de réseau qui a été construit (p. ex., fixe, mobile) ainsi que la capacité offerte aux divers endroits (p. ex., les écoles, les points d’accès sans fil, chez les utilisateurs finals) et la technologie utilisée (p. ex., fibre, câble, ligne d’abonné numérique, mobile, satellite, Wi-Fi);

- le réseau est filaire en fibre optique selon la technologie FTTH

- les abonnés, résidentiels ou commerciaux, choisissent un forfait de 5 MB à 50 MB avec capacité de téléchargement de 20 Gig à 100 Gigb. les vitesses du service à large bande offertes aux abonnés, et la méthode que vous utilisez pour établir que ces vitesses répondraient aux besoins des abonnés;

- les vitesses sont de 5 MB à 50 MB et les abonnés désiraient avoir la même offre que dans les autres régionsc. le montant de l’investissement ainsi que le ou les modes de financement utilisés;

- le coût a été de 2 M $, financé aux deux tiers par le Programme communautés rurales branchées du Gouvernement du Québec et un tiers par les municipalités participantesd. les détails relatifs à tout partenariat établi avec d’autres organisations pour déployer le réseau;

- sans objet
e. les raisons motivant votre décision de déployer un réseau à large bande;
- devenu un service essentiel au XXl ème siècle

f. l’approche que vous préconisez quant à l’utilisation du réseau par les fournisseurs de services (le cas échéant), y compris :

i. la ou les compagnies offrant le service de détail;
- faire affaire avec des distributeurs locaux et régionaux

ii. une description de la méthode employée pour choisir le fournisseur de services de télécommunications (s’il y a un seul fournisseur de service).

- inclut dans l’appel d’offres pour la construction du réseau

2. Si des services de détail sont disponibles sur votre réseau, veuillez fournir les renseignements suivants :

a. les types de services de télécommunication disponibles (p. ex., téléphonie filaire, téléphonie sans fil mobile, Internet filaire et Internet sans fil mobile) et le prix pour chaque offre de service, et fournissez une description des caractéristiques du service incluses dans chaque offre de service (p. ex., la vitesse, les limites d’utilisation de données, les minutes d’appel);

- les abonnés, résidentiels ou commerciaux, choisissent un forfait de 5 MB à 50 MB avec capacité de téléchargement de 20 Gig à 100 Gig- les forfaits varient de 50 $ à 100 $ par mois

- la téléphonie IP est offerte pour 50 $ / mois avec messagerie et interurbain illimité au Canada
b. les trois offres de détail les plus populaires pour chaque type de services indiqués en a) ci-dessus;
- internet haute vitesse de base, vitesse accélérée et téléphonie

c. dans le cas de chaque catégorie de services de télécommunication que vous fournissez (p. ex., téléphonie filaire, téléphonie sans fil mobile, Internet filaire et Internet sans fil mobile), une description des offres de service (p.ex., forfaits à prix réduit, prix spéciaux) ou des mesures (p. ex., outils de gestion de la facture, blocage de l’accès à l’interurbain) disponibles pour aider certains segments de la population pour qui l’accès ou le caractère abordable de cet accès peut constituer une source de préoccupation (p. ex., les personnes âgées, les Canadiens à faible revenu, les personnes handicapées, les étudiants).

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Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2344118 - 2015-134 - Réponses aux demandes de renseignements - MRC de Minganie.doc
Demande de renseignements

1. En ce qui concerne les réseaux ou les installations de télécommunication construits ou détenus par votre organisation, ou les services de télécommunication qu’elle offre, veuillez fournir les renseignements suivants :

a. le type de réseau qui a été construit (p. ex., fixe, mobile) ainsi que la capacité offerte aux divers endroits (p. ex., les écoles, les points d’accès sans fil, chez les utilisateurs finals) et la technologie utilisée (p. ex., fibre, câble, ligne d’abonné numérique, mobile, satellite, Wi-Fi);

- le réseau est filaire en fibre optique selon la technologie FTTH

- les abonnés, résidentiels ou commerciaux, choisissent un forfait de 5 MB à 50 MB avec capacité de téléchargement de 20 Gig à 100 Gigb. les vitesses du service à large bande offertes aux abonnés, et la méthode que vous utilisez pour établir que ces vitesses répondraient aux besoins des abonnés;

- les vitesses sont de 5 MB à 50 MB et les abonnés désiraient avoir la même offre que dans les autres régionsc. le montant de l’investissement ainsi que le ou les modes de financement utilisés;

- le coût a été de 2 M $, financé aux deux tiers par le Programme communautés rurales branchées du Gouvernement du Québec et un tiers par les municipalités participantesd. les détails relatifs à tout partenariat établi avec d’autres organisations pour déployer le réseau;

- sans objet
e. les raisons motivant votre décision de déployer un réseau à large bande;
- devenu un service essentiel au XXl ème siècle

f. l’approche que vous préconisez quant à l’utilisation du réseau par les fournisseurs de services (le cas échéant), y compris :

i. la ou les compagnies offrant le service de détail;
- faire affaire avec des distributeurs locaux et régionaux

ii. une description de la méthode employée pour choisir le fournisseur de services de télécommunications (s’il y a un seul fournisseur de service).

- inclut dans l’appel d’offres pour la construction du réseau

2. Si des services de détail sont disponibles sur votre réseau, veuillez fournir les renseignements suivants :

a. les types de services de télécommunication disponibles (p. ex., téléphonie filaire, téléphonie sans fil mobile, Internet filaire et Internet sans fil mobile) et le prix pour chaque offre de service, et fournissez une description des caractéristiques du service incluses dans chaque offre de service (p. ex., la vitesse, les limites d’utilisation de données, les minutes d’appel);

- les abonnés, résidentiels ou commerciaux, choisissent un forfait de 5 MB à 50 MB avec capacité de téléchargement de 20 Gig à 100 Gig- les forfaits varient de 50 $ à 100 $ par mois

- la téléphonie IP est offerte pour 50 $ / mois avec messagerie et interurbain illimité au Canada
b. les trois offres de détail les plus populaires pour chaque type de services indiqués en a) ci-dessus;
- internet haute vitesse de base, vitesse accélérée et téléphonie

c. dans le cas de chaque catégorie de services de télécommunication que vous fournissez (p. ex., téléphonie filaire, téléphonie sans fil mobile, Internet filaire et Internet sans fil mobile), une description des offres de service (p.ex., forfaits à prix réduit, prix spéciaux) ou des mesures (p. ex., outils de gestion de la facture, blocage de l’accès à l’interurbain) disponibles pour aider certains segments de la population pour qui l’accès ou le caractère abordable de cet accès peut constituer une source de préoccupation (p. ex., les personnes âgées, les Canadiens à faible revenu, les personnes handicapées, les étudiants).

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Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2344118 - 2015-134 - Réponses aux demandes de renseignements - MRC de Minganie.doc
Demande de renseignements

1. En ce qui concerne les réseaux ou les installations de télécommunication construits ou détenus par votre organisation, ou les services de télécommunication qu’elle offre, veuillez fournir les renseignements suivants :

a. le type de réseau qui a été construit (p. ex., fixe, mobile) ainsi que la capacité offerte aux divers endroits (p. ex., les écoles, les points d’accès sans fil, chez les utilisateurs finals) et la technologie utilisée (p. ex., fibre, câble, ligne d’abonné numérique, mobile, satellite, Wi-Fi);

- le réseau est filaire en fibre optique selon la technologie FTTH

- les abonnés, résidentiels ou commerciaux, choisissent un forfait de 5 MB à 50 MB avec capacité de téléchargement de 20 Gig à 100 Gigb. les vitesses du service à large bande offertes aux abonnés, et la méthode que vous utilisez pour établir que ces vitesses répondraient aux besoins des abonnés;

- les vitesses sont de 5 MB à 50 MB et les abonnés désiraient avoir la même offre que dans les autres régionsc. le montant de l’investissement ainsi que le ou les modes de financement utilisés;

- le coût a été de 2 M $, financé aux deux tiers par le Programme communautés rurales branchées du Gouvernement du Québec et un tiers par les municipalités participantesd. les détails relatifs à tout partenariat établi avec d’autres organisations pour déployer le réseau;

- sans objet
e. les raisons motivant votre décision de déployer un réseau à large bande;
- devenu un service essentiel au XXl ème siècle

f. l’approche que vous préconisez quant à l’utilisation du réseau par les fournisseurs de services (le cas échéant), y compris :

i. la ou les compagnies offrant le service de détail;
- faire affaire avec des distributeurs locaux et régionaux

ii. une description de la méthode employée pour choisir le fournisseur de services de télécommunications (s’il y a un seul fournisseur de service).

- inclut dans l’appel d’offres pour la construction du réseau

2. Si des services de détail sont disponibles sur votre réseau, veuillez fournir les renseignements suivants :

a. les types de services de télécommunication disponibles (p. ex., téléphonie filaire, téléphonie sans fil mobile, Internet filaire et Internet sans fil mobile) et le prix pour chaque offre de service, et fournissez une description des caractéristiques du service incluses dans chaque offre de service (p. ex., la vitesse, les limites d’utilisation de données, les minutes d’appel);

- les abonnés, résidentiels ou commerciaux, choisissent un forfait de 5 MB à 50 MB avec capacité de téléchargement de 20 Gig à 100 Gig- les forfaits varient de 50 $ à 100 $ par mois

- la téléphonie IP est offerte pour 50 $ / mois avec messagerie et interurbain illimité au Canada
b. les trois offres de détail les plus populaires pour chaque type de services indiqués en a) ci-dessus;
- internet haute vitesse de base, vitesse accélérée et téléphonie

c. dans le cas de chaque catégorie de services de télécommunication que vous fournissez (p. ex., téléphonie filaire, téléphonie sans fil mobile, Internet filaire et Internet sans fil mobile), une description des offres de service (p.ex., forfaits à prix réduit, prix spéciaux) ou des mesures (p. ex., outils de gestion de la facture, blocage de l’accès à l’interurbain) disponibles pour aider certains segments de la population pour qui l’accès ou le caractère abordable de cet accès peut constituer une source de préoccupation (p. ex., les personnes âgées, les Canadiens à faible revenu, les personnes handicapées, les étudiants).

· [bookmark: _GoBack]Sans onbjet

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2344118 - 2015-134 - Réponses aux demandes de renseignements - MRC de Minganie.doc
Demande de renseignements

1. En ce qui concerne les réseaux ou les installations de télécommunication construits ou détenus par votre organisation, ou les services de télécommunication qu’elle offre, veuillez fournir les renseignements suivants :

a. le type de réseau qui a été construit (p. ex., fixe, mobile) ainsi que la capacité offerte aux divers endroits (p. ex., les écoles, les points d’accès sans fil, chez les utilisateurs finals) et la technologie utilisée (p. ex., fibre, câble, ligne d’abonné numérique, mobile, satellite, Wi-Fi);

- le réseau est filaire en fibre optique selon la technologie FTTH

- les abonnés, résidentiels ou commerciaux, choisissent un forfait de 5 MB à 50 MB avec capacité de téléchargement de 20 Gig à 100 Gigb. les vitesses du service à large bande offertes aux abonnés, et la méthode que vous utilisez pour établir que ces vitesses répondraient aux besoins des abonnés;

- les vitesses sont de 5 MB à 50 MB et les abonnés désiraient avoir la même offre que dans les autres régionsc. le montant de l’investissement ainsi que le ou les modes de financement utilisés;

- le coût a été de 2 M $, financé aux deux tiers par le Programme communautés rurales branchées du Gouvernement du Québec et un tiers par les municipalités participantesd. les détails relatifs à tout partenariat établi avec d’autres organisations pour déployer le réseau;

- sans objet
e. les raisons motivant votre décision de déployer un réseau à large bande;
- devenu un service essentiel au XXl ème siècle

f. l’approche que vous préconisez quant à l’utilisation du réseau par les fournisseurs de services (le cas échéant), y compris :

i. la ou les compagnies offrant le service de détail;
- faire affaire avec des distributeurs locaux et régionaux

ii. une description de la méthode employée pour choisir le fournisseur de services de télécommunications (s’il y a un seul fournisseur de service).

- inclut dans l’appel d’offres pour la construction du réseau

2. Si des services de détail sont disponibles sur votre réseau, veuillez fournir les renseignements suivants :

a. les types de services de télécommunication disponibles (p. ex., téléphonie filaire, téléphonie sans fil mobile, Internet filaire et Internet sans fil mobile) et le prix pour chaque offre de service, et fournissez une description des caractéristiques du service incluses dans chaque offre de service (p. ex., la vitesse, les limites d’utilisation de données, les minutes d’appel);

- les abonnés, résidentiels ou commerciaux, choisissent un forfait de 5 MB à 50 MB avec capacité de téléchargement de 20 Gig à 100 Gig- les forfaits varient de 50 $ à 100 $ par mois

- la téléphonie IP est offerte pour 50 $ / mois avec messagerie et interurbain illimité au Canada
b. les trois offres de détail les plus populaires pour chaque type de services indiqués en a) ci-dessus;
- internet haute vitesse de base, vitesse accélérée et téléphonie

c. dans le cas de chaque catégorie de services de télécommunication que vous fournissez (p. ex., téléphonie filaire, téléphonie sans fil mobile, Internet filaire et Internet sans fil mobile), une description des offres de service (p.ex., forfaits à prix réduit, prix spéciaux) ou des mesures (p. ex., outils de gestion de la facture, blocage de l’accès à l’interurbain) disponibles pour aider certains segments de la population pour qui l’accès ou le caractère abordable de cet accès peut constituer une source de préoccupation (p. ex., les personnes âgées, les Canadiens à faible revenu, les personnes handicapées, les étudiants).

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Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2395428 - 2015-134 - Responses to request for information - DCL response to CRTC 07May15_11ABRIDGED.pdf

DISTRIBUTEL COMMUNICATIONS LIMITED Response to Interrogatory ABRIDGED

14 July 2015 DISTRIBUTEL (CRTC) 07May15-11 TNC 2015-134 **** 1 of 2

**** 1 of 2
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY
CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND
TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION

Q. To better understand historical and projected network utilization and demand for broadband Internet access services, provide responses to the following questions.

1. Describe the various engineering assumptions associated with network deployments/upgrades, such as percentage of active users (i.e. households) at peak periods and at other times of day, as well as their peak usage demands.

Provide the oversubscription ratios used.

2. Are different engineering assumptions utilized when planning network deployments/upgrades in different geographic areas, when different technologies are used, or where different speed tiers are offered to end users? If yes, please explain these differences.

3. For each of the years 2010 to 2014, provide 1) the network engineering assumption for throughput bandwidth allocated to each end user expressed in kilobits per second (kbps) (i.e. engineered throughput), and 2) the average volume of data used per end user expressed in gigabytes (GB) per month.

4. For each of the years 2015 to 2019, provide the forecasts for the information requested in part c) above.

A. Distributel’s response to this interrogatory is filed in confidence with the Commission pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act. Release of this information, which is consistently treated in a confidential manner by Distributel, would cause specific direct harm to Distributel by providing existing and potential competitors with invaluable competitively-sensitive information, thereby enabling them to develop business strategies to more effectively compete with Distributel. An abridged version is provided for the public record.

1) #

DISTRIBUTEL COMMUNICATIONS LIMITED Response to Interrogatory ABRIDGED

14 July 2015 DISTRIBUTEL (CRTC) 07May15-11 TNC 2015-134 **** 2 of 2

2) #
3) #
4) #
***END OF DOCUMENT***

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2395428 - 2015-134 - Responses to request for information - DCL response to CRTC 07May15_11ABRIDGED.pdf

DISTRIBUTEL COMMUNICATIONS LIMITED Response to Interrogatory ABRIDGED

14 July 2015 DISTRIBUTEL (CRTC) 07May15-11 TNC 2015-134 **** 1 of 2

**** 1 of 2
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY
CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND
TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION

Q. To better understand historical and projected network utilization and demand for broadband Internet access services, provide responses to the following questions.

1. Describe the various engineering assumptions associated with network deployments/upgrades, such as percentage of active users (i.e. households) at peak periods and at other times of day, as well as their peak usage demands.

Provide the oversubscription ratios used.

2. Are different engineering assumptions utilized when planning network deployments/upgrades in different geographic areas, when different technologies are used, or where different speed tiers are offered to end users? If yes, please explain these differences.

3. For each of the years 2010 to 2014, provide 1) the network engineering assumption for throughput bandwidth allocated to each end user expressed in kilobits per second (kbps) (i.e. engineered throughput), and 2) the average volume of data used per end user expressed in gigabytes (GB) per month.

4. For each of the years 2015 to 2019, provide the forecasts for the information requested in part c) above.

A. Distributel’s response to this interrogatory is filed in confidence with the Commission pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act. Release of this information, which is consistently treated in a confidential manner by Distributel, would cause specific direct harm to Distributel by providing existing and potential competitors with invaluable competitively-sensitive information, thereby enabling them to develop business strategies to more effectively compete with Distributel. An abridged version is provided for the public record.

1) #

DISTRIBUTEL COMMUNICATIONS LIMITED Response to Interrogatory ABRIDGED

14 July 2015 DISTRIBUTEL (CRTC) 07May15-11 TNC 2015-134 **** 2 of 2

2) #
3) #
4) #
***END OF DOCUMENT***

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2395428 - 2015-134 - Responses to request for information - DCL response to CRTC 07May15_11ABRIDGED.pdf

DISTRIBUTEL COMMUNICATIONS LIMITED Response to Interrogatory ABRIDGED

14 July 2015 DISTRIBUTEL (CRTC) 07May15-11 TNC 2015-134 **** 1 of 2

**** 1 of 2
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY
CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND
TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION

Q. To better understand historical and projected network utilization and demand for broadband Internet access services, provide responses to the following questions.

1. Describe the various engineering assumptions associated with network deployments/upgrades, such as percentage of active users (i.e. households) at peak periods and at other times of day, as well as their peak usage demands.

Provide the oversubscription ratios used.

2. Are different engineering assumptions utilized when planning network deployments/upgrades in different geographic areas, when different technologies are used, or where different speed tiers are offered to end users? If yes, please explain these differences.

3. For each of the years 2010 to 2014, provide 1) the network engineering assumption for throughput bandwidth allocated to each end user expressed in kilobits per second (kbps) (i.e. engineered throughput), and 2) the average volume of data used per end user expressed in gigabytes (GB) per month.

4. For each of the years 2015 to 2019, provide the forecasts for the information requested in part c) above.

A. Distributel’s response to this interrogatory is filed in confidence with the Commission pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act. Release of this information, which is consistently treated in a confidential manner by Distributel, would cause specific direct harm to Distributel by providing existing and potential competitors with invaluable competitively-sensitive information, thereby enabling them to develop business strategies to more effectively compete with Distributel. An abridged version is provided for the public record.

1) #

DISTRIBUTEL COMMUNICATIONS LIMITED Response to Interrogatory ABRIDGED

14 July 2015 DISTRIBUTEL (CRTC) 07May15-11 TNC 2015-134 **** 2 of 2

2) #
3) #
4) #
***END OF DOCUMENT***

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2395428 - 2015-134 - Responses to request for information - DCL response to CRTC 07May15_11ABRIDGED.pdf

DISTRIBUTEL COMMUNICATIONS LIMITED Response to Interrogatory ABRIDGED

14 July 2015 DISTRIBUTEL (CRTC) 07May15-11 TNC 2015-134 **** 1 of 2

**** 1 of 2
INFORMATION REQUESTED BY
CANADIAN RADIO-TELEVISION AND
TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION

Q. To better understand historical and projected network utilization and demand for broadband Internet access services, provide responses to the following questions.

1. Describe the various engineering assumptions associated with network deployments/upgrades, such as percentage of active users (i.e. households) at peak periods and at other times of day, as well as their peak usage demands.

Provide the oversubscription ratios used.

2. Are different engineering assumptions utilized when planning network deployments/upgrades in different geographic areas, when different technologies are used, or where different speed tiers are offered to end users? If yes, please explain these differences.

3. For each of the years 2010 to 2014, provide 1) the network engineering assumption for throughput bandwidth allocated to each end user expressed in kilobits per second (kbps) (i.e. engineered throughput), and 2) the average volume of data used per end user expressed in gigabytes (GB) per month.

4. For each of the years 2015 to 2019, provide the forecasts for the information requested in part c) above.

A. Distributel’s response to this interrogatory is filed in confidence with the Commission pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act. Release of this information, which is consistently treated in a confidential manner by Distributel, would cause specific direct harm to Distributel by providing existing and potential competitors with invaluable competitively-sensitive information, thereby enabling them to develop business strategies to more effectively compete with Distributel. An abridged version is provided for the public record.

1) #

DISTRIBUTEL COMMUNICATIONS LIMITED Response to Interrogatory ABRIDGED

14 July 2015 DISTRIBUTEL (CRTC) 07May15-11 TNC 2015-134 **** 2 of 2

2) #
3) #
4) #
***END OF DOCUMENT***

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2396743 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - TekSavvy_CRTC_7May15-09 ABRIDGED.doc
CONFIDENTIAL
TekSavvy Solutions Inc.
Response to Request
2 May 2014
TekSavvy(CRTC)28Mar14-17
TNC 2013-551
**** 1 of 1
ABRIDGED
TekSavvy Solutions Inc.
Response to Request
14 July 2015
TekSavvy(CRTC)7May15-09
TNC 2015-134
**** 1 of 2
**** 1 of 2
Q9
[TSPs]

With respect to your company’s operating territory, provide the following information for areas that are currently unserved or underserved as of December 2014:

a.

the technologies used in the access facilities for serving subscribers (or households), such as fixed wireless access (licensed or unlicensed), satellite (direct to home), cable modem, digital subscriber line (DSL), fibre-optics and mobile wireless;

b.

for each technology in (a) above, the average upstream and downstream Internet speeds that you offer;

c.

the technologies used for connecting to the PoP and average capacities in Mbps to / from the PoP; andd.

a map showing your operating territory with the types and locations of access facilities in MapInfo or compatible format.

A.
a.

TekSavvy provides wireline Internet services over third parties’ cable modem and DSL access facilities; and over TekSavvy’s fixed-wireless access facilities We do not have access to detailed knowledge as to wholesale network access providers’ geographic operating territories, including coverage of unserved or underserved territories.

With respect to fixed wireless, households within five kilometres of TekSavvy’s towers reliably achieve speeds that exceed the Commission’s speed objective. Those within five to eight kilometres of TekSavvy towers are underserved by TekSavvy, as they cannot reliably achieve these speeds. Those more than eight kilometres from these towers are unserved by TekSavvy, as they cannot achieve these speeds.

b..

TekSavvy offers plans rated to achieve up to the following speeds:

· 1 Mbps down, 256 Kbps up;
· 3 Mbps down, 512 Kbps up;
· 6 Mbps down, 1 Mbps up; and
· 10 Mbps down, 1 Mbps up.
c.

TekSavvy connects to # POPs using #. The average capacity #.

d.

A map showing TekSavvy’s operating area with the types and locations of access facilities and POPs, responsive to TekSavvy(CRTC)7May15-09d and -10d, is attached in KMZ format.

Confidential information:

The attached map and the grey-highlighted information in the confidential version of this Request for Information (“RFI”) response (“Confidential Information”), which has been redacted from its abridged version, discloses specific details regarding the configuration of TekSavvy’s network architecture which are not known to third parties.

This technical information is not known to the public, is treated consistently in a confidential manner, and would, if disclosed, prejudice TekSavvy’s competitive position in ways that would result in specific, direct harm to TekSavvy, by giving its competitors and suppliers direct insight into TekSavvy’s technical decisions and approach.

For these reasons, the Confidential Information is designated as confidential pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act; in the manner indicated by section 32 of the CRTC Rules of Practice and Procedure; and following the guidelines set out in Procedures for filing confidential information and requesting its disclosure in Commission proceedings, Broadcasting and Telecom Information Bulletin CRTC 2010-961, 3 December 2010.

***End of Document***

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Digicom Technologie Inc (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2396743 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - TekSavvy_CRTC_7May15-09 ABRIDGED.doc
CONFIDENTIAL
TekSavvy Solutions Inc.
Response to Request
2 May 2014
TekSavvy(CRTC)28Mar14-17
TNC 2013-551
**** 1 of 1
ABRIDGED
TekSavvy Solutions Inc.
Response to Request
14 July 2015
TekSavvy(CRTC)7May15-09
TNC 2015-134
**** 1 of 2
**** 1 of 2
Q9
[TSPs]

With respect to your company’s operating territory, provide the following information for areas that are currently unserved or underserved as of December 2014:

a.

the technologies used in the access facilities for serving subscribers (or households), such as fixed wireless access (licensed or unlicensed), satellite (direct to home), cable modem, digital subscriber line (DSL), fibre-optics and mobile wireless;

b.

for each technology in (a) above, the average upstream and downstream Internet speeds that you offer;

c.

the technologies used for connecting to the PoP and average capacities in Mbps to / from the PoP; andd.

a map showing your operating territory with the types and locations of access facilities in MapInfo or compatible format.

A.
a.

TekSavvy provides wireline Internet services over third parties’ cable modem and DSL access facilities; and over TekSavvy’s fixed-wireless access facilities We do not have access to detailed knowledge as to wholesale network access providers’ geographic operating territories, including coverage of unserved or underserved territories.

With respect to fixed wireless, households within five kilometres of TekSavvy’s towers reliably achieve speeds that exceed the Commission’s speed objective. Those within five to eight kilometres of TekSavvy towers are underserved by TekSavvy, as they cannot reliably achieve these speeds. Those more than eight kilometres from these towers are unserved by TekSavvy, as they cannot achieve these speeds.

b..

TekSavvy offers plans rated to achieve up to the following speeds:

· 1 Mbps down, 256 Kbps up;
· 3 Mbps down, 512 Kbps up;
· 6 Mbps down, 1 Mbps up; and
· 10 Mbps down, 1 Mbps up.
c.

TekSavvy connects to # POPs using #. The average capacity #.

d.

A map showing TekSavvy’s operating area with the types and locations of access facilities and POPs, responsive to TekSavvy(CRTC)7May15-09d and -10d, is attached in KMZ format.

Confidential information:

The attached map and the grey-highlighted information in the confidential version of this Request for Information (“RFI”) response (“Confidential Information”), which has been redacted from its abridged version, discloses specific details regarding the configuration of TekSavvy’s network architecture which are not known to third parties.

This technical information is not known to the public, is treated consistently in a confidential manner, and would, if disclosed, prejudice TekSavvy’s competitive position in ways that would result in specific, direct harm to TekSavvy, by giving its competitors and suppliers direct insight into TekSavvy’s technical decisions and approach.

For these reasons, the Confidential Information is designated as confidential pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act; in the manner indicated by section 32 of the CRTC Rules of Practice and Procedure; and following the guidelines set out in Procedures for filing confidential information and requesting its disclosure in Commission proceedings, Broadcasting and Telecom Information Bulletin CRTC 2010-961, 3 December 2010.

***End of Document***

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 835)

Document Name: DM#2396743 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - TekSavvy_CRTC_7May15-09 ABRIDGED.doc
CONFIDENTIAL
TekSavvy Solutions Inc.
Response to Request
2 May 2014
TekSavvy(CRTC)28Mar14-17
TNC 2013-551
**** 1 of 1
ABRIDGED
TekSavvy Solutions Inc.
Response to Request
14 July 2015
TekSavvy(CRTC)7May15-09
TNC 2015-134
**** 1 of 2
**** 1 of 2
Q9
[TSPs]

With respect to your company’s operating territory, provide the following information for areas that are currently unserved or underserved as of December 2014:

a.

the technologies used in the access facilities for serving subscribers (or households), such as fixed wireless access (licensed or unlicensed), satellite (direct to home), cable modem, digital subscriber line (DSL), fibre-optics and mobile wireless;

b.

for each technology in (a) above, the average upstream and downstream Internet speeds that you offer;

c.

the technologies used for connecting to the PoP and average capacities in Mbps to / from the PoP; andd.

a map showing your operating territory with the types and locations of access facilities in MapInfo or compatible format.

A.
a.

TekSavvy provides wireline Internet services over third parties’ cable modem and DSL access facilities; and over TekSavvy’s fixed-wireless access facilities We do not have access to detailed knowledge as to wholesale network access providers’ geographic operating territories, including coverage of unserved or underserved territories.

With respect to fixed wireless, households within five kilometres of TekSavvy’s towers reliably achieve speeds that exceed the Commission’s speed objective. Those within five to eight kilometres of TekSavvy towers are underserved by TekSavvy, as they cannot reliably achieve these speeds. Those more than eight kilometres from these towers are unserved by TekSavvy, as they cannot achieve these speeds.

b..

TekSavvy offers plans rated to achieve up to the following speeds:

· 1 Mbps down, 256 Kbps up;
· 3 Mbps down, 512 Kbps up;
· 6 Mbps down, 1 Mbps up; and
· 10 Mbps down, 1 Mbps up.
c.

TekSavvy connects to # POPs using #. The average capacity #.

d.

A map showing TekSavvy’s operating area with the types and locations of access facilities and POPs, responsive to TekSavvy(CRTC)7May15-09d and -10d, is attached in KMZ format.

Confidential information:

The attached map and the grey-highlighted information in the confidential version of this Request for Information (“RFI”) response (“Confidential Information”), which has been redacted from its abridged version, discloses specific details regarding the configuration of TekSavvy’s network architecture which are not known to third parties.

This technical information is not known to the public, is treated consistently in a confidential manner, and would, if disclosed, prejudice TekSavvy’s competitive position in ways that would result in specific, direct harm to TekSavvy, by giving its competitors and suppliers direct insight into TekSavvy’s technical decisions and approach.

For these reasons, the Confidential Information is designated as confidential pursuant to section 39 of the Telecommunications Act; in the manner indicated by section 32 of the CRTC Rules of Practice and Procedure; and following the guidelines set out in Procedures for filing confidential information and requesting its disclosure in Commission proceedings, Broadcasting and Telecom Information Bulletin CRTC 2010-961, 3 December 2010.

***End of Document***

Responses to requests for information - 14 July 2015: Ruralwave (Intervenor 836)

Document Name: DM#2396743 - 2015-134 - Response to request for information - TekSavvy_CRTC_7May15-09 ABRIDGED.doc
CONFIDENTIAL
TekSavvy Solutions Inc.
Response to Request
2 May 2014
TekSavvy(CRTC)28Mar14-17
TNC 2013-551
**** 1 of 1
ABRIDGED
TekSavvy Solutions Inc.
Response to Request
14 July 2015
TekSavvy(CRTC)7May15-09
TNC 2015-134
**** 1 of 2
**** 1 of 2
Q9
[TSPs]

With respect to your company’s operating territory, provide the following information for areas that are currently unserved or underserved as of December 2014:

a.

the technologies used in the access facilities for serving subscribers (or households), such as fixed wireless access (licensed or unlicensed), satellite (direct to home), cable modem, digital subscriber line (DSL), fibre-optics and mobile wireless;

b.

for each technology in (a) above, the average upstream and downstream Internet speeds that you offer;

c.

the technologies used for connecting to the PoP and average capacities in Mbps to / from the PoP; andd.

a map showing your operating territory with the types and locations of access facilities in MapInfo or compatible format.

A.
a.

TekSavvy provides wireline Internet services over third parties’ cable modem and DSL access facilities; and over TekSavvy’s fixed-wireless access facilities We do not have access to detailed knowledge as to wholesale network access providers’ geographic operating territories, including coverage of unserved or underserved territories.

With respect to fixed wireless, households within five kilometres of TekSavvy’s towers reliably achieve speeds that exceed the Commission’s speed objective. Those within five to eight kilometres of TekSavvy towers are underserved by TekSavvy, as they cannot reliably achieve these speeds. Those more than eight kilometres from these towers are unserved by TekSavvy, as they cannot achieve these speeds.

b..

TekSavvy offers plans rated to achieve up to the following speeds:

· 1 Mbps down, 256 Kbps up;
· 3 Mbps down, 512 Kbps up;
· 6 Mbps down, 1 Mbps up; and
· 10 Mbps down, 1 Mbps up.
c.

TekSavvy connects to # POPs using #. The average capacity #.

d.

A map showing TekSavvy’s operating area with the types and locations of access facilities and POPs, responsive to TekSavvy(CRTC)7May15-09d and -10d, is attached in KMZ format.

Confidential information:

The attached map and the grey-highlighted information in the confidential version of this Request for Information (“RFI”) response (“Confidential Information”), which has been redacted from its abridge